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Google Search Operators - Search Help

You can use symbols or words in your search to make your search results more precise. Google Search usually ignores punctuation that isn’t part of a search operator. Don’t put spaces between the symbol or word and your search term. A search for site:nytimes.com will work, but site: nytimes.com won’t. Search social media Put @ in front of a word to search social media. Search for a price Put $ in front of a number. Search hashtags Put # in front of a word. Exclude words from your search Put - in front of a word you want to leave out. Search for an exact match Put a word or phrase inside quotes. Search for wildcards or unknown words Put a * in your word or phrase where you want to leave a placeholder. Search within a range of numbers Put .. between two numbers. Combine searches Put "OR" between each search query. Search a specific site Put "site:" in front of a site or domain. Search for related sites Put "related:" in front of a web address you already know. Get details about a site Share this:

https://support.google.com/websearch/answer/2466433?hl=en

Related:  doxingGoogle searchinfo-docmissmudesearch strategies, bookmarking

Google Guide Quick Reference: Google Advanced Operators (Cheat Sheet) The following table lists the search operators that work with each Google search service. Click on an operator to jump to its description — or, to read about all of the operators, simply scroll down and read all of this page. The following is an alphabetical list of the search operators. This list includes operators that are not officially supported by Google and not listed in Google’s online help. Each entry typically includes the syntax, the capabilities, and an example. Unsafe Search While Google and Yahoo allow you to filter pornography and explicit sexual content from your search results using their "SafeSearch" feature, they do not provide a means to search exclusively for such adult material. It's a shame when someone searching for pornographic material related to, say, llamas, is forced to slog though many pages of perfectly innocuous llama sites before finally hitting upon the llama porn he was looking for. And very few people who do a Google search for "nice tits" want to find a site like this one.

67-open-source-replacements-for-really-expensive-applications-3 38.Inkscape Replaces Illustrator ($599), CorelDraw($399) Another tool for graphics professionals, Inkscape is a vector graphics drawing program with many advanced features. The Inkscape website also includes links to a library of open source clip art that you can use freely in your illustrations. Operating System: Windows, Linux, OS X 39. Paint.Net Replaces Photoshop CS5 ($699) This Photoshop alternative has been described by reviewers as "impressive" and "just about perfect." Ten Search Tools and Tactics Teachers and Students Need to Know I often find myself in conversations with teachers and students about Internet search strategies. Often times the conversation reminds me that what's obvious to me is amazing to someone else. Last week I had that very experience as I taught a couple of teachers some search techniques that they are going to pass along to their students. As a follow-up to that experience, I've crafted the following list of search tools and tactics that every teacher and student should know. 1.

Less Popular Google Search Tips There’s not a day that passes by without searching for information on Google. We’re pretty sure that you’re aware of some advanced Google search operators like AND, NOT, etc. but here are some lesser known tricks that you can implement when you’re searching on Google. We bet you wouldn’t know at least one of these! 1. Google Ultimate Interface About Google In 1996-1997, Larry Page and Sergey Brin came up with an algorithm to rank web pages, called PageRank. Realizing the potential to improve search engines, they tried and failed to sell the technology to any. Teacher Recommended: 50 Favorite Classroom Apps Educators and students are quickly becoming more comfortable with classroom technology, allowing them to shift from thinking about the technical side of integrating a new tool to focusing on how it improves learning. While the sheer number of education apps is still overwhelming, increasingly teachers have found what works for them and are sticking to them. “The conversations I had were radically different than they were a year ago,” said Michelle Luhtala, the librarian for New Canaan High School and host of an Emerging Tech webinar on edWeb. She tapped her professional learning network of educators, teaching all grades and located all over the country, to share their favorite tech tools. “A year ago people felt like it was this new thing that was so overwhelming,” Luhtala said, “and now it really seems much more comfortable.” Educators have become proficient with their favorite classroom apps and are getting more creative with using them to achieve teaching goals.

Google Docs Why Google Docs? Google Apps is a tremendous platform for facilitating online collaboration in your classroom, or beyond. It is freely available on the Web and if you are familiar with other word processors, spreadsheets, and presentation programs, you can easily use Google Docs. The chat feature on presentations makes it possible to create a "permeable classroom" by bringing experts into a lesson to interact with students online. How-To Find Files In Unprotected Directories We’ve all got a little voyeurism in us. That’s a big reason why the post, Clearing Google Search History to Maintain Your Privacy sent my visitor counts off the charts :). In this article, I’m going to show you how to create search queries that will list the contents of unprotected directories on the internet.

Musings about librarianship: 6 common misconceptions when doing advanced Google Searching As librarians we are often called upon to teach not just library databases but also Google and Google Scholar. Unlike teaching other search tools, teaching Google is often tricky because unlike library databases where we can have insider access through our friendly product support representative as librarians we have no more or no less insight into Google which is legendary for being secretive. Still, given that Google has become synonymous with search we should be decently good at teaching it. I've noticed though, often when people teach Google, particularly advanced searching of Google, they fall prey to 2 main types of errors.

How Google Dominates Us (book review, includes search theory) In the Plex: How Google Thinks, Works, and Shapes Our Lives by Steven Levy Simon and Schuster, 424 pp., $26.00

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