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Aeneas. Henry Livingston, Jr. Henry Livingston, Jr.

Henry Livingston, Jr.

(October 13, 1748 - February 29, 1828) has been proposed as being the uncredited author of the poem "A Visit from St. Nicholas", more popularly known (after its first line) as "The Night Before Christmas. " The poem has always been attributed to Clement Clarke Moore, and the Livingston claim is hotly disputed. Biography[edit] He was born on October 13, 1748 in Poughkeepsie, New York, to Henry Livingston, Sr. and Susannah Conklin.[1] Clement Clarke Moore. Clement Clarke Moore (July 15, 1779 – July 10, 1863) was an American Professor of Oriental and Greek Literature, as well as Divinity and Biblical Learning, at the General Theological Seminary of the Protestant Episcopal Church, in New York City.

Clement Clarke Moore

Located on land donated by the "Bard of Chelsea" himself, the seminary still stands today on Ninth Avenue between 20th and 21st Streets, in an area known as Chelsea Square. Moore's connection with that institution continued for over twenty-five years. He is the author of the yuletide poem "A Visit from St. Nicholas", which later became famous as "'Twas the Night Before Christmas". Life and career[edit] One of Moore's earliest known works was an anonymous pro-Federalist pamphlet published prior to the 1804 presidential election, attacking the religious views of Thomas Jefferson (the incumbent president and Democratic-Republican candidate).[3] His polemic, titled in full Observations upon Certain Passages in Mr. Star of Bethlehem. Adoration of the Magi by Florentine painter Giotto di Bondone (1267–1337).

Star of Bethlehem

Santa Claus's reindeer. Santa Claus and seven of his reindeer in a parade in Toronto 2007.

Santa Claus's reindeer

Santa Claus's reindeer form an imaginary team of flying reindeer traditionally held to pull the sleigh of Santa Claus and help him deliver Christmas gifts. The commonly cited names of the reindeer are Dasher, Dancer, Prancer, Vixen, Comet, Cupid, Donner, and Blitzen. They are based on those used in the 1823 poem "A Visit from St. Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer. Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer is a fictional male reindeer with a glowing red nose, popularly known as "Santa's 9th Reindeer.

Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer

" When depicted, he is the lead reindeer pulling Santa's sleigh on Christmas Eve. The luminosity of his nose is so great that it illuminates the team's path through inclement winter weather. Rudolph first appeared in a 1939 booklet written by Robert L. May and published by Montgomery Ward.[1][2][3] Publication history[edit] Robert L. Paganism (contemporary) Modern paganism, also known as contemporary paganism, and neopaganism, is a group of contemporary religious movements influenced by or claiming to be derived from the various historical pagan beliefs of pre-modern Europe.

Paganism (contemporary)

Although they do share commonalities, contemporary Pagan religious movements are diverse and no single set of beliefs, practices, or texts are shared by them all. Contemporary Paganism has been characterised by Dennis Carpenter as "a synthesis of historical inspiration and present-day creativity",[5] in this manner drawing influences from pre-Christian, folkloric and ethnographic sources in order to fashion new religious movements. Terminology and definition[edit] A Slavic Rodnover ritual in modern Russia. Slavic Rodnovery is an ethnic religion that attempts to recreate forms of Slavic polytheism. The term "neo-pagan" was coined in the 19th century in reference to Renaissance and Romanticist Hellenophile classical revivalism. Horned God.

The term Horned God itself predates Wicca, and is an early 20th-century syncretic term for a horned or antlered anthropomorphic god with pseudohistorical origins[4] who, according to Margaret Murray's 1921 The Witch-Cult in Western Europe, was the deity worshipped by a pan-European witchcraft-based cult, and was demonized into the form of the Devil by the Mediaeval Church.

Horned God

The Horned God has been explored within several psychological theories, and has become a recurrent theme in fantasy literature.[5]:872. Triple Goddess. Mistletoe. Mistletoe in the genus Viscum[edit] The name mistletoe was originally applied to Viscum album (European mistletoe, of the family Santalaceae in the order Santalales), the only species native in Great Britain and much of Europe.

Mistletoe

European mistletoe is readily recognized by its smooth-edged oval evergreen leaves borne in pairs along the woody stem, and waxy white berries in dense clusters of two to six. It is a poisonous plant that causes acute gastrointestinal problems including stomach pain and diarrhea along with low pulse.[1] The genus Viscum is not native to North America, but Viscum album has been introduced to California.[2] Other mistletoe groups[edit] Later the name mistletoe was further extended to other related species and even families, including Phoradendron serotinum, the eastern mistletoe of eastern North America.

Life cycle[edit] Mistletoe. Prose Edda. The Prose Edda, also known as the Younger Edda, Snorri's Edda (Icelandic: Snorra Edda) or simply Edda, is an Old Norse compilation made in Iceland in the early 13th century.

Prose Edda

Together with the Poetic Edda, it comprises the major store of pagan Scandinavian mythology. The work is often assumed to have been written, or at least compiled, by the Icelandic scholar and historian Snorri Sturluson around the year 1220. The Prose Edda was originally referred to as simply the Edda, but was later called the Prose Edda to distinguish it from the Poetic Edda, a collection of anonymous poetry from earlier traditional sources compiled around the same time as the Prose Edda in 13th century Iceland.[2] The Prose Edda is related to the Poetic Edda in that the Prose Edda cites various poems collected in the Poetic Edda as sources.[3] Authorship[edit] This book is called Edda. Etymology[edit] Yule. Yule or Yuletide ("Yule time") is a pagan religious festival observed by the historical Germanic peoples, later being absorbed into and equated with the Christian festival of Christmas.

Yule

The earliest references to Yule are by way of indigenous Germanic month names Ærra Jéola (Before Yule) or Jiuli and Æftera Jéola (After Yule). Scholars have connected the celebration to the Wild Hunt, the god Odin and the pagan Anglo-Saxon Modranicht. Terms with an etymological equivalent to Yule are used in the Nordic countries for Christmas with its religious rites, but also for the holidays of this season. Yule is also used to a lesser extent in English-speaking countries to refer to Christmas.