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Introduction to Indigenous Australia - Australian Museum. Australia has always had a mix of cultures and people although not in the same way as it does today.

Introduction to Indigenous Australia - Australian Museum

Cross boomerang E013838 Photographer: Australian Museum Photography Unit © Australian Museum Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures have changed and developed over time. Australia's first people, Australia before the British arrived, British colonisation of Australia, SOSE Year 4, NSW. Early Australia Australia has not always looked like it does today.

Australia's first people, Australia before the British arrived, British colonisation of Australia, SOSE Year 4, NSW

Before 1788 the only people living in Australia were Aboriginal people and Torres Strait Islander people. There were no buildings and no roads like there are today. The environment was also very different. Aboriginal people had a great respect for the land and took great care of it. Indigenous Weather Knowledge - Sub divisions within the key climate groups. Desert Knowledge for Kids - Alice Springs Desert Park.

D'harawal calendar - Indigenous Weather Knowledge - Bureau of Meteorology. D'harawal calendar D'harawal The D'harawal Country and language area extends from the southern shores of Port Jackson (Sydney Harbour) to the northern shores of the Shoalhaven River, and from the eastern shores of the Wollondilly River system to the eastern seaboard.

D'harawal calendar - Indigenous Weather Knowledge - Bureau of Meteorology

Permission to use the D'harawal seasonal calendar is granted by the D'harawal Traditional Knowledgeholders' and Descendents' Circle. A Brief Aboriginal History. “The very ink with which all history is written is merely fluid prejudice.”

A Brief Aboriginal History

Mark Twain Since the European invasion of Australia in 1788, the Aboriginal people have been oppressed into a world unnatural to their existence for thousands of years.  Australians Together. More than soil, rocks or minerals For many Indigenous people in Australia, land is much more than soil, rocks or minerals.

 Australians Together

It’s a living environment that sustains and is sustained by people and culture. Why a connection to country is so important to Aboriginal communities. Trying to frame this concept in modern language, is like trying to grasp a two dimensional cup out of a piece of paper, it's the layers that make the cup palpable, not the drawing of it.

Why a connection to country is so important to Aboriginal communities

Connection to country is inherent, we are born to it, it is how we identify ourselves, it is our family, our laws, our responsibility, our inheritance and our legacy. To not know your country causes a painful disconnection, the impact of which is well documented in studies relating to health, wellbeing and life outcomes. Modern constructs of identification do not work for us, in fact they dismantle the fabric that holds us together. For example, it matters not that my licence says that I live in Sydney, it matters that I am guest in this place, I respect it because I am from the Arrente and Luritja lands, and it is this knowledge that enables me to identify who I am, who my family is, who my ancestors were and what my stories are. Meaning of land to Aboriginal people - Creative Spirits. What does land mean to Aboriginal people?

Meaning of land to Aboriginal people - Creative Spirits

Non-Indigenous people and land owners might consider land as something they own, a commodity to be bought and sold, an asset to make profit from, but also a means to make a living off it or simply ‘home’ [1]. For Aboriginal people the relationship is much deeper. The land owns Aboriginal people and every aspect of their lives is connected to it. They have a profound spiritual connection to land. Aboriginal law and spirituality are intertwined with the land, the people and creation, and this forms their culture and sovereignty.