background preloader

Writing - How to write English texts

Writing - How to write English texts
Related:  writingteaching English

Find language courses, learn English online,learn Spanish, French,German,Italian, Portugues, Chinese Do you have a question about the correct usage of the semi-colon or how to place relative adverbs in a sentence? If so, you've come to the right place! The edufind.com English grammar guide is a complete reference on the rules of English usage. Comparisons Conditional Future Gerund and Present Participle Infinitive Passive Voice Past Present Functions and classes of determiners Articles Quantifiers Distributives

Tone in Writing: Teach Students How to Identify Tone and Use it Effectively in their Own Writing. written by: Trent Lorcher • edited by: SForsyth • updated: 1/17/2012 It has been my observation that students cannot identify tone, identify whether or not their writing reflects tone, or understand the importance of what they are saying and how they are saying it. Let's take care of that problem right now. After teaching students how to write for an audience and with a purpose, how to effectively evaluate point of view, and how to maintain personal voice, I felt good about myself. Lesson Plans: Fine Tune Your Writing Focus Writing that lacks focus confuses readers. The greatest creative writing activity ever UPDATE: This post was awarded the British Council’s Teaching English blog award for February, 2013. Thanks to all those who voted for my work, you’re awesome. This post is a response to a question posed on the British Council’s Teaching English page on Facebook: ‘Have you got a favourite lesson plan or class activity that you come back to and use again and again? What does it consist of? What makes it work?’ Ok, let me dive straight into it. First, I’ll describe the activity, and then I’ll tell you why it’s great. 1. How long have you been on the planet? 2. You are going to write a paragraph that tells a story.Your paragraph will be a response to these questions.Any sentence you write is OK, but you must follow the sequence of questions.You can ask me for help while you are writing. 3. What kind of language might we use to answer the first question? 4. Twenty minutes is long enough for most to finish. 5. Why does this work so well? 1. ‘When did you arrive on the planet?’ Passive structures 2.

How to Write a Five-Paragraph Essay By Grace Fleming Updated October 27, 2015. As you've probably noticed, essay writing assignments can pop up in any class. An essay is a literary composition that expresses a certain idea, claim, or concept and backs it up with supporting statements. It will follow a logical pattern, to include an introductory paragraph (make the claim), a body (support), and a conclusion (summary of statements and support). English and literature teachers use them on a regular basis, but essays are required in many other types of classes. Essay exams are also a test tool used commonly in the social sciences, and even in math and science class. Of course, essays play a big role in the college application process, as well. Luckily, you can learn to craft a great essay if you can follow the standard pattern and write in a clear and organized manner. Introduction The introduction is the first paragraph in your essay, and it should accomplish a few specific goals. 1. continue reading below our video Loaded: 0% 2. 3.

English Grammar Be a better writer in 15 minutes: 4 TED-Ed lessons on grammar and word choice There’s no denying it — the English language can be mighty tricky. When writing a paper, a novel or even an e-mail, you might look at a sentence you just wrote and think, “Is that comma supposed to be there?” or “Is that really the best word to use?” First, let’s look at the often-confusing comma. What about the Oxford comma? Now, take an adjective such as “implacable” or a verb like “proliferate” or even another noun “crony,” and add a suffix, such as “-ity” or “-tion” or “-ism.” Finally, when it comes to good writing, don’t take the easy route! creative writing prompts . com ideas for writers

Exercises at Grammar Bytes! Terms of Use You may not alter, sell, or post these materials on a different server. Photocopying for students or linking to materials here does not require my permission. Comma Splices & Fused Sentences Exercise 1 Exercise 2 Exercise 3 Exercise 4 Exercise 5 Even More Practice! Four more exercises for this skill exist in the Grammar Bytes! Back to top ▲ Fragments Exercise 1 Exercise 2 Exercise 3 Exercise 4 Exercise 5 Exercise 6 Exercise 7 Even More Practice! Irregular Verbs Exercise 1 Exercise 2 Exercise 3 Exercise 4 Exercise 5 Exercise 6 Back to top ▲ Parallel Structure Exercise 1 Exercise 2 Exercise 3 Exercise 4 Exercise 5 Interactive Exercise [This exercise was created with Hot Potatoes software.] Misplaced & Dangling Modifiers Exercise 1 Exercise 2 Exercise 3 Exercise 4 Exercise 5 Interactive Exercise [This exercise was created with Hot Potatoes software.] Apostrophes These exercises were created with Hot Potatoes software. Commas Pronoun Agreement Pronoun Case Pronoun Reference Word Choice

Home Page This I Believe | A public dialogue about belief — one essay at a time How to teach writing: writing lesson ideas | TESOL Does any of this sound familiar? Yes, but writing is boring. Is it? Sure, but writing could be time spent in class doing fun speaking tasks. Who said you can’t do both? But my students get more out of class from interactive activities. Exactly – writing lessons don’t have to conform to any of these assumptions. Firstly, written language is permanent. Secondly, well-delivered writing lessons will include multiple stages that focus on interaction and collaboration. Likewise, asking students to peer correct provides another stage in which students can interact in a meaningful and reflective way. Another common query I hear teachers make is in relation to who should do the writing in a writing lesson. So with this in mind, hopefully you are starting to appreciate that writing lessons need not be isolated, dull experiences, and that when the time is used well, there is plenty of benefit to using class time for written work. But how do you stage a writing lesson? 1) Context 2) Who is the text for?

Daily Grammar Archive - Comprehensive Archive of Grammar Lessons This archive contains links to all of our free grammar lessons and quizzes. You can use this archive to study Daily Grammar at your own pace. Lessons 1-90 cover the eight parts of speech, which are verbs, nouns, pronouns, adjectives, adverbs, prepositions, conjunctions, and interjections. Lessons 91-300 cover the parts of the sentence, such as appositives, predicate nominatives, direct objects, prepositional phrases, clauses, and verbals. Lessons 301-440 cover the mechanics of grammar, which is also known as capitalization and punctuation. Lessons 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 - Quiz Lessons 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 - Quiz Lessons 11, 12, 13, 14, 15 - Quiz Lessons 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Quiz Lessons 36, 37, 38, 39, 40 - Quiz Lessons 41, 42, 43, 44, 45 - Quiz Lessons 46, 47, 48, 49, 50 - Quiz Lessons 51, 52, 53, 54, 55 - Quiz Lessons 56, 57, 58, 59, 60 - Quiz Lessons 61, 62, 63, 64, 65 - Quiz Lessons 66, 67, 68, 69, 70 - Quiz

Thesis Statements What is a Thesis Statement? Almost all of us—even if we don’t do it consciously—look early in an essay for a one- or two-sentence condensation of the argument or analysis that is to follow. We refer to that condensation as a thesis statement. Why Should Your Essay Contain a Thesis Statement? to test your ideas by distilling them into a sentence or two to better organize and develop your argument to provide your reader with a “guide” to your argument In general, your thesis statement will accomplish these goals if you think of the thesis as the answer to the question your paper explores. How Can You Write a Good Thesis Statement? Here are some helpful hints to get you started. How to Generate a Thesis Statement if the Topic is Assigned How to Generate a Thesis Statement if the Topic is not Assigned How to Tell a Strong Thesis Statement from a Weak One How to Generate a Thesis Statement if the Topic is Assigned Q: “What are the potential benefits of using computers in a fourth-grade class?”

The Big List of Class Discussion Strategies Listen to this article as a podcast episode: Podcast: Play in new window | Download (Duration: 38:22 — 53.1MB) Subscribe: iTunes | Android | When I worked with student teachers on developing effective lesson plans, one thing I always asked them to revise was the phrase “We will discuss.” We will discuss the video. We will discuss the story. We will discuss our results. Every time I saw it in a lesson plan, I would add a note: “What format will you use? The problem wasn’t them; in most of the classrooms where they’d sat as students, that’s exactly what a class discussion looked like. So here they are: 15 formats for structuring a class discussion to make it more engaging, more organized, more equitable, and more academically challenging. I’ve separated the strategies into three groups. Enjoy! Gallery Walk > a.k.a. Basic Structure: Stations or posters are set up around the classroom, on the walls or on tables. Philosophical Chairs > a.k.a. Pinwheel Discussion > Socratic Seminar > a.k.a. a.k.a.

Related: