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What Is 5G? The Next-generation Network Fully Explained. It’s been nearly a decade in the making, but 5G is finally becoming a reality.

What Is 5G? The Next-generation Network Fully Explained

Carriers started rolling out fixed 5G to select cities a few years ago, and mobile 5G has already made appearances in cities around the country, with a much more comprehensive rollout expected over the next few years. Yet, it may seem as though there are more questions about 5G than there are answers. Some wonder where 5G is available, and if they’ll ever see it in their city; others are more interested in which 5G smartphone they should buy (here are a few ideas). And of course, there is the debate about which carrier will have the best 5G service. You have questions, we have answers. See also: The latest news about 5G What is 5G? Before we explain how 5G works, it’s probably a good idea to explain what 5G is.

The Terrifying Potential of the 5G Network. In January, 2018, Robert Spalding, the senior director for strategic planning at the National Security Council, was in his office at the Eisenhower Executive Office Building, across the street from the White House, when he saw a breaking-news alert on the Axios Web site.

The Terrifying Potential of the 5G Network

“Scoop,” the headline read, “Trump Team Considers Nationalizing 5G Network.” At the time, Spalding, a brigadier general in the Air Force who previously served as a defense attaché in Beijing, had been in the military for nearly three decades. At the N.S.C., he was studying ways to insure that the next generation of Internet connectivity, what is commonly referred to as 5G, can be made secure from cyberattacks. “I wasn’t looking at this from a policy perspective,” he said. “It was about the physics, about what was possible.” Two words explain the difference between our current wireless networks and 5G: speed and latency. 5G—if you believe the hype—is expected to be up to a hundred times faster.

Low-Band to mmWave: The Different Types of 5G and How They Work. If you’ve been keeping up on news about the next generation of wireless technology, 5G, you’ve likely come across the terms “low-band,” “mid-band,” and “millimeter wave” in your reading.

Low-Band to mmWave: The Different Types of 5G and How They Work

But what do those terms actually mean? The answer provides a good overview of how 5G works, so we break it down in this guide to the different types of 5G. If you want a full overview of 5G — from what it is to how it will be used — check out our in-depth explainer. How radio wave spectrum works Low-band, mid-band, and millimeter wave all refer to different segments of the electromagnetic spectrum. U.S. 5G spectrum bands Low-band: 600MHz, 800MHz, 900MHz Mid-band: 2.5GHz, 3.5GHz, 3.7-4.2GHz Millimeter wave (high-band): 24GHz, 28GHz, 37GHz, 39GHz, 47GHz *Information courtesy of FCC. In the radio wave range of the spectrum, things are pretty crowded. The importance of millimeter wave Real world expectations So what does all this mean? As for 5G on mid-bands and low-bands, improvements will be more incremental.

EU 5G Appeal – Scientists warn of potential serious health effects of 5G – JRS Eco Wireless. In an appeal to the European Union, more than 180 scientists and doctors from 36 countries warn about the danger of 5G, which will lead to a massive increase in involuntary exposure to electromagnetic radiation.

EU 5G Appeal – Scientists warn of potential serious health effects of 5G – JRS Eco Wireless

The scientists urge the EU to follow Resolution 1815 of the Council of Europe, asking for an independent task force to reassess the health effects. “We, the undersigned scientists, recommend a moratorium on the roll-out of the fifth generation, 5G, for telecommunication until potential hazards for human health and the environment have been fully investigated by scientists independent from industry. 5G will substantially increase exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) on top of the 2G, 3G, 4G, WiFi etc. for telecommunications already in place. RF-EMF has been proven to be harmful for humans and the environment.” MEDIALIST. Everything You Need to Know About 5G. Today’s mobile users want faster data speeds and more reliable service.

Everything You Need to Know About 5G

The next generation of wireless networks—5G—promises to deliver that, and much more. With 5G, users should be able to download a high-definition film in under a second (a task that could take 10 minutes on 4G LTE). And wireless engineers say these networks will boost the development of other new technologies, too, such as autonomous vehicles, virtual reality, and the Internet of Things. If all goes well, telecommunications companies hope to debut the first commercial 5G networks in the early 2020s. Right now, though, 5G is still in the planning stages, and companies and industry groups are working together to figure out exactly what it will be. To achieve this, wireless engineers are designing a suite of brand-new technologies. At the moment, it’s not yet clear which technologies will do the most for 5G in the long run, but a few early favorites have emerged. Millimeter Waves Small Cells Massive MIMO Beamforming. GADGETRY. Privatus. Crowd Sh.Out.

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