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Creating Characters

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Medieval Names - List of Medieval Names. Baby Names at BabyNames.com. Baby Names - Baby Name Meanings - Names & Baby. Behind the Name: Meaning of Names, Baby Name Meanings. Baby Names Meanings, Baby Boy Names, Girl Names, Baby Names with Meaning. Character Qualities. A List of Character Traits. Character Archetypes.

Main/Genre Tropes. Character Flaw Index. To make characters realistic and relatable they are given flaws, because if there is anything a writer can be sure of it is that no one in their audience will be perfect.

Character Flaw Index

Flaws are character traits that have a negative impact in the narrative, unless they are simply informed. They can also be exploited. See Good Flaws, Bad Flaws for a scale of flaw acceptability. Compare Seven Deadly Sins, Ego Tropes. Physical Descriptions - List of Hair Colors. Hair Color List (Note: an updated and expanded version of this list appears in my 15K-word book How to Describe Hair and Skin.

Physical Descriptions - List of Hair Colors

See below.) [First, my profound apologies to the vast majority of readers who don't steal content, but I have to state the following. This article and all content on this website belongs to Val Kovalin, copyright © Obsidianbookshelf.com, except where noted. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without written permission from Val Kovalin is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Val Kovalin and Obsidianbookshelf.com with a return link to the original content.] I'll admit it – hair colors are fun, even for someone like me who advocates keeping description to a minimum. Natural human hair color comes in these basic shades: blond(e), red, light brown, dark brown, black, gray, white. Words to Describe Skin Color. Describing characters of color in writing. 200 Word Descriptive Hair List. 100 Character Development Questions for Writers.

Character Questionnaires - Get to Know Your Characters. Receive more writing tips and advice (along with special offers and other Gotham news).

Character Questionnaires - Get to Know Your Characters

One of the best ways to get to know your characters is to ask questions about them. Many writers do this as a kind of homework before they actually start writing a story. The more you know your characters, the fuller they will be. This might also make your story easier to write. The following questionnaires may be downloaded so you can work with the actual documents. Creating Stunning Character Arcs, Pt. 1: Can You Structure Characters?

What if there were a sure-fire secret to creating stunning character arcs?

Creating Stunning Character Arcs, Pt. 1: Can You Structure Characters?

Would you be interested in discovering it? If you care about connecting with readers, grabbing hold of their emotions, and creating stories that will resonate with them on a level deeper than mere entertainment, then the answer has to be a resounding yes! But here’s the thing about character arcs: they’re way too easy to take for granted. On the surface, character arcs seem to boil down to nothing more than a simple three-step process: 1. 2. 3. That’s character arc in a nutshell. Turns out: a lot. (Featured in the Structuring Your Novel Workbook.) 25 Things You Should Know About Character. Previous iterations of the “25 Things” series: 25 Things Every Writer Should Know 25 Things You Should Know About Storytelling And now… Here you’ll find the many things I believe — at this moment!

25 Things You Should Know About Character

— about characters: 1. Without character, you have nothing. 2. A great character can be the line between narrative life and story death. 3. Don’t believe that all those other aspects are separate from the character. 4. 5 Tips on How to Write From the Opposite Gender. 6 Ways to Make Sure Your Reader’s Brain Syncs with Your Protagonist’s Brain. Photo by Andres Musta via Flickr Because here’s the thing: it’s not fiction.

6 Ways to Make Sure Your Reader’s Brain Syncs with Your Protagonist’s Brain

It’s fact. Except, you know, for the Vulcan part. And, okay, the part where you have to put your fingertips on the other guy’s face to do it. But hey, the world was pretty much analog back then, so who could blame Wincelberg for seeing life as hands-on, and thus missing the nuances of how information is actually transferred from one brain to another? 10 Secrets to Creating Unforgettable Supporting Characters. The Inner Struggle: Guides for Using Inner Conflict That Make Sense. By Janice Hardy, @Janice_Hardy I sat in on an amazing workshop while I was at RWA that made something typically vague very clear and applicable.

The Inner Struggle: Guides for Using Inner Conflict That Make Sense

Michael Hague's Using Inner Conflict to Create Powerful Love Stories. It was one of those workshops that discussed what I already knew, but Hague presented it in such a way that I clearly saw a super easy way to apply inner journeys to my stories. While the workshop was about romance specifically, the pieces of Hague’s inner conflict really work for any character journey. He calls the overall arc the “journey from living in fear to living courageously.” Let's take a peek at Hauge's basic inner conflict arc: Longing or Need: The thing the character longs for or needs in the story. If this doesn’t say “inner goal” I don’t know what does. (More on goals here) Wound: A past wound or hurt that is a current unhealed source of pain. The wound might be some deep dark secret, or it can be how the character grew up. Character and Characterisation in the Novel.

How to write convincing characters Characterisation - the task of building characters - isn't easy.

Character and Characterisation in the Novel

But if you're struggling to build characters with real life and vigour, just follow these rules. If you do follow them correctly, we can pretty much guarantee that your characterisation will be just fine! Know what kind of character you are writing There are roughly two types of protagonist in fiction. The second type of character (rather less common, in fact) is the genuinely extraordinary character who would make things happen in an empty room. 6 Ways to Write Better Bad Guys.