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Earliest Human History

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Morocco Fossils Are 100,000 Years Older Than Earliest Recorded Modern Humans. Paleoanthropologists carefully excavate the remains of five ancient individuals, discovered in what was once a large cave.

Morocco Fossils Are 100,000 Years Older Than Earliest Recorded Modern Humans

The cave at what's now known as the Jebel Irhoud site in Morocco became buried, over the eons, under layers of rock and sediment. Shannon McPherron/Nature hide caption toggle caption Shannon McPherron/Nature Paleoanthropologists carefully excavate the remains of five ancient individuals, discovered in what was once a large cave. Morocco Fossils Are 100,000 Years Older Than Earliest Recorded Modern Humans. Paleoanthropologists carefully excavate the remains of five ancient individuals, discovered in what was once a large cave.

Morocco Fossils Are 100,000 Years Older Than Earliest Recorded Modern Humans

The cave at what's now known as the Jebel Irhoud site in Morocco became buried, over the eons, under layers of rock and sediment. Shannon McPherron/Nature hide caption toggle caption Shannon McPherron/Nature. 'First of our kind' found in Morocco. Media playback is unsupported on your device The idea that modern people evolved in a single "cradle of humanity" in East Africa some 200,000 years ago is no longer tenable, new research suggests.

'First of our kind' found in Morocco

Fossils of five early humans have been found in North Africa that show Homo sapiens emerged at least 100,000 years earlier than previously recognised. It suggests that our species evolved all across the continent, the scientists involved say. Their work is published in the journal Nature. Did Humans Arrive in America a Hundred Thousand Years Earlier Than We Thought? In 1992, Thomas Deméré, a paleontologist at the San Diego Natural History Museum, and several of his colleagues were called in to inspect an array of bones that had been unearthed by highway workers building Route 54, just south of the city.

Did Humans Arrive in America a Hundred Thousand Years Earlier Than We Thought?

What turned up was the Pleistocene. The site was rich with fossils tens of thousands of years old, including the remains of a camel, a horse, a dire wolf, a ground sloth, and, most impressive, a mastodon. DNA Samples Reveal That Aboriginals Have Been in Australia For About 50,000 Years Already. The first people appeared in Australia about 50,000 years ago and Aboriginal people have been present in the same regions continuously since then.

DNA Samples Reveal That Aboriginals Have Been in Australia For About 50,000 Years Already

This was revealed by DNA in hair samples collected from Aboriginal people across Australia in the early to mid-1900s. These findings are the first detailed genetic map of Aboriginal Australia before the arrival of Europeans and confirm the Aboriginal communities’ strong connection to the country. The University of Adelaide’s Australian Centre for Ancient DNA (ACAD), in partnership with the South Australian Museum, has recently launched the Aboriginal Heritage Project and these are the first results from that study. In a series of remarkable anthropological expeditions across Australia from 1928 to the 1970s, 111 hair samples were collected and these are now part of the South Australian Museum’s unparalleled collection of hair samples. Researchers analyzed mitochondrial DNA from these hair samples. Kaurna Elder, Mr. Save. Australia was colonized by a single group 50,000 years ago.

There are two central mysteries about human history in Australia.

Australia was colonized by a single group 50,000 years ago

First, when did people arrive on the world's southernmost inhabitable continent? And second, how did they colonize it? A paper in Nature offers new answers, based on an extensive analysis of decades-old DNA. By studying the mitochondrial DNA of Aboriginal Australians from all across the continent, University of Adelaide biologist Alan Cooper and his team were able to trace the population back to its most recent common ancestor, a woman who lived between 43,000 and 47,000 years ago.

Indigenous Australians most ancient civilisation on Earth, DNA study confirms. Denmark - History - Prehistory. Denmark 6.

Denmark - History - Prehistory

History 6.1 Prehistory [Main menu] - [Previous paragraph] - [Next paragraph] The Stone Age (until c. 1700 BC) The Palaeolithic Period (until c. 9300 BC). Where Did The First Americans Come From? We were all told they walked over a land bridge from Asia. Now that theory’s being called into question. You were probably told in school about how the first people reached North America over ten thousand years ago.

We were all told they walked over a land bridge from Asia. Now that theory’s being called into question.

The explanation most history or social studies teacher’s gave was that they crossed what is known as the Bering Strait Land Bridge (the Beringa) from Siberia to Alaska. This has been the prevailing theory since the 1930s. There is DNA evidence to support that people did in fact cross the Beringa and may even have lived on it for thousands of years, following herds and making their way little by little. They hunted large game such as mammoths and bison down into the North American continent, spreading out from there. But did the first Americans really come this way? De Sahelanthropus à Homo sapiens : à quoi ressemblaient nos prédécesseurs ? - Google Arts & Culture. Where Did Agriculture Begin? Oh Boy, It's Complicated. The Zagros Mountain range, which lies at the border between Iran and Iraq, was home to some of the world's earliest farmers.

Where Did Agriculture Begin? Oh Boy, It's Complicated

JTB Photo/UIG via Getty Images hide caption toggle caption JTB Photo/UIG via Getty Images. Neanderthals Built Mystery Cave Rings 175,000 Years Ago. They painted magnificent cave paintings.

Neanderthals Built Mystery Cave Rings 175,000 Years Ago

They mastered fire and used tools. And now we know they constructed complex buildings deep within subterranean caves, and they did it more than 175,000 years ago. No, we're not talking about early humans. Neanderthals did all this. Ancient DNA Sequencing Sheds Light on Ice Age European Population History. Study: Early Men and Women Were Equal in Tribal Society. Inequality among men and women is a feature of our post-agrarian society, not a quality inherent to earlier hunter-gatherer groups, according to new analyses done by anthropologists at University College London. The study opposes the notion that sexual equality is merely a goal of modern society that is mostly free of concerns over resource scarcity.

The researchers examined how contemporary hunter-gatherer groups formed social relationships and self-organized, one in the Congo and one in the Philippines, "including kinship relations, movement between camps, and residence patterns, through hundreds of interviews. " They found that women had as much say as men concerning the group's most important decision, such as when to move on from an area and with whom the groups should socialize. Specifically, anthropologists believe women's influence resulted in larger and more diverse social networks — a quality that was surely advantageous form an evolutionary perspective. DNA analysis of Denisovan molars offers more clues about ancient human relative. (Phys.org)—A team of researchers with members from Germany, Canada and Russia has conducted a DNA analysis of two molars found in the Denisova caves in Siberia shedding more light on the origins of the Denisovans—a hominin species that lived or at least visited Siberia approximately a hundred thousand years ago.

In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the team describes their analysis and what they have learned about the extinct species. The existence of the Denisovans was discovered back in 2008 when a team of scientists found a finger bone and a tooth in the Denisova caves in the Russian mountains. The size of the teeth suggests that the Denisovans had very large jaws and more likely resembled Neanderthals than humans.

The Denisovans are considered to be cousins of modern humans, occupying a branch of the family tree-but, like the Neanderthal, they eventually disappeared. Animated map shows how humans migrated across the globe. Skara Brae ancient settlement 2 clicks please. History can a bit dry and boring at times. It seems to exist solely between the musty pages of old books. But once in awhile, you come across a bit of history that appears to come alive the moment you discover it. That’s how I felt when I heard about this place. Oldest Cave Paintings May Be Creations of Neandertals, Not Modern Humans. Hand stencils in El Castillo cave are older than previously thought. Image: courtesy of Pedro Saura In a cave in northwestern Spain called El Castillo, ancient artists decorated a stretch of limestone wall with dozens of depictions of human hands.

They seem to have made the images by pressing a hand to the wall and then blowing red pigment on it, creating a sort of stencil. Hand stencils are a common motif in the cave paintings of Spain and France, and like all cave art, they have long been considered to be the work of anatomically modern humans like us. But a new analysis of the age of the paintings in El Castillo and other Spanish caves shows that some of these paintings are much older than previously thought—old enough, in some cases, to be the handiwork of our cousins the Neandertals. Ancestral Lines 2 clicks please. Evolutionary biologists use a cladogram, the treelike diagram of evolutionary branches or clades, to organize species into lines of evolutionary descent across time. Biologists use three types of evidence to deduce evolutionary connections: genetics, morphology, and geologic dating.

(Behavior, normally a key part of evolutionary studies, can only be inferred in extinct species — for example, by examining the ecology in which the species flourished and the species adaptations for eating and locomotion.) Analyses of primate fossils and the genetic relatedness of living primates converge to the conclusion that humans and chimpanzees branched from a common ancestor about 7 million years ago.

DNA recovered from several uncontaminated Neanderthalensis fossils indicated that modern humans and extinct neanderthals diverged about 400,000 years ago; but more recent studies show that they must have interbred within Europe or the Middle East since then. The Latest Mysteries Of The Earth History. Prehistory. Ancient Man Used “Super-Acoustics” to Alter Consciousness (... and speak with the dead?) A prehistoric necropolis yields clues to the ancient use of sound and its effect on human brain activity.

Rebel Paleolithic artist breaks the rules, draws a campsite 13,800 years ago. Prehistoric Home Sketch Found: Photos. What can a 45,000-year-old mammoth carcass say about human history? Living above the Arctic circle provides a suite of challenges for humans, particularly during the last Ice Age. They would have struggled to keep warm and gather the necessary resources to survive the cold landscape, or so we thought.

New research suggests anatomically modern humans may have lived remarkably far North in central Siberia as early as 45,000 years ago, a feat that would mean our ancestors were more technologically advanced than we previously believed. The Bear Bone which is re-writing Irish history. Study: Chopping food, eating meat helped ancient humans evolve. Slicing up a mound of raw food isn’t just a tedious chore on the way to dinner. Chopped food, along with an embrace of meat, helped make us human, new evidence suggests. Both meat consumption and the Paleolithic version of kitchen prep paved the way for major changes in the anatomy of ancient humans, according to a study in this week’s Nature.

Stone Age humans evolved smaller faces and teeth after they threw off vegetarianism and began investing a little more time on their meals, the study argues. Those anatomical changes not only made early humans look more like the Homo sapiens we know today, but also may have helped them run and talk.