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20 Simple Assessment Strategies You Can Use Every Day

20 Simple Assessment Strategies You Can Use Every Day
20 Simple Assessment Strategies You Can Use Every Day by Saga Briggs The ultimate goal of teaching is understanding. But sometimes it’s easier to talk than to teach, as we all know, especially when we need to cover a lot of material in a short amount of time. We hope students will understand, if not now then before test time, and we keep our fingers crossed that their results will indicate we’ve done our job. The problem is, we often rely on these tests to measure understanding and then we move on. Below are 22 simple assessment strategies and tips to help you become more frequent in your teaching, planning, and curriculum design. 22 Simple Assessment Strategies & Tips You Can Use Every Day 1. Avoid yes/no questions and phrases like “Does this make sense?” 2. During the last five minutes of class ask students to reflect on the lesson and write down what they’ve learned. 3. Give a short quiz at the end of class to check for comprehension. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18.

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PassNote Why it Works Students receiving constructive feedback from faculty report gains in problem solving and communication skills. Feedback perceived as encouraging and aiding in student development tends to be more effective. 5 Excellent Rubric Making Tools for Teachers June 18, 2016 Rubrics are scoring charts used to assess and evaluate a particular learning or teaching activity. As is explained in this guide, rubrics are helpful for both teachers and students: teachers can use them when designing lesson plans and grading assignments; students can use them to make sure they meet the learning expectations and requirements of an assignment or project work. Rubric making should not be a complicated task, it should only speak to the core requirements of a given task while channeling focus to the learning outcomes.

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MakingLearningVisibleResources - Ladder of Feedback Ladder of Feedback Guide for Classroom ObservationsThe "Ladder of Feedback”* is a protocol or structure that establishes a culture of trust and constructive support by sequencing feedback in order that is constructive. The idea or plan is presented to the group. Then the group moves through the following steps (moving from one rung of the ladder to the next):Step 1: Clarify Ask clarifying questions to be sure you understand the idea or matter on the table. Avoid clarifying questions that are thinly disguised criticism.Step 2: Value Express what you like about the idea or matter at hand in specific terms. Do not offer perfunctory “good, but,” and hurry on to the negatives.Step 3: State concerns State your puzzles and concerns.

Teaching with Translation: A Journey from L2 to L1 in the Classroom Translation a skill that constitutes a real world demand, and yet, it is rather underrated in Brazil while it is broadly used in countries like Japan and China, for example. Despite its disadvantages — such as giving students the false impression that there is always a one-to-one correspondence between L1 and L2, for example, it offers learners the chance to practice it as a skill that is necessary in a large number of situations such as translating a text to a non-English speaker or working as an interpreter for conferences. However, translation is not to be confused with the grammar-translation method, whose goal was to learn a language in order to read its literature (Richards and Rodgers, 2008). Nowadays, approaches to translation should have a communicative purpose and resemble real life activities rather than focus solely on reading and writing texts out of context.

How Can We Make Assessments Meaningful? I think meaningful assessments can come in many shapes and sizes. In fact, to be thoroughly engaging and to draw the best work out of the students, assessments should come in different formats. Thankfully, with the Common Core standards exemplifying the 4Cs -- Creativity and Critical Thinking (through performance-based assessments), Collaboration, and Communication (through the use of interdisciplinary writing) -- we are looking at a more fluid future in testing formats. As long as the format itself is aligned with real-world skills, a meaningful assessment does not need to be lockstep with a particular structure any more. When I think about my own definition of a "meaningful assessment," I think the test must meet certain requirements. The assessment must have value other than "because it's on the test."

Examples of Formative Assessment When incorporated into classroom practice, the formative assessment process provides information needed to adjust teaching and learning while they are still happening. The process serves as practice for the student and a check for understanding during the learning process. The formative assessment process guides teachers in making decisions about future instruction. Here are a few examples that may be used in the classroom during the formative assessment process to collect evidence of student learning. Observations Questioning

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