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Facial Recognition

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Startup: Identifying Dangerous Individuals Using Biometric Face Structure - iHLS. This post is also available in:

Startup: Identifying Dangerous Individuals Using Biometric Face Structure - iHLS

Computers can now read your emotions. Here’s why that’s not as scary as it so... Emotions critically influence all aspects of our lives, from how we live, work, learn and play, to the decisions we make, big and small.

Computers can now read your emotions. Here’s why that’s not as scary as it so...

Emotions drive how we communicate and connect with each other, and impact our health and well-being. Human emotional intelligence (or your EQ) is our ability to recognize not only our own emotions but also those of other people, and to use emotions to guide our behaviour, adapt to different environments and achieve our goals. Humans with high EQ lead more successful professional and personal lives – they are more likable and more persuasive, tend to be more effective leaders, and generally lead healthier, happier and even longer lives. Galaxy S8 face recognition already defeated with a simple picture. Samsung just recently took the wraps off its latest flagship, the Galaxy S8.

Galaxy S8 face recognition already defeated with a simple picture

In addition to the super-slim bezels, tall screen, and speedy new Snapdragon 835 (or Exynos 9) processor, the device is also coming with a ton of biometric authentication options. You get a fingerprint reader, iris recognition, and face recognition. Real-Time Face Recognition Threatens to Turn Cops’ Body Cameras Into Surveill... Last year, a Russian startup announced that it could scan the faces of people passing by Moscow’s thousands of CCTV cameras and pick out wanted criminals or missing persons.

Real-Time Face Recognition Threatens to Turn Cops’ Body Cameras Into Surveill...

Unlike much face recognition technology — which runs stills from videos or photographs after the fact — NTechLab’s FindFace algorithm has achieved a feat that once only seemed possible in the science fictional universe of “Minority Report”: It can determine not just who someone is, but where they’ve been, where they’re going, and whether they have an outstanding warrant, immigration detainer, or unpaid traffic ticket.

For years, the development of real-time face recognition has been hampered by poor video resolution, the angles of bodies in motion, and limited computing power. But as systems begin to transcend these technical barriers, they are also outpacing the development of policies to constrain them. Police see the appeal. Photo: David McNew/Getty Images A Digital Enemies List Photo: Mary Altaffer/AP. Facial recognition database used by FBI is out of control, House committee he... Approximately half of adult Americans’ photographs are stored in facial recognition databases that can be accessed by the FBI, without their knowledge or consent, in the hunt for suspected criminals.

Facial recognition database used by FBI is out of control, House committee he...

This creepy facial recognition app lets users find strangers on Facebook by t... G facial recognition. FB facial recognition. Alessandro Acquisti FB face recognition. Facial recognition privacy/regulation. Facial recognition privacy/regulation. Facial recognition performance. Germany ask FB to destroy database. Facial recognition identifies SSN. Iris scanning. The FBI has collected 430,000 iris scans in a so-called 'pilot program' To create that pool of scans, the FBI has struck information-sharing agreements with other agencies, including US Border Patrol, the Pentagon, and local law enforcement departments.

The FBI has collected 430,000 iris scans in a so-called 'pilot program'

California has been most aggressive about collecting scans, but agencies in Texas and Missouri can also add to and search the system. The result amounts to a new national biometric database that stretches the traditional boundaries of a pilot program, while staying just outside the reach of privacy mandates often required for such data-gathering projects. Half of US adults are recorded in police facial recognition databases, study says. Facial recognition software 'sounds like science fiction,' but may affect half of Americans - Home. Thursday October 20, 2016 Next time you're walking down a busy sidewalk, look at the person on your left. Then, look at the person on your right. Next, look up at the security camera mounted on the side of a building. Rights groups request U.S. probe police use of facial recognition.

Memo to the DOJ: Facial Recognition’s Threat to Privacy is Worse Than Anyone Thought. Before all of this ever went down In another place, another town You were just a face in the crowd You were just a face in the crowd Out in the street walking around A face in the crowd-Tom Petty If we don’t speak up now, the days when we can walk around with our heads held high without fear of surveillance are numbered.

Memo to the DOJ: Facial Recognition’s Threat to Privacy is Worse Than Anyone Thought

Federal and local law enforcement across the country are adopting sophisticated facial recognition technologies to identify us on the streets and in social media by matching our faces to massive databases. We knew the threat was looming. But a brand new report from the Georgetown Law Center for Privacy and Technology indicates the problem is far worse than we could’ve imagined. The researchers compare the use of facial recognition to a perpetual line-up, where everyday, law-abiding citizens are pulled into law enforcement investigations without their consent and, in many cases, without their knowledge. 1.

Read the coalition letter to the U.S. It’s no secret that American law has been building facial recognition databases to aide in its investigations.

But a new, comprehensive report on the status of facial recognition as a tool in law enforcement shows the sheer scope and reach of the FBI’s database of faces and those of state-level law enforcement agencies: Roughly half of American adults are included in those collections. And that massive assembly of biometric data is accessed with only spotty oversight of its accuracy and how it’s used and searched. The 150-page report, released on Tuesday by the Center for Privacy & Technology at the Georgetown University law school, found that law enforcement databases now include the facial recognition information of 117 million Americans, about one in two U.S. adults. Creepy or cool? Snap photos of strangers to find them on social media. KK: Do tech companies have a duty to protect people’s identities?

Creepy or cool? Snap photos of strangers to find them on social media

AK: We just launched the cloud face recognition software platform, which is available for every business to plug into and use for their own recognition tasks. Hackers Trick Facial-Recognition Logins With Photos From Facebook (What Else?) Facial recognition makes sense as a method for your computer to recognize you.

Hackers Trick Facial-Recognition Logins With Photos From Facebook (What Else?)

After all, humans already use a powerful version of it to tell each other apart. 12 pictures that show the complete absurdity of using age software on refugees. On Wednesday, Microsoft told indy100 that the facial recognition used by the Daily Mail and the Express to allege a refugee was overage was never intended to be used for this purpose. Social media users first noticed the inappropriate use of the software. A spokesperson for the company then told us: How-old.net was designed to be an example of how developers could build a fun app using modern development practices. It is not intended to be used as a definitive assessment of age. Regardless, the Express and the Mail have continued to use the software to allege that child refugees admitted from the Calais camp are overage, running pieces online littered with pictures from the app.

Log In. Photo A new report by a think tank at Georgetown University calls for greater oversight in the use of emerging facial recognition software that makes the images of more than 117 million Americans — a disproportionate number of them black — searchable by law enforcement agencies. While the agencies, including the F.B.I., have historically created fingerprint and DNA databases primarily from criminal investigations, many of the photographs scattered among agencies at all levels of government are of law-abiding Americans, according to the report released Tuesday.

The report found that 16 states allowed law enforcement officials to compare the faces of suspects to photographs on driver’s licenses and other forms of identification without a warrant, “creating a virtual lineup.” “This is unprecedented and highly problematic,” said the report, by the Center on Privacy and Technology at Georgetown’s law school.

These were among the steps the authors suggested taking: Continue reading the main story. FBI Facial Recognition Database Innocent People. If you have a driver's license, odds are better than even that your photo is sitting in a police database somewhere. And if you are young, female or black, the facial recognition software that compares your face to a video image may not get a perfect match. Those are two of the surprising findings of a new study this week that found that 117 million Americans — more than half of all adults — have been quietly added to facial recognition databases held by state and local law enforcement agencies. All drivers in Maryland and Virginia, for example, have been added into a computer. So, too, have residents of San Francisco, Los Angeles and San Diego, Calif.

The New York Police Department may soon use these databases to match drivers' licenses to video from close-circuit TV cameras. Checking for identification markers such as fingerprints or DNA against a database of known criminals has been commonplace in police departments. RELATED: Face Recognition Method Works in Utter Darkness. Researchers create 3D faces from online photos to defeat face authentication systems. Security researchers continue to find ways around biometric-based security features, including a new attack which can defeat face authentication systems. You might be careful about posting photos of yourself online, either refraining from it or setting the images to private, but your “friends” might post pictures of you online. Plow.