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AI, Big Data and Privacy

Big Tech Suppresses Information About the Health Damage It Inflicts on Kids. We believe that modern technology platforms, such as Google, Facebook, Amazon and Apple, are even more powerful than most people realize – Eric Schmidt, Google, 2014 There is a preponderance of evidence that social media and smartphone usage seriously damage the mental health of adolescents.

Big Tech Suppresses Information About the Health Damage It Inflicts on Kids

Suicide rates among adolescents and young women have skyrocketed from 2007 to 2017.Smartphones and social media consumption by adolescents are intertwined. Almost all the social media platforms and smartphones are supplied by the following five Big Tech companies: Google, Facebook, Twitter, Microsoft, and Apple. These five companies have a total market cap of $3.5 Trillion.

How are households actually using internet connectivity, and why does it matter? More than a hundred million US households have fixed-line broadband access, generating tens of billions of dollars in yearly access charges, but there is surprisingly little reliable knowledge about online user behavior.

How are households actually using internet connectivity, and why does it matter?

Nonetheless, copious amounts of attention — not to mention subsidies and other government resources — are applied to universal service policies and other regulatory and judicial activities (such as merger and antitrust evaluations) that must hinge on a detailed understanding of how consumers respond to various internet service providers’ offers. Effective decisions require policymakers to have a detailed knowledge of how consumers allocate their attention across a panoply of internet applications and content. How consumers allocate their attention among internet sites may seem to have much in common with other standard consumer choice settings: Internet user attention is a scarce resource, and users must make choices about where to spend their limited time. To discuss concerns about privacy and data sharing, we must understand how Big Tech uses APIs.

When considering how to manage data sharing and privacy concerns, it helps to have a baseline understanding of how the technologies that policy will influence actually work.

To discuss concerns about privacy and data sharing, we must understand how Big Tech uses APIs

How do companies such as Google, Facebook, and Amazon use the data they gather on their users? Application programming interfaces (APIs) are one type of technology used by the tech giants that compile user data to be analyzed and shared with third parties. An API allows applications or computers to communicate with one another through a coded interface.

They are designed to interconnect two or more online services to exchange relative data points. Along with reducing friction for users, APIs allow additional access to data about each customer that conducts transactions across different platforms. Through APIs, platform companies gain more data about visitors to each other’s websites or apps. Huawei makes false promises on 5G security as one of the ‘Five Eyes’ goes blind. China has been a major funder of infrastructure in Asia and Africa in recent years through its Belt and Road Initiative, a global effort by Beijing to create geopolitical allies through investment in traditional physical infrastructure.

Huawei makes false promises on 5G security as one of the ‘Five Eyes’ goes blind

But over the past decade, the initiative has found itself shape-shifting into a digital strategy in Europe, thanks in large part to work by Huawei, the Chinese telecoms giant. A Huawei logo is pictured at the Shanghai auto show in China April 16, 2019 – via REUTERS Last week, news leaked that Britain’s National Security Council had voted to allow Huawei “to supply some ‘non-core’ technology [for the UK’s 5G wireless network] . . . but several ministers in the meeting on Tuesday raised concerns even about that concession, arguing instead for a total ban on the supplier.”

Huawei is using its ability to provide cheaper (subsidized) telecommunications equipment to integrate itself into the UK and European countries. Center for Humane Technology. How a Technology Addiction Can Hurt Your Health. Dopamine, How to Improve Your Motivation, Happiness, and Digestion. Have Smartphones Destroyed a Generation? One day last summer, around noon, I called Athena, a 13-year-old who lives in Houston, Texas. Nomophobia — 5 Steps to Ending Your Smartphone Addiction. Does the “ding” of your phone have you dropping whatever you’re doing to see who “liked” your latest Facebook status?

Nomophobia — 5 Steps to Ending Your Smartphone Addiction

Are you answering work emails before rubbing the sleep from your eyes? Does a low battery icon leave you quivering in fear? First of Its Kind University Study Proves Without a Doubt that Your Phone is Spying On You. Chinese surveillance awaits Americans if China wins race for mobile tech. The arrest of Meng Wanzhou, chief financial officer of Huawei, sent shockwaves through policy circles in Washington, D.C., as well as in government and corporate actors in China.

Chinese surveillance awaits Americans if China wins race for mobile tech

There has been much handwringing over what President Trump knew about the arrest — which came on the same day as his meeting with Chinese leader Xi Jinping on the sidelines of the G20 — and when he knew it, but that narrow focus ignores the bigger picture here. Meng’s arrest confirms what many already suspected: Huawei presents a multifaceted threat to U.S. interests, both at home and abroad.

A man holds a Chinese flag outside the B.C. Why the Cost of Living Is Poised to Plummet in the Next 20 Years. People are concerned about how AI and robotics are taking jobs, destroying livelihoods, reducing our earning capacity, and subsequently destroying the economy.

Why the Cost of Living Is Poised to Plummet in the Next 20 Years

In anticipation, countries like Canada, India and Finland are running experiments to pilot the idea of "universal basic income" — the unconditional provision of a regular sum of money from the government to support livelihood independent of employment. Kicking Google out of my life: Day 1. Have you ever had one of those moments where you feel like one company has far too much control over your computing life?

Kicking Google out of my life: Day 1

I know. Kicking Google out of my life, Part 2: Leaving Android is not so easy. Two days ago, I declared to the world that I would be kicking Google out of my life.

Kicking Google out of my life, Part 2: Leaving Android is not so easy

It's not because I think Google is some evil corporation, hell bent on the destruction of all that is good and just in this world. And it certainly is not because the stuff they make stinks (it really doesn't). Kicking Google out of my life: A surprise Android replacement emerges. I have 25 days left in my 30-day quest to remove my dependency on Google services (read part 1 for the full details on why I'm doing this and how I'm approaching my, perhaps foolhardy, endeavor).

Kicking Google out of my life: A surprise Android replacement emerges

The first step for me was an easy one – I simply needed to take my ChromeOS-powered laptop and install a different operating system on it. Fast and easy. Took me roughly an hour to complete that goal. With ChromeOS removed from my daily life, my attentions turned to Android. Which, for me, became a far more challenging task.

If I proclaimed that I was using Windows or iOS for my primary mobile devices… the Internet would never let me hear the end of it. Kicking Google out of my life, Part 4: Goodbye, Gmail. Super-Fast Recap 2000™: I am currently giving myself 30 days to remove all Google products and services from my life because I have simply become too dependent upon on them.