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The Reader's Notebook

The Reader's Notebook
Once I did away with the basal many years ago and adopted the Reading Workshop approach in my classroom, I quickly realized that my students needed a place to organize their reading materials, keep track of the books they read, and record the thinking they do about their reading. After trying out a variety of different versions of a Reader's Notebook, including a spiral notebook and a Duo-Tang folder, I finally determined that a binder was the most user-friendly solution. A binder works so well for my readers because it provides them with an efficient way to add new handouts, quickly access information, and easily refer to previous reading responses in the six carefully organized sections of the binder. I can't imagine running my Reading Workshop without having my students maintain a Reader's Notebook. It is in this notebook that students build their reading lives over the course of the year.

http://www.scholastic.com/teachers/top_teaching/2009/11/readers-notebook

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Interactive Notebooks - Joseph Hill's English Classes at Carlmont High School The interactive notebook serves you, the student of literature and language, as a library, a laboratory, and a journal. Like a library, the interactive notebook serves as a storehouse of accumulated knowledge; like a laboratory, it serves as a means to pose meaningful, authentic questions and to seek their answers; like a journal, it serves as a medium both for personalizing knowledge and for reflection and as a means to foster intellectual and social growth and to develop excellent habits of mind. The interactive notebook will prove an invaluable tool in your quest to meet the goals of the course as they are articulated in the California standards for English and language arts and in the course description. How and why does the interactive notebook work?

Comprehension Why Use Reading A-Z for Comprehension Resources Reading A-Z's Comprehension resources support students' learning beyond Foundational Skills and give students the tools necessary to switch from learning to read to reading to learn. How to Use Comprehension Resources Use Comprehension resources to introduce skills to your whole class, for direct and explicit re-teaching of a skill, or for deep exploration of a key question through close reading. Other Comprehension Resources Literature Circle Models After experimenting for many years, I discovered an approach that's easy, fun, and effective. I refer to it as Classroom Book Clubs because it's a more relaxed method of doing Literature Circles that doesn't involve roles. You can view a narrated slidecast to this model by scrolling down to the Classroom Book Clubs section. On this page you can also learn about different types of Literature Circles.

Reader's Workshop This website is designed and maintained by Karen A. McDavid © 2004. Ideas, content, activities, and documents for this website are copyrighted by Karen A. McDavid and should not be copied or downloaded without permission. All graphics seen throughout this website should not be removed, copied, or downloaded. You may download the banner below with a link back to this site. Reading and Wriitng Notebook FAQ I just started reading The Cafe Book yesterday by The Sisters and I am already so excited to make some changes in my classroom because of it. You can bet that I will be doing some serious posting about it during the next month as I begin to launch it in my classroom. I got a really great email from Lindsay today and thought I would answer her questions on the blog about my reading and writing notebooks.

Interactive Notebooks « Teaching Social Studies Teaching Social Studies and Language Arts a teacher exploring integration Interactive Notebooks My most popular posts seem to be on the implementation of the Interactive Notebook strategy. Legend of the Trojan War (Beware of Greeks Bearing Gifts) - Ancient Greece for Kids Ancient Greece for Kids There is an old saying - Beware of Greeks bearing gifts. This saying comes from the legend of the Trojan Horse. As the story goes ...... Literature Circles Structure: Grades 2-3 In my classroom, literature circles are called "Book Clubs." The components of book clubs include choosing a book, reading the book, discussing the book, writing in your journal, and sharing the book by doing an extension project. This is how I begin the year: 1. Synthesize Strategy lessons: Synthesize Students stop often while reading to synthesize the information gained from texts to form opinions, cite evidence to support their conclusions, change perspectives, develop new ideas, and, in general, enhance a personal understanding of the concepts presented in a text. Learning targets I can explain the difference between retelling, summarizing, and synthesizing. I can read independently and determine my opinion.

37 Ways Teachers Can Use Pinterest In The Classroom 37 Ways Teachers Can Use Pinterest In The Classroom There are a lot of great technology tools out there for teachers that can make it easier to connect with other educators, get ideas for classroom activities, and find inspiration. One of the newest and best of these online tools is Pinterest, which has quickly become a favorite among educators. Using online “pinboards” teachers can save everything from photos to blog posts in one easily accessible and usable place. Educators who are curious about Pinterest should sign up for an invitation today (it’s still invite only, but it doesn’t take long to get an invitation) and start creating their own amazing collections of pins. Not sure where to start?

Thoughtful Logs You will notice on our blog that my students use amazing learning tools called Thoughtful Logs. Many of you have emailed asking for more information about Thoughtful Logs - what they are, how to use them, etc. I figured I'd just post the information here with pictures to help answer your questions. Dr. Seuss Went to War by Richard H. Minear Dr. Seuss (Theodor Seuss Geisel, 1904-1991) was a life-long cartoonist: in high school in Springfield, Massachusetts; in college at Dartmouth (Class of 1925); as an adman in New York City before World War II; in his many children's books, beginning with To Think That I Saw it on Mulberry Street (1937). Because of the fame of his children's books (and because we often misunderstand these books) and because his political cartoons have remained largely unknown, we do not think of Dr. Seuss as a political cartoonist.

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