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Bloom's Digital Taxonomy

Bloom's Digital Taxonomy
This is the introduction to Bloom's Digital Taxonomy. The different taxonomical levels can be viewed individually via the navigation bar or below this introduction as embedded pages. This is an update to Bloom's Revised Taxonomy which attempts to account for the new behaviours and actions emerging as technology advances and becomes more ubiquitous. Bloom's Revised Taxonomy describes many traditional classroom practices, behaviours and actions, but does not account for the new processes and actions associated with Web 2.0 technologies, infowhelm (the exponential growth in information), increasing ubiquitous personal technologies or cloud computing.Bloom's Digital Taxonomy isn't about the tools or technologies rather it is about using these to facilitate learning. Outcomes on rubrics are measured by competence of use and most importantly the quality of the process or product. For example. Key Resources This infographic links Blooms Digital Taxonomy to the communication spectrum. Applying

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Flipping with HyperDocs: Part 2 – Flipped Learning Global Initiative In Part 1 of Flipping with HyperDocs, I gave a brief introduction – a teaser, if you will – of why I am so hyped up about HyperDocs. Recall that HyperDocs are more than just a Google Doc containing hyperlinks. HyperDocs can take students to higher levels of thinking, utilizing an inquiry approach to learning. If you are flipping your classroom, you will find it to be a complement to your group space-time.

Major Categories in the Taxonomy of Educational Objectives Knowledge remembering of previously learned material; of terminology; specific facts; ways and means of dealing with specifics (conventions, trends and sequences, classifications and categories, criteria, methodology); universals and abstractions in a field (principles and generalizations, theories and structures): Knowledge is (here) defined as the remembering (recalling) of appropriate, previously learned information. defines; describes; enumerates; identifies; labels; lists; matches; names; reads; records; reproduces; selects; states; views; writes;. Comprehension: Grasping (understanding) the meaning of informational materials. classifies; cites; converts; describes; discusses; estimates; explains; generalizes; gives examples; illustrates; makes sense out of; paraphrases; restates (in own words); summarizes; traces; understands. Application: The use of previously learned information in new and concrete situations to solve problems that have single or best answers.

Primary Source Sets Teachers Abraham Lincoln: Rise to National Prominence Speeches, correspondence, campaign materials and a map documenting the free and slave states in 1856 chronicle Lincoln’s rise to national prominence Alexander Hamilton Manuscripts, images, and historic newspapers document the life and accomplishments of Alexander Hamilton American Authors in the Nineteenth Century: Whitman, Dickinson, Longfellow, Stowe, and Poe A selection of Library of Congress primary sources exploring the topic of American authors in the nineteenth century, including Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and Edgar Allan Poe. Top

The Differentiator Try Respondo! → ← Back to Byrdseed.com The Differentiator Every Presentation Ever: Communication Fail In case you haven’t seen it: Funny video on the inner thoughts of every presenter and what the audience really thinks. I particularly like the snide remark about how Macs are better than PC’s. If you liked that. You will like this. Definitions of Bloom's Taxonomy Activities at Various Cognitive Levels of Learning (LoL) Bloom’s taxonomy of learning objectives is used to define how well a skill or competency is learned or mastered. A fuller description of Bloom’s taxonomy is given in the following pages but a brief summary of the activities associated with each level is given below. At Knowledge Level of Learning a student can define terms At Comprehension Level of Learning a student can work assigned problems and can example what they did At Application Level of Learning a student recognizes what methods to used and then used the methods to solve problems At Analysis Level of Learning a student can explain why the solution process works At Synthesis Level of Learning a student can combine the part of a process in new and useful ways At Evaluation Level of Learning a student can create a variety of ways to solve the problem and then, based on established criteria, select the solution method best suited for the problem. What do I do at this level?

Do College Students Read? - With college back in session, we can welcome the bemoaning of college students nationwide on social media – students now encumbered with their: back-to-back-to-back class schedules, unending assignments and group projects, non-stop social lives, and their numerous, heavily marked-up textbook collection. It’s surely busy here, but we wanted to take a moment to see if students were putting down their textbooks for just a second, and picking up a book for pleasure. So we went to our panel of students to ask: “do you read for fun?” Here are some of the results: Frequency: Search Results » blooms This post is in response to a Newsweek article titled “What if You Could Learn Everything” “Imagine every student has a tireless personal tutor, an artificially intelligent and inexhaustible companion that magically knows everything, knows the student, and helps her learn what she needs to know.” Jose Ferreira, the CEO of Knewton, has made this artificially intelligent companion a reality for k-12 students.

Should Teachers Friend Their Students? On Facebook, how classroom rules do and do not apply. In real life, people don't just usually walk right up to you and ask you to be their friend. Little kids do, I guess, but adults generally see that sort of question as just plain weird. I think of this sometimes when my students friend me on Facebook—adding yet another layer of complexity to the question of how best to balance the teacher-student-friend relationship—a layer of complexity that just five years ago did not exist. Bloom's Taxonomy of Learning Domains Bloom's Taxonomy was created in 1956 under the leadership of educational psychologist Dr Benjamin Bloom in order to promote higher forms of thinking in education, such as analyzing and evaluating concepts, processes, procedures, and principles, rather than just remembering facts (rote learning). It is most often used when designing educational, training, and learning processes. The Three Domains of Learning

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