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The Oatmeal - Comics

The Oatmeal - Comics
This is a grammar comic about the proper usage of who versus whom. A look at the meaning of "flushing out an idea." This comic will LITERALLY make butterflies explode out of your underpants. A guide explaining when to use i.e. instead of e.g. A little bit ironic, dontcha think? The most feared punctuation on earth. The right way to use an apostrophe (in illustrated form). All artwork and content on this site is Copyright © 2016 Matthew Inman.

http://theoatmeal.com/tag/grammar

Related:  Literacy

Literably Is An Excellent Reading Site — If Used With Caution Reader Erika Chapman tipped me off to an excellent site called Literably. It allows students to read a text and have it automatically assessed for accuracy and words-per-minute speed. Plus, and this is what was most surprising to me, it also provides a fairly accurate indentification of student errors — in other words, what word they said instead of the word in the text. You’re able to provide the student or parent a link to the recording.

Books Read The Biggest and Brightest Light For Ages: 4-7 Reverse Dictionary <div id="needs_javascript"><center><b>Note: The new Reverse Dictionary requires JavaScript.</b><br /><img src="/img/a.gif?q=omg_a_user_without_js"> If you have disabled JavaScript in your browser, please <a href=" it for this site</a> or use the <a href="/? Parallel Structure Summary: This handout describes and provides examples of parallel structure (similar patterns of words). Contributors:Dana Lynn DriscollLast Edited: 2013-03-22 09:01:32

Friday Fun Archive Students worked hard all week? Do they deserve a special reward for a job well done? The lesson and project ideas below are meant to fill the bill for Friday afternoon fun and learning. Some are simple games or activities that will reinforce skills as they offer a nice break from structured learning. Others are project ideas to be completed over multiple Friday afternoons. Click a link below to explore any idea in more detail.

Teach Children ESL - Games Title: Pond Jump! - Board Game Description: FULL GAME SET!!! Includes cards, markers, etc. Important Infrequently Used Words To Know Paul V. Hartman (The Capitalized syllable gets the emphasis) alacrity a-LACK-ra-tee cheerful willingness and promptnessanathema a-NATH-a-ma a thing or person cursed, banned, or reviledanodyne AN-a-dine not likely to cause offence or disagreement and somewhat dull//anything that sooths or comfortsaphorism AFF-oar-ism a short, witty saying or concise principleapostate ah-POSS-tate (also: apostasy) person who has left the fold or deserted the faith.arrogate ARROW-gate to make an unreasonable claimatavistic at-a-VIS-tic reverting to a primitive typeavuncular a-VUNC-you-lar “like an uncle”; benevolent bathos BATH-ose an anticlimaxbereft ba-REFT to be deprived of something valuable “He was bereft of reason.”

Subject/Verb Agreement Summary: Ever get "subject/verb agreement" as an error on a paper? This handout will help you understand this common grammar problem. Contributors:Joshua M. Paiz, Chris Berry, Allen BrizeeLast Edited: 2014-04-01 10:34:43 This handout gives you several guidelines to help your subjects and verbs agree. SMART Teaching Strategies Sentences are key units for expressing ideas. Students in Stage 1 are using sentence structure in their writing to compose longer texts that achieve the intended purpose. Students at this stage need to use compound and some complex sentences for expressing connected and elaborated ideas in writing. Strategy Explicit Teaching

ESL Games Welcome to EnglishClub ESL Games, where you can have fun and improve your English at the same time. Vocabulary Games Matching games, jumbled sentence games, jumbled word games, Hangman games and more to test your knowledge of words. 45 ways to avoid using the word 'very' Writers Write is your one-stop resource for writers. Use these 45 ways to avoid using the word ‘very’ to improve your writing. Good writers avoid peppering their writing with qualifiers like ‘very’ and ‘really’.

A Picture of Language Joe Mortis Draft is a series about the art and craft of writing. The curious art of diagramming sentences was invented 165 years ago by S.W. Clark, a schoolmaster in Homer, N.Y. [1] His book, published in 1847, was called “A Practical Grammar: In which Words, Phrases, and Sentences Are Classified According to Their Offices and Their Various Relations to One Another.” His goal was to simplify the teaching of English grammar. It was more than 300 pages long, contained information on such things as unipersonal verbs and “rhetorico-grammatical figures,” and provided a long section on Prosody, which he defined as “that part of the Science of Language which treats of utterance.”

Related:  grammar