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Plus les riches sont riches et moins la croissance est forte. Le Monde.fr | • Mis à jour le | Par Claire Guélaud Les tenants de la théorie du « ruissellement » ou « trickle down », selon laquelle les revenus des plus riches contribueraient à la croissance, ont du souci à se faire : des économistes du Fonds monétaire international (FMI) contestent ouvertement cette approche.

Plus les riches sont riches et moins la croissance est forte

Dans une étude sur les causes et les conséquences des inégalités, présentée lundi 15 juin, ils établissent au contraire que, plus la fortune des riches s’accroît, moins forte est la croissance. Vivre ensemble - entre richesse et pauvreté . Sondage IPSOS. Gladwell on Income Inequality: We're Off the Rails. What The Great Gatsby Teaches Us About America In 1 Chart. There's more to take away from The Great Gatsby than that Leo DiCaprio and a Jay-Z soundtrack can mix surprisingly well, according to the White House.

What The Great Gatsby Teaches Us About America In 1 Chart

The White House has released a chart illustrating the "Great Gatsby Curve," a concept Alan Krueger, the chairman of the White House Council of Economic Advisers, introduced last year. The curve, Krueger said, helps explain that children born into countries with higher levels of income inequality are less likely to move up the income ladder later in life. (You may remember from high school that one of the themes of The Great Gatsby revolves around the consequences of extreme wealth). The concept isn't going away. Because of a rise in income inequality over the past 25 years, the income advantages and disadvantages that parents pass on to their children is expected to rise by about 25 percent over the next generation, Krueger said in a speech last year, when he first introduced the concept.

Davos se soucie des inégalités de revenus et du climat - Gouvernance. Richard Wilkinson: How economic inequality harms societies. Les inégalités nuisent gravement à la cohésion sociale - Vivre Ensemble. L'égalité est-elle meilleure pour tous ? The Great Divide is a series on inequality. The French economist Thomas Piketty swept across the United States last week with a dire warning: Income inequality isn’t going to go away, and it probably will get worse.

The Great Divide is a series on inequality

Only policies that directly address the problem — in particular, progressive taxation — can help us change course. At a panel discussion in Washington of Piketty’s new blockbuster, “Capital in the Twenty-First Century,” the American economist Robert Solow, who served on President Kennedy’s Council of Economic Advisers, took the long view as he formulated his response to the idea of trying to democratize ownership of capital in our country. “Good luck with that,” he said. Read more… Most people, asked whether parental involvement benefits children academically, would say, “of course it does.” Over the past few years, we conducted an extensive study of whether the depth of parental engagement in children’s academic lives improved their test scores and grades.

Javier Jaén When the G.I. Thomas Piketty : "Il faut taxer fortement les très hauts revenus" We'd All Be Much Wealthier If We Acted Like a Society—Instead We Prop Up the Private Wealth of a Small Number of Elites. Photo Credit: shutterstock August 23, 2013 | Like this article?

We'd All Be Much Wealthier If We Acted Like a Society—Instead We Prop Up the Private Wealth of a Small Number of Elites

Join our email list: Stay up to date with the latest headlines via email. Congress is in recess, but you'd hardly know it. L'inégalité source d'instabilité - Les Crises Olivier Berruyer. Les inégalités nuisent gravement à la cohésion sociale - Vivre Ensemble. Le danger des lignes Maginot des inégalités croissantes. Mon propos essentiel était qu’il ne s’agissait pas d’une crise, mais d’une transformation en profondeur du monde : parler de crise, c’est laisser penser que les problèmes actuels sont graves, mais transitoires, et que l’objectif est de revenir à un passé perdu.

Le danger des lignes Maginot des inégalités croissantes

Je crois qu’une telle vision est une erreur profonde, car demain ne pourra être comme hier, ce sous l’effet de trois forces qui s’entremêlent : Study: The More a Country Taxes the Rich, the Happier its People - Politics. Billionaire businessman Warren Buffett, pictured above, argued in a New York Times op-ed last month that the U.S. government doesn't tax him and his super-rich friends enough.

Study: The More a Country Taxes the Rich, the Happier its People - Politics

"I know well many of the mega-rich and, by and large, they are very decent people," wrote Buffett. "Most wouldn’t mind being told to pay more in taxes as well, particularly when so many of their fellow citizens are truly suffering. " On the opposite end of the spectrum from Buffett are the few but wildly vocal Tea Party supporters, who advocate a flat tax or the "fair tax," a plan that taxes a person's spending, not their income. Science can't tell us which of those plans is "right," per se, but it can help point us in the best direction. And if science is to be believed, it turns out Buffett may be onto something. Using Gallup numbers from 2007, University of Virginia psychologist Shigehiro Oishi looked into the relationship between tax systems and quality-of-life polling in 54 nations.