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Top 10 sites to help students check their facts. Supermoons Cause Tidal Waves—True or False? Our news literacy program challenges fourth graders to find out. “Last week scientists at NASA announced that they will send a manned spacecraft to the moon by the year 2018.”

Supermoons Cause Tidal Waves—True or False? Our news literacy program challenges fourth graders to find out.

“Supermoons can trigger tidal waves and catastrophic earthquakes.” “A rare liger cub with a lion dad and tigress mother was born in Russia.” Only one of these news headlines is real. Can you tell which one? Top 10 sites to help students check their facts. How to outsmart fake news in your Facebook feed. It doesn't have to be this way.

How to outsmart fake news in your Facebook feed

Fake news is actually really easy to spot -- if you know how. Consider this your New Media Literacy Guide. 1. Does the story come from a strange URL? Zimdars says sites with strange suffixes like ".co" or ".su," or that are hosted by third party platforms like WordPress should raise a red flag. 10 Ways to Spot a Fake News Article - EasyBib Blog. For many of us, 2016 is going down as a year to forget.

10 Ways to Spot a Fake News Article - EasyBib Blog

Election upsets, Zika, the Syrian crisis, and unfortunately tons of fake news about all of the above and everything in between. Denzel Washington was recently quoted as saying, “If you don’t read the newspaper, you’re uninformed. If you do read the newspaper, you’re misinformed.” So what should you do? You want to be informed, but a good deal of the information out there is incorrect or biased. 1. Links and citations allow us to easily access, read, and explore more about the information found in the article.

Executive Summary 11.21.16. Balanced news, issues and opinions, media bias ratings, political news. 4 Sites to Fight Fake News. Common Sense Education has released a 1-minute video featuring four websites to separate fact from fiction.

4 Sites to Fight Fake News

When the next viral story, makes it to class, take break to discuss media literacy and help your students determine how these sites can be of value. This site is all about following the money. It points out the connections among political contributions, lobbying data, and government policy. The site is run by a nonpartisan, independent, nonprofit, called the Center for Responsive Politics which is the nation's premier research group tracking money in U.S. politics and its effect on elections and public policy. The site was created so that citizens are empowered by access to clear and unbiased information about money’s role in politics and policy, and so they can use that knowledge to strengthen democracy. Here are some of the topics you will find on the site.

Sample opportunities are: Innovative Educators: This is a great resource for any writing or journalism class. 1000+ images about News Literacy on Pinterest. 3 Fast, Free Lesson Plans to Fight Fake News. The fake news epidemic is disturbing.

3 Fast, Free Lesson Plans to Fight Fake News

How do we fight it? Well, we can take a hint from how the medical community fights the flu or any other virus. We inoculate ourselves. Fake Hurricane Sandy Photos Spread On Internet As Storm Barrels Toward Northeast. On Facebook, the stirring picture has more than 70,000 likes and 90,000 shares, and the viral image was picked up by NPR, The Washington Post, The Daily Beast, Talking Points Memo and others according to Poynter.

Fake Hurricane Sandy Photos Spread On Internet As Storm Barrels Toward Northeast

The only problem? It’s not a picture from Hurricane Sandy. The picture, taken by photographer Karin Markert, is actually from September. In a comment posted by Poynter, Markert elaborates on the image’s (inaccurate) claim to fame. “I was using it as my Facebook cover photo, which apparently is ‘public,’ and what do you know? As the hurricane originally dubbed “Frankenstorm” dumps water throughout the Northeast, the Internet has been similarly flooded with “amazing” pictures of the storm that are truly too good to be true. This photo has also been retweeted thousands of times: Unfortunately, the picture is not from Hurricane Sandy, but rather from a tornado warning last year.

It’s not uncommon for tweet-happy social media addicts to post pictures with little fact checking. Identifying Fake News: An Infographic and Educator Resources - EasyBib Blog. We recently posted, “10 Ways to Spot a Fake News Article,” which highlighted key items to look for on a website when determining its credibility.

Identifying Fake News: An Infographic and Educator Resources - EasyBib Blog

The infographic found here summarizes the content from the blog post and students can use it as a guide when using news sources in research. Post, print, or share it with your students or others! Looking for other resources related to website credibility? We’ve listed some of our favorites below the infographic! Don't Click Here: Facebook, Algorithms, and Articles You Won’t Be Shown. Fake news, bias, or satirical comedy what's the difference. Fake News and K-12 Information Literacy: Following the November 2016 Presidential election, there was great concern about fake news on Facebook and in Google searches.

Fake news, bias, or satirical comedy what's the difference

And then, in what seemed to be perfect timing, a Stanford group released the study “Evaluating Information: The Cornerstone of Civic Online Reasoning” on November 22, 2016. The report conducted by Stanford History Education Group was an 18-month study that started well before the recent concerns about all of the online fake news. The results of the study show that students all the way to college age are not recognizing the basics of evaluating a source.