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Improving Assessment and Placement at California’s Community Colleges. By Olga Rodríguez Every year, California’s community colleges identify hundreds of thousands of students as not ready for transfer-level courses in math and English.

Improving Assessment and Placement at California’s Community Colleges

Since these courses are required to transfer to a four-year college, students deemed underprepared are placed in developmental (also known as remedial or basic-skills) courses to prepare for college work. Multiple Measures for College Placement – Community College Data. By Alexandros M.

Multiple Measures for College Placement – Community College Data

Goudas April 2017 A pattern is developing in the recent community college reform movements sweeping the nation. Researchers publish studies claiming a certain component of higher education is not working well, and in these studies they propose data-based solutions. Then due to various reasons, institutions implement those solutions in ways different from the original recommendations. The Schoenblog: Student Reflections & Self-Assessments. Instead of spending my time on grading, I want to use it to give stronger feedback, help students grow, and build better relationships.

The Schoenblog: Student Reflections & Self-Assessments

These are ideas I’ve mentioned over and over in the past few months of writing, and I’m ready to bring them to practice. Multiple Measures Assessment Project. The Multiple Measures Assessment Project (MMAP) is a collaborative effort led by the RP Group and Educational Results Partnerships’ Cal-PASS Plus system, with support from the CCCCO.

Multiple Measures Assessment Project

It has three primary objectives: MMAP is engaged with 28 (and counting) pilot colleges from across the state that are providing feedback on the predictive models and user tools to help inform the process. Visit the pages listed below to find numerous practical tools for implementing multiple measures as well as publications, presentations, webinars, etc. produced by the project. Common Assessment Initiative (CAI): School Testing 2016: Same Tests, Different Stakes : NPR Ed. Oivind Hovland/Ikon Images/Corbis It has been a high-stakes year for high-stakes standardized tests.

School Testing 2016: Same Tests, Different Stakes : NPR Ed

The debate over renewing the big federal education law turned, in part, on whether annual testing would remain a federal mandate. Republicans initially said no, Democrats said yes. Ultimately the overhaul passed with tests still in place. On the other hand, this fall President Obama addressed parents on Facebook and released a "Testing Action Plan. " Meanwhile some parents, notably in New York state, opted out of the tests and made a lot of noise about it. The arguments for annual student testing come down to accountability and equity. The outstanding question is whether it's possible to reform school testing in a way that gets schools, parents and leaders the data they need, while avoiding the problem the president is talking about: an overemphasis on testing. Cal State Coming Clean About Math Test's Limitations 

California State University has done many things right in the twenty years since it became one of the nation's first universities to take on the challenge of remedial education.

Cal State Coming Clean About Math Test's Limitations 

For example, it developed a widely-lauded eleventh-grade readiness assessment now being replicated around the country to help students catch up academically during their senior year of high school and avoid remedial courses in college. It's hard to understand, therefore, why the university would be anything but candid about how it measures students' proficiency in math and English. But according to a 2010 study that recently came to light, the placement test required for entering CSU students does not predict whether students can succeed in college-level math. Scores on that test, the Elementary-Level Mathematics Test or ELM, send nearly 20,000 new CSU admits to remedial math courses when they get to campus each fall (or during the preceding summer). Here's what happened when these colleges ditched SAT scores - Sep. 8, 2015.

A growing number of schools -- about 850 and counting -- no longer require applicants to submit their scores.

Here's what happened when these colleges ditched SAT scores - Sep. 8, 2015

And college officials say that a test-optional policy helps them attract strong applicants that may not have previously applied -- including students of color, and those from low income families. Data shows tests like the SAT are biased against students from low-income households. Poorer students tend to perform worse on the test. The difference might be the costly prep courses, books and tutors, some experts say.

Blacks and Hispanics also consistently score lower on the SAT than whites. The new thinking is that dropping the SAT requirement might encourage more low-income students to apply. While the academic research is mixed, some of the schools that implemented the policy early on have seen big changes in their student bodies. Related: George Washington University is ditching SATs. 7 Things to Remember About Feedback - Eli Review. College Applicants Sweat The SATs. Perhaps They Shouldn't. Standardized tests are an important consideration for admissions at many colleges and universities.

College Applicants Sweat The SATs. Perhaps They Shouldn't

But one new study shows that high school performance, not standardized test scores, is a better predictor of how students do in college. Amriphoto/iStockphoto hide caption itoggle caption Amriphoto/iStockphoto Standardized tests are an important consideration for admissions at many colleges and universities. But one new study shows that high school performance, not standardized test scores, is a better predictor of how students do in college. Art%3A10.1007%2Fs11251-011-9177-2.pdf?originUrl=