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Motivating speaking activities for lower levels

Planning time has been shown to increase production in speaking tasks. Lower level learners often find it especially difficult to speak spontaneously, so these activities incorporate ‘thinking time’ during which learners can prepare for speaking by planning what they are going to say, and asking the teacher or using a dictionary to look up missing vocabulary. The following activities are relatively short, with minimal materials preparation time for the teacher. They are designed for use as a warmer or a filler in the middle or at the end of a class. Definitions lists This activity is good for activating existing vocabulary or revising vocabulary studied in previous lessons. Procedure: Choose a vocabulary topic (this can be vocabulary you have recently studied or a topic you want to introduce). A faster moving, fun alternative to this activity is a team game. What were you doing...? Adjectives This is a variation on the above activity and is great for practising adjectives. Procedure:

https://www.teachingenglish.org.uk/article/motivating-speaking-activities-lower-levels

Related:  ESL ORAL ACTIVITIESESLSpeakingSpeakingalessiatosi

The Best Sites To Practice Speaking English This was one of the trickiest “The Best…” list for me to compile. As I was going through my favorites, and all of the great suggestions others contributed, I concluded that it might work best to really create two lists. The first list — this one — will highlight sites that actually have students recording their own voices in a number of different ways and post their speaking assignments online. The second list, which I’ll publish later this month and will include a number of the sites that readers suggested, will focus on sites where students have to listen to spoken examples for developing better pronunciation skills. That next list will be called “The Best Sites For Learning English Pronunciation.”

Where did English come from? - Claire Bowern There are two other TED-Ed lessons related to this topic: How languages evolve and How did English evolve? (a lesson that fills in some of the details that we omit here due to the fact that the focus of this lesson was further in the past). There is still a great deal of debate about Indo-European, most importantly about the location of the homeland. To read more about this debate, there are classic books by Mallory and Renfrew, as well more recent works by Anthony. Then, read these articles by Bouckaert et al. At the same site, watch this movie that shows one hypothesis about how Indo-European languages expanded.

List of Conversation Topics One of the most frustrating things I have ever experienced around a girl, is if I and her run out of things to talk about. Since you found this post I assume you know what I’m talking about, and maybe you are interested in learning how to avoid awkward silence. I’m thinking about the teeth pooling moments where the awkward silence just takes over the situation, you are just sitting their smiling while desperately in your mind scrambling for something just mildly interesting say, but you just can think of anything, you mind is a total black out, you can’t even remember your own name at this point. Finally you hear yourself saying something completely uninteresting, like: “sooo.. do you come here often”, she says “no its my first time!” And then the conversation dries up once again, the awkward silence start to eat you both up from the inside until one of you can’t stand the social pressure and thus make up some excuse to leave. Talk about Past Experiences:

10 Intriguing Photographs to Teach Close Reading and Visual Thinking Skills Photo Ever want your students to slow down and notice details when they read — whether they’re perusing a book, a poem, a map or a political cartoon? Young people often want to hurry up and make meaning via a quick skim or a cursory glance when a text can demand patience and focus. Closely reading any text, whether written or visual, requires that students proceed more slowly and methodically, noticing details, making connections and asking questions. This takes practice. But it certainly helps when students want to read the text.

A few more myths about speakers of multiple languages Does multilingualism cause language delays and identity problems? The British Council's Nayr Ibrahim busts a few more myths about speakers of multiple languages. Myth: Multilingualism causes language delay Raising children bilingually is sometimes believed to cause language delay. This misconception is based on a separate underlying proficiency (SUP) hypothesis. This theory, now discredited, suggests that languages are stored in separate compartments or containers, which represent half the capacity of the monolingual brain. useful interview expressions game useful interview expressions: Practice useful interview expressions game using this ESL fun Game.This game is also excellent for classroom teaching. Teachers can engage students in a classroom vocabulary or grammar review. It is suitable for intermediate and advanced esl learners. It can be used to energize a dull class, to review work that was done or simply as a reward for good classroom work. Have fun teaching and learning English! Games are great for motivating students to learn.

Study shows that people who speak two languages have more efficient brains (Bigstock) By Tanya Lewis November 18, 2014 People who speak two languages may have brains that are more efficient at language processing and other tasks, new research suggests. Conversation Questions for the ESL/EFL Classroom If this is your first time here, then read the Teacher's Guide to Using These PagesIf you can think of a good question for any list, please send it to us. Home | Articles | Lessons | Techniques | Questions | Games | Jokes | Things for Teachers | Links | Activities for ESL Students Would you like to help? If you can think of a good question for any list, please send it to us. If you would like to suggest another topic, please send it and a set of questions to begin the topic. Copyright © 1997-2010 by The Internet TESL Journal Pages from this site should not be put online elsewhere.Permission is not required to link directly to any page on our site as long as you do not trap the page inside a frame.

Related:  Communication