Top 10 Thinking Traps Exposed Top 10 Thinking Traps Exposed Our minds set up many traps for us. Unless we’re aware of them, these traps can seriously hinder our ability to think rationally, leading us to bad reasoning and making stupid decisions. Features of our minds that are meant to help us may, eventually, get us into trouble. Here are the first 5 of the most harmful of these traps and how to avoid each one of them.
How to Live With an Unknowable Mind How to Live With an Unknowable Mind We know surprisingly little about our own personalities, attitudes and even self-esteem. How do we live with that? How do you imagine your own mind?
If you’re in a , you know it. In fact, you and your mate likely worked hard to get to that point. However, it’s not always a clear when we’re NOT in a healthy love relationship. Why? Well, we usually carry on relationships in ways that we learned from others—and to us it seems normal. 40 Healthy Relationship Signs 40 Healthy Relationship Signs
Narrowing the red margins of your lips is a clear sign of anger, while massaging your forehead can signal uneasiness. Brushing hair off your face is a combination of nerves and flirtationIf you nod in clusters of three, the speaker will sense your interestStuffing your hands in your pockets means you're probably hiding somethingIn a seated conversation, lifting your toes means your feelings are extra-positive (RealSimple.com) -- Every last gesture -- whether it's a tilt of the head or plain fidgeting -- tells a story. Do you look down when you speak? Play with your hair? Lean to one side? What is your body language saying? What is your body language saying?
Psychology

Depressive realism is the hypothesis developed by Alloy and Abramson[1] that depressed individuals make more realistic inferences than non-depressed individuals. Although depressed individuals are thought to have a negative cognitive bias that results in recurrent, negative automatic thoughts, maladaptive behaviors, and dysfunctional world beliefs,[2][3][4] depressive realism argues not only that this negativity may reflect a more accurate appraisal of the world but also that non-depressed individuals’ appraisals are positively biased.[5] This theory remains very controversial as it brings into question the mechanism of change that cognitive behavioral therapy for depression purports to target.[6] While the evidence currently supports the validity of depressive realism, its effect may be restricted to a select few situations.[7] Evidence for[edit] Depressive realism Depressive realism
How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb by HealingBlight
100 Most Inspirational Quotes Of All Time 100 Most Inspirational Quotes Of All Time Courtesy of My-Inspirational-Quotes.com 1. Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn’t do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor.
Neuroscience of free will Neuroscience of free will Neuroscience of free will refers to recent neuroscientific investigation of questions concerning free will. It is a topic of philosophy and science. One question is whether, and in what sense, rational agents exercise control over their actions or decisions. As it has become possible to study the living brain, researchers have begun to watch decision making processes at work. Findings could carry implications for moral responsibility in general. Moreover, some research shows that if findings seem to challenge people's belief in the idea of free will itself then this can affect their sense of agency (e.g. sense of control in their life).[1][2]
Dunning–Kruger effect Dunning–Kruger effect The Dunning–Kruger effect is a cognitive bias in which unskilled individuals suffer from illusory superiority, mistakenly rating their ability much higher than is accurate. This bias is attributed to a metacognitive inability of the unskilled to recognize their ineptitude.[1] Actual competence may weaken self-confidence, as competent individuals may falsely assume that others have an equivalent understanding. David Dunning and Justin Kruger of Cornell University conclude, "the miscalibration of the incompetent stems from an error about the self, whereas the miscalibration of the highly competent stems from an error about others".[2] Proposal[edit]
Rosenhan's study was done in two parts. The first part involved the use of healthy associates or "pseudopatients" (three women and five men) who briefly feigned auditory hallucinations in an attempt to gain admission to 12 different psychiatric hospitals in five different States in various locations in the United States. All were admitted and diagnosed with psychiatric disorders. After admission, the pseudopatients acted normally and told staff that they felt fine and had not experienced any more hallucinations. Rosenhan experiment Rosenhan experiment
Interesting Info -> Lying Index -> How to Detect Lies Become a Human Lie Detector (Part 1) Warning: sometimes ignorance is bliss. How to Detect Lies - body language, reactions, speech patterns How to Detect Lies - body language, reactions, speech patterns
Body Language and Flirting - Blifaloo Interesting Info -> Body Language -> Flirting Body Language (part 1) Quick Jump: General Signs of Flirting | Male Flirting | Female Flirting Also See: Body Language Resources | Decoding Male Body Language Updated March 21st - 2012.
Me, Myself and My Stranger: Understanding the Neuroscience of Selfhood SELF REFLECTION: Bodily illusions teach neuroscientists about the sense of self.Image: crimfants, flickr.com Where are you right now? Maybe you are at home, the office or a coffee shop—but such responses provide only a partial answer to the question at hand. Asked another way, what is the location of your "self" as you read this sentence? Like most people, you probably have a strong sense that your conscious self is housed within your physical body, regardless of your surroundings. But sometimes this spatial self-location goes awry.
Exercise is a KEY to happiness . Research shows that people who exercise are healthier, more energetic, think more clearly, sleep better, and have delayed onset of dementia . They get relief from anxiety and mild depression . 12 Tips for Getting Regular Exercise and the Benefits for Happiness and Fitness
In psychoanalytic literature, a Madonna–whore complex is the inability to maintain sexual arousal within a committed, loving relationship.[1] First identified by Sigmund Freud, this psychological complex is said to develop in men who see women as either saintly Madonnas or debased prostitutes. Men with this complex desire a sexual partner who has been degraded (the whore) while they cannot desire the respected partner (the Madonna).[2] Freud wrote: "Where such men love they have no desire and where they desire they cannot love."[3] Clinical psychologist Uwe Hartmann, writing in 2009, stated that the complex "is still highly prevalent in today's patients".[2] Madonna–whore complex
Humans This list is a follow up to Top 10 Common Faults in Human Thought. Thanks for everyone’s comments and feedback; you have inspired this second list! It is amazing that with all these biases, people are able to actually have a rational thought every now and then. 10 More Common Faults in Human Thought
Forer effect
Schizophrenia - Topic Overview
Cleveland Clinic Answers 20 Depression Questions
Neuroticism