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Translate emotions into written body language We are always told to use body language in our writing. Sometimes, it's easier said than written. I decided to create these cheat sheets to help you show a character's state of mind. Obviously, a character may exhibit a number of these behaviours. For example, he may be shocked and angry, or shocked and happy. The Top Five Tips For Using Body Language Use body language to add depth to dialogue. If you want to learn how to write a book, join our Writers Write course in Johannesburg. Even if you're not busy with a book, prompts are an excellent way to exercise the writing muscle. If you enjoyed this post, read:

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25 Ways To Fuck With Your Characters As storyteller, you are god. And to be frank, you’re not a particularly nice god — at least, not if you want your story to resonate with readers. A good storyteller is a crass and callous deity who treats the characters under his watchful eye like a series of troubled butt-puppets. From this essential conflict — storyteller versus character — a story is born. How to Write a Flat Character Arc, Pt. 1: The First Act Next to the positive change arc, the flat character arc is the most popular storyline. Also called the “testing arc,” the flat arc is about a character who does not change. He already has the Truth figured out in the beginning of the story, and he uses that Truth to help him overcome various external tests. The flat-arc protagonist will be confronted with tremendous opposition. He will at times be shaken. His commitment to the Truth will be tested to the breaking point—but he will never waver from it.

Top 10 Blogs for Writers 2015 We’re delighted to announce the winners of our 9th annual Top 10 Blogs for Writers Competition! It’s exciting to see such an array of excellent blogs for writers. Make sure you visit all the ten blogs to get to know the new top crop of writing blogs. Daily Word Count Output of My Favorite Writers - Algonquin Redux I’ve noticed a lot of writers posting their daily word output on social media. The single common denominator of these posts, unfortunately, has been word counts that exceed my own. In hope of feeling better, I compiled some data on the typical daily productivity of writers I admire. What follows is a selection that provides a representative sample. Bear in mind that no heed is given to the relative merits of such numbers, and, as Mark Twain said, “There are three kinds of lies: lies, damned lies and statistics.” Speaking of Twain, every morning he would get up and eat a hearty breakfast, then go to his study to write, staying there until about five, except in case of emergency—if anyone needed him, they had to sound a horn.

10,000-Year Calendar! Get out the nice paper for these photo calendars! Monthly and yearly calendars available! 100's of artworks and photos available! Unusual Words Unusual Words A by no means exhaustive list of rare, obscure, strange and sometimes funny words and their meanings that only seem to crop up in crosswords and dictionaries. Words that are used so seldom, you wonder who invented them and why. Home ~ The Stories ~ Diversions ~ Links ~ Contact The Adverb Is Not Your Friend: Stephen King on Simplicity of Style by Maria Popova “I believe the road to hell is paved with adverbs, and I will shout it from the rooftops.” “Employ a simple and straightforward style,” Mark Twain instructed in the 18th of his 18 famous literary admonitions. And what greater enemy of simplicity and straightforwardness than the adverb? Or so argues Stephen King in On Writing: A Memoir on the Craft (public library), one of 9 essential books to help you write better.

The Top 42 Writing Posts of 2014 Last year we posted The Top 42 Writing Posts of 2013. We want to carry on this tradition every year. These were the posts you wanted to see on this website in 2014. We have also included the number of views each post received as at 31 December 2014. The articles are written by Amanda Patterson, Mia Botha and Anthony Ehlers. "Composing collaborative fiction with a hypermedia authoring tool: A q" by Brien James Dick Brien James Dick, Purdue University Abstract This study attempted to understand the dynamic processes of students using hypermedia for written composition from a sociocognitive perspective. The research was guided by three questions; (1) Do children limit the organization of hypermedia to a manageable level when they are aware of the possible ways to connect information? (2) What problems do children struggle to solve when composing in the writing space of hypermedia, and how do they solve these problems?

11 questions that only mean something in Ireland SERIOUSLY. IN ANY other country, you’d get some fierce blank looks. It’s a special kind of Irish nonsense. 1. 45 ways to avoid using the word 'very' Three Telling Quotes About ‘Very’ Substitute ‘damn’ every time you’re inclined to write ‘very;’ your editor will delete it and the writing will be just as it should be. ~Mark Twain‘Very’ is the most useless word in the English language and can always come out. More than useless, it is treacherous because it invariably weakens what it is intended to strengthen. ~Florence KingSo avoid using the word ‘very’ because it’s lazy.

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