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Open Educational Resources infoKit - UK

Open Educational Resources infoKit - UK
Overview Management Learning & Teaching Technical Legal JISC/HE Academy UKOER Programme UKOER tweets Going further... Recent changes to the infoKit Cookie statement Last Cookiweek David Kernohan, a JISC Programme Manager, commented in a Guardian article last week that Open Educational Resources are a radical idea that has now become mainstream. To try and condense some of the vast amount that has been learnt about the benefits of OER releases in the past 10 years, the Higher Education Academy and JISC have developed an InfoKit. (David Kernohan) As David mentions, one section that was missing up until now is a section giving an overview of Open Educational Resources for Senior Managers. · OER infoKit >>> Senior Management Overview >>> Menu If you're a Senior Manager - or even if you're not - we'd love some feedback!

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Why We Fund Open Textbooks (and Plan to Do More) Textbooks aren’t new or novel, and they certainly don’t represent the cutting edge of the Open Educational Resources (OER) movement that the Hewlett Foundation has long supported. But it’s precisely because of the way they are deeply embedded in the education system that they have the potential to shift OER from the exception to the default in schools and colleges across the world. And make no mistake: OER is poised for widespread adoption, with research showing that nearly 10% of K-12 teachers and over 10% of higher education faculty in the United States regularly use OER in some form. That realization, which heavily informed the strategic planning process we began when TJ Bliss and Dana Schmidt came on board as program officers for OER, formed the basis of our revised strategy for OER.

Workshop: considering openness I facilitated a workshop with academic staff at GMIT (Galway-Mayo Institute of Technology) last week in which we considered, mostly through group discussion, openness as educators. Carina Ginty invited me to share some of the ideas from Navigating the Marvellous: openness in education as a prompt for the discussion. The following slidedeck summarises some of the concepts we explored and the activity used to kick off the discussion. ccc

Make Textbooks Affordable Everyone knows that textbooks prices are outrageous. Students spend an average of $1,200 a year on textbooks and course materials, and prices have been rising more than for times the rate of inflation for the past two decades! It’s no accident that textbooks are so expensive. Publishing companies are raking in huge profits while engaging in bad practices that drive up costs: issuing new editions that make used books hard to find, bundling textbooks with unnecessary CDs and pass-codes, and more. They get away with it because students don’t have a choice -- we’ve got to buy the book they’re selling, even if the price is outrageous.

Open Professionals Education Network CC licensed (BY) Flickr photo shared by David Amsler modified by Paul Stacey Reusing existing Open Educational Resources (OER) can save significant time and effort. The OPEN partners recommend TAACCCT grantees invest up-front time finding OER to reuse rather than starting development of new educational resources right away. A significant benefit of OER is that they provide source material to build your development efforts around. No need to invest development effort in creating something that already exists. 3 Major Publishers Sue Open-Education Textbook Start-Up - Wired Campus Open-education resources have been hailed as a trove of freely available information that can be used to build textbooks at virtually no cost. But a copyright lawsuit filed last month presents a potential roadblock for the burgeoning movement. A group of three large academic publishers has sued the start-up Boundless Learning in federal court, alleging that the young company, which produces open-education alternatives to printed textbooks, has stolen the creative expression of their authors and editors, violating their intellectual-property rights. The publishers Pearson, Cengage Learning, and Macmillan Higher Education filed their joint complaint last month in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York.

Use and Abuse of Reusable Learning Objects 1 Movements in the Learning Object Economy In the past 5-7 years there have been considerable efforts in the computer-mediated learning field towards standardization of metadata elements to facilitate a common method for identifying, searching and retrieving Learning Objects (LOs). Recently, a consensus has emerged among the various bodies spearheading these efforts - including the IEEE Learning Technology Standards Committee (LTSC) Learning Object Metadata Working Group, the IMS Global Learning Consortium, Inc., and the Dublin Core Metadata Initiative - on what these common metadata elements might be.

Launching Blackboard Collaborate Start Session Optionally, you can pre-configure your computer and test your audio using one of our Configuration Rooms prior to your session. Please visit our "First time Users" section in the Support Portal to view configuration rooms for Blackboard Collaborate web conferencing. Note: When joining a Blackboard Collaborate web conferencing session for the first time you will see a Security Dialog. Blackboard Collaborate web conferencing is asking for you to run this application without a verification of its digital signature. Due to the dynamic abilities of our software we are unable to sign certain application files.

Webinars 2012 Archives « Community College Consortium for Open Educational Resources Apr 9 OER Impact Research Faculty and Student Voices Archive and Slides Available March 12 Celebrate Open Education Week Archives and Slides Available, Boyoung Chae and Jen Klaudinyi Archives and Slides Available Natalie Clewell, Cynthia Alexander, and Paul Golisch Archives and Slides Available Donna Gaudet and Quill West Introduction to Openness in Education Welcome to Introduction to Openness in Education. This course provides a broad overview of the ways in which openness impacts many areas of education – curriculum, instruction, learning, policy, technology, research, and finance, among others. My name is David Wiley, and I'm the designer of your open course. You can learn more about me at my website, davidwiley.org (Links to an external site.). The main goal of this course is to give you a broad but shallow grounding in the primary areas of work in the field of open education. Never fear, however – as you review the badges available for this course you’ll see that you have plenty of opportunity to dive deeper in the specific areas that interest you.

Blackboard Collaborate Start Session Optionally, you can pre-configure your computer and test your audio using one of our Configuration Rooms prior to your session. Please visit our "First time Users" section in the Support Portal to view configuration rooms for Blackboard Collaborate web conferencing. About The Licenses Our public copyright licenses incorporate a unique and innovative “three-layer” design. Each license begins as a traditional legal tool, in the kind of language and text formats that most lawyers know and love. We call this the Legal Code layer of each license. But since most creators, educators, and scientists are not in fact lawyers, we also make the licenses available in a format that normal people can read — the Commons Deed (also known as the “human readable” version of the license). The Commons Deed is a handy reference for licensors and licensees, summarizing and expressing some of the most important terms and conditions. Think of the Commons Deed as a user-friendly interface to the Legal Code beneath, although the Deed itself is not a license, and its contents are not part of the Legal Code itself.

The Extended Argument for Openness in Education: Introduction to Openness in Education The Extended Argument for Openness in Education There are a number of ways openness affects the practices of teaching and learning and the motivations behind supporters of these emergent practices. Below, I discuss the three principal influences of openness on education: open educational resources, open access, and open teaching. Open Educational Resources "Open educational resources" (or OER) have become a widely discussed topic in recent years. Open educational resources are educational materials (e.g., course textbooks, research articles, videos, assessments, simulations, etc.) that are either (a) licensed under an open copyright license (e.g., Creative Commons1) or (b) in the public domain.

5 Reasons Why Educators Should Network The period of isolationism in the United States ended during World War II, but while political isolation is no more, educational isolation is still prevalent in public schools today. Many teachers go to school each day, teach their students and leave. If they're struggling with how to teach a lesson that will engage their students, they might ask for advice from the teacher down the hall, but a lot of times, they struggle alone. That's not the case for educators who have built a network of people who share resources, advice and techniques, whether they call it a personal learning network or something else. Here's why educators should start a personal learning network, or PLN.

Open Educational Resources - Babson Survey Research Group 2016 National Report Opening the Textbook: Open Education Resources in U.S. Higher Education, 2015-16

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