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Using Echinacea

Although echinacea is used to fight many different ailments, it is most commonly used to boost the immune system and fight infection. To find out more about making tinctures, salves, syrups, antiseptics, sprays, and many other simple remedies, see Growing and Using Echinacea by Kathleen Brown. This little booklet contains a wealth of information about Echinacea, and costs only $3.95. There are two ways to brew an herbal tea: Infusion and Decoction. Use the infusion method when preparing a tea from leaves, flowers or seeds. Decoction is the method of choice for roots. To make an infusion: Place 1-2 teaspoons of dried herb or 2-4 teaspoons of fresh herb in a teapot. To make a decoction: Combine 2 teaspoons of dried root and 1 cup of water in a saucepan. Below are two tea recipes excerpted from Growing and Using Echinacea by Kathleen Brown. The herbs in this formula all have active antiviral properties and are effective against herpes, shingles, flu, warts, and other viral infections.

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Medicinal Uses of Bee Balm Bee Balm is a plant that was used often, both medicinally and as a beverage by American Indians and by the European settlers in America. Oswego Tea, made from the leaves of the plant, was a staple in households during colonial times after the settlers lost access to English teas after the Boston Tea Party. Today, Bee Balm is still used widely for a variety of medicinal purposes, and limited testing has shown that it does have some benefits as a remedy for quite a few common medical complaints. As a member of the Mint family, it is no surprise that Bee Balm taken in a tea (Oswego Tea) is a tasty, well-known remedy for digestive problems, a trait seen in almost all Mint family members. Health Benefits Of Parsley, One of Nature's Top Antioxidant Foods Parsley has much more use than just being a decorative garnish on your plate. Parsley is actually a storehouse of nutrients that features a delicious green and vibrant taste. The health benefits of parsley come from two components — its volatile oils and antioxidants called flavonoids. It's a little-known fact that herbs (and spices) such as parsley have far greater concentrations of antioxidants than any common fruit or vegetable source. Herbs also contain a particularly wide variety of antioxidants as well, making them one of the top antioxidant foods around.

Growing Echinacea Echinacea, popularly known as coneflower, has created a sensation among those who like to dabble in herbal healing. German medical studies have proven that echinacea does indeed boost the immune system, and is useful in treating a number of common ailments. We'll talk more about using echinacea medicinally In Using Echinacea, but first, let's get it growing. The good news for gardeners is that echinacea is not only useful, it's also a beautiful addition to your perennial beds and borders, and is hardy even in very cold climates. The only thing echinacea can be somewhat fussy about is too much moisture. It likes a fairly dry soil, and should never have to sit very long with it's roots in wet, soggy soil.

Food Foraging: Find Wild Edible Plants - Mother Earth News We owe a lasting debt of gratitude to the desperate soul who “discovered” the oyster or stewed that first possum. In the early, hit-or-miss days of foraging, our ancestors learned the hard way about the laxative properties of the senna plant, and to eat only the stems of rhubarb and not the poisonous leaves. Through trial and the occasional fatal error, we sorted the edible from the inedible, the useful from the harmful. After World War II, when American agriculture was fully conquered by industry and supermarkets full of frozen foods popped up across the land — yes, like weeds — foraging came to be regarded as uncouth, probably unhealthy and certainly out of step with modern times. Why then, a half-century later, do we find purslane — a vigorous, succulent “weed” once routinely cursed by gardeners — on the menu of nearly every fine dining restaurant in the country?

27 Medicinal Plants Worth Your Garden Space Playful as kids are, accidents happen. And the accident that befallen me at 7 years old was the feeling of the hot exhaust pipe of a motorcycle kissing the skin of my leg. Grandma was around and saw it. Immediately, she took out a knife and slice the thick lower part of the aloe vera plant by the garden and rubbed the exposed end on the burn. Looking back, I realized that it was important to have medicinal plants around the house cause you never know when you might need them.

Hill Country Herbalist: Harvesting Red Clover Blossoms and Making Them Into Tincture Red Clover (Trifolium pratense)typically doesn't grow in Texas, but it was growing on Maypop Farms. The blossoms are edible and have a neutral, sweet, and satisfying taste. They have an affinity for the salivary glands causing slight stimulation, which is helpful in quenching thirst (Wood 1997). The flowers can be dried or used fresh to make an herbal tea infusion. It's long been considered a blood cleanser and can be used to support the reproductive system and the liver. Top 10… Foods To Forage - Green Living Thanks to modern agricultural methods, foraging – once a part of the majority’s daily life – has faded away, replaced by regular trips to the supermarket instead. Recently, however, there has been a revival of interest in raiding nature’s larder thanks to increased awareness of the health benefits of wild food, not to mention the TV exploits of Bear Grylls, Ray Mears and co. But it foraging is about more than just food. It gets us out into the countryside and helps to cultivate an intimate appreciation of nature, re-establishing a connection severed by modern urban life. But for the beginner, foraging should come with a health warning as it’s easy to mistake a deadly fungus for an innocent field mushroom. While wild food is generally good for you, taking precautions and getting some tips and advice from experienced foragers is essential.

Amazing Moringa: Medicinal, Edible and Easy to Grow By Ansel Oommen Guest Writer for Wake Up World The Moringa Tree, also known as the Drumstick tree is nearly entirely edible. It has many medicinal applications, can grow with little water, has multiple times the amount of nutrients as oranges, carrots, spinach and bananas, and grows extremely well in regions where of malnutrition. Could this tree solve the world’s food crisis? In the foothills of the Himalayas in northern India, a certain tree has long graced the region with its miraculous fruit.

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Creating a Healing Garden - 9 Healing Herbs You Can Grow Yourself By Gaye Levy Guest writer for Wake Up World Herbs have been used for centuries to soothe and to heal. According to Wikipedia: Herbs have long been used as the basis of traditional Chinese herbal medicine, with usage dating as far back as the first century CE and before. Medicinal use of herbs in Western cultures has its roots in the Hippocratic (Greek) elemental healing system, based on a quaternary elemental healing metaphor.

A Tree A Day The sole extant species in the genus Jubaea, a member of the palm family Arecaceae, is Jubaea chilensis, otherwise known as the Chilean wine palm. It is native to South America and endemic to a small area of central Chile. For those lucky enough to be familiar with this tree it is usually considered to be one of the most impressive palms in the world. It is a slow growing, single-stemmed palm with an impressive, and massive trunk, up to three feet thick, and intricately criss-crossed with the scars of old leaf bases.

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