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Herbs Spices

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Fenugreek. Fenugreek (/ˈfɛnjʉɡriːk/; Trigonella foenum-graecum) is an annual plant in the family Fabaceae, with leaves consisting of three small obovate to oblong leaflets.


It is cultivated worldwide as a semiarid crop, and its seeds are a common ingredient in dishes from the Indian Subcontinent in South Asia. History[edit] Fenugreek is believed to have been brought into cultivation in the Near East. While Zohary and Hopf are uncertain which wild strain of the genus Trigonella gave rise to domesticated fenugreek, charred fenugreek seeds have been recovered from Tell Halal, Iraq, (carbon dated to 4000 BC) and Bronze Age levels of Lachish and desiccated seeds from the tomb of Tutankhamen.[2] Cato the Elder lists fenugreek with clover and vetch as crops grown to feed cattle.[3] Fenugreek. Herbs at a Glance [NCCAM Health Information] Dill Seed — Seeds — Cooking & Baking — NutsOnline. Carom Seeds - Ajwain - Bishop's Weed - Indian Spices - Guide to Indian Spices. Indian name and pronounciation: Ajwain, pronounced as uj-wine Appearance, taste and smell: Ajwain seeds are pale khaki colored and look like a smaller version of cumin seeds.

Carom Seeds - Ajwain - Bishop's Weed - Indian Spices - Guide to Indian Spices

They are highly fragrant and smell and taste like thyme (with a stronger flavor). Buying it: Sumac. Sumac What is Sumac?


Sumac comes from the berries of a wild bush that grows wild in all Mediterranean areas, especially in Sicily and southern Italy, and parts of the Middle East, notably Iran. It is an essential ingredient in Arabic cooking, being preferred to lemon for sourness and astringency.