background preloader

The Art of Complex Problem Solving

The Art of Complex Problem Solving

http://www.idiagram.com/CP/cpprocess.html

Related:  InfographicsSelf-helpBusinessRevealingBeing Complex

100 Diagrams That Changed the World Since the dawn of recorded history, we’ve been using visual depictions to map the Earth, order the heavens, make sense of time, dissect the human body, organize the natural world, perform music, and even concretize abstract concepts like consciousness and love. 100 Diagrams That Changed the World (public library) by investigative journalist and documentarian Scott Christianson chronicles the history of our evolving understanding of the world through humanity’s most groundbreaking sketches, illustrations, and drawings, ranging from cave paintings to The Rosetta Stone to Moses Harris’s color wheel to Tim Berners-Lee’s flowchart for a “mesh” information management system, the original blueprint for the world wide web. It appears that no great diagram is solely authored by its creator. Most of those described here were the culmination of centuries of accumulated knowledge. Most arose from collaboration (and oftentimes in competition) with others.

How to Use 43 Folders A very simple guide to leaving here quickly so you can get back to making something awesome. Ask yourself… Why am I here right now instead of making something cool on my own? What’s the barrier to me starting that right now? Jeff Bezos: The Smart People Change Their Minds Amazon.com Founder and CEO Jeff Bezos stopped by the 37signals office yesterday and offered some wise thoughts about strategy. His views are especially refreshing in a time when people who change their views often get portrayed as weak and lacking confidence. 37signals Founder Jason Fried shared what Bezos said in a blog post he published this morning. After talking for 90-minutes about product strategy, Bezos impressed Fried with his observations about people who are “right a lot.” The people who are right a lot often change their minds. Bezos said he doesn’t think consistency of thought as a particularly positive trait.

Smart, dumb, candybar, flip, and brick: a visual history of mobile phones For most of their history, mobile phones have been shrinking. Small meant portable; it even, in the not too distant past, was a sort of status symbol. Remember Motorola’s runaway hit, the ultra-thin Razr? But something funny happened on the smartphone’s way to success. Even as the phones themselves became thinner and lighter, their screens started to grow. This trend was driven by consumer demand, but what made it possible were simultaneous improvements in a handful of unrelated technologies.

Too complex to exist - The Boston Globe ON . 10, 1996, a single power line in western Oregon brushed a tree and shorted out, triggering a massive cascade of power outages that spread across the western United States. Frantic engineers watched helplessly as the crisis unfolded, leaving nearly 10 million people without electricity. Even after power was restored, they were unable to explain adequately why it had happened, or how they could prevent a similar cascade from happening again - which it did, in the Northeast on Aug. 14, 2003. Over the past year we have experienced something similar in the financial system: a dramatic and unpredictable cascade of events that has produced the economic equivalent of a global blackout. As governments struggle to fix the crisis, experts have weighed in on the causes of the meltdown, from excess leverage, to lax oversight, to the way executives are paid.

10 Lame Documents that Would Be Better as Infographics Infographics, it seems, have taken the media by storm. Because they are visually attractive, eye-catching, accessible, fun, and–if done well–quickly and effectively informative, people are drawn to them. And businesses have caught wind of this. We see infographics in magazines, on blogs, and even on corporate “About Us” pages in order to sell news, ideas, and products. But what if infographics were used for more “common” documents–the stuff we use day-to-day?

3 Ingredients For Accessing Your Creative Genius You are able to do a certain set of things better than anyone else. This is your core genius. It is your original brand of brilliance. For instance, some people are excellent at interpersonal relating. As a result, they attract top-talent into their organization and gain buy-in for projects extremely quickly. 1 in 2 new graduates are jobless or underemployed WASHINGTON (AP) — The college class of 2012 is in for a rude welcome to the world of work. A weak labor market already has left half of young college graduates either jobless or underemployed in positions that don't fully use their skills and knowledge. Young adults with bachelor's degrees are increasingly scraping by in lower-wage jobs — waiter or waitress, bartender, retail clerk or receptionist, for example — and that's confounding their hopes a degree would pay off despite higher tuition and mounting student loans. An analysis of government data conducted for The Associated Press lays bare the highly uneven prospects for holders of bachelor's degrees.

Science On a Sphere Playlist Builder ../ftp_mirror/atmosphere/lightning/media/thumbnail_small.jpg Annual Lightning Flash Rate Map dataset.php?id=6 Annual Lightning Flash Rate Map

Related:  PsychologyEducationCreativityLEARNCOLLABORATIONspirituality world peaceTHE MIND WORKINGSInterestingMathematicsLogicInfo GraphicsyuudokuinuContemporary!EducationSelected SitesSocial EducationInfographieScience & MathematicsdebateInnovationTo Do+Read+KnowpsychologyUseful SitesPicsstarchasrrandomThing to look at later