background preloader

APA Formatting and Style Guide

APA Formatting and Style Guide
Summary: APA (American Psychological Association) style is most commonly used to cite sources within the social sciences. This resource, revised according to the 6th edition, second printing of the APA manual, offers examples for the general format of APA research papers, in-text citations, endnotes/footnotes, and the reference page. For more information, please consult the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, (6th ed., 2nd printing). Contributors: Joshua M. Paiz, Elizabeth Angeli, Jodi Wagner, Elena Lawrick, Kristen Moore, Michael Anderson, Lars Soderlund, Allen Brizee, Russell KeckLast Edited: 2018-02-21 02:26:13 Please use the example at the bottom of this page to cite the Purdue OWL in APA. To see a side-by-side comparison of the three most widely used citation styles, including a chart of all APA citation guidelines, see the Citation Style Chart. You can also watch our APA vidcast series on the Purdue OWL YouTube Channel. General APA Guidelines Title Page Abstract

https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/01/

Related:  Digital Researchinvestigación

www.creativebloq.com/design-tools/data-visualization-712402 It's often said that data is the new world currency, and the web is the exchange bureau through which it's traded. As consumers, we're positively swimming in data; it's everywhere from labels on food packaging design to World Health Organisation reports. As a result, for the designer it's becoming increasingly difficult to present data in a way that stands out from the mass of competing data streams. Get Adobe Creative Cloud One of the best ways to get your message across is to use a visualization to quickly draw attention to the key messages, and by presenting data visually it's also possible to uncover surprising patterns and observations that wouldn't be apparent from looking at stats alone. And nowadays, there's plenty of free graphic design software to help you do just that.

How to Cite an Online Associated Press Article The Associated Press is an international news association that writes and sells content to newspapers around the globe. Usually, when an article has originated from the Associated Press, it is simply credited to the organization instead of to a specific author. This means that associated press articles accessed online should list "Associated Press" as the author.

The Purdue OWL: Research and Citation If you are having trouble locating a specific resource please visit the search page or the Site Map. Conducting Research These OWL resources will help you conduct research using primary source methods, such as interviews and observations, and secondary source methods, such as books, journals, and the Internet. This area also includes materials on evaluating research sources. Using Research These OWL resources will help you use the research you have conducted in your documents. The 5 Cs in Education: What If… Sketchnoting in the Process After my sketchnoting workshop at Miami Device, I was asked to record my process of CREATING the sketchnotes. I used Airserver to mirror my iPad display to my laptopUsed Screenflow to record myself sketching the main points of the presentationUsed Screenflow to speed up the recorded footage from 30+ minutes to 2.5 minutesExported, then imported into iMovie to add credtits and music This was the first time doing a screencast this way for me…there are a few kinks that I still need to work out (how to NOT record the screenflow toolbar).

Creative Commons Resources for Classroom Teachers Posted by Bill Ferriter on Sunday, 09/08/2013 If your students are using images, video, or music in the final products that they are producing for your class, then it is INCREDIBLY important that you introduce them to the Creative Commons -- an organization that is helping to redefine copyright laws. With a self-described goal to "save the world from failed sharing," the Creative Commons organization has developed a set of licenses that content creators can use when sharing the work. Census Data, Tax Forms and Other Government Documents - APA Style: Citing Your Sources - Research Guides at University of Southern California Government Reports When citing government documents, provide as much information as you can. The citation largely follows the format for books where the author is the government office or department. Example: National Institute of Mental Health. (1990).

MLA Formatting and Style Guide Coming Soon: A new look for our same great content! We're working hard this summer on a redesign of the Purdue OWL. Worry not! Our navigation menu and content will remain largely the same. Summary: Help Them Brainstorm! 50+ Tips & Resources Posted by Shelly Terrell on Friday, December 20th 2013 Included in the Digital Tips Advent Calendar and part of the Effective Technology Integration category “An idea, like a ghost, must be spoken to a little before it will explain itself.” – Charles Dickens Brainstorming is an important process that students should do frequently so it becomes a ritual they continue throughout their lives. Students need to get into the habit of spending time with their thoughts, fleshing them out, and discovering the best way way to feed their inspiration.

Search Search tips: Search terms are case-insensitiveCommon words are ignoredBy default only articles containing all terms in the query are returned (i.e., AND is implied)Combine multiple words with OR to find articles containing either term; e.g., education OR researchUse parentheses to create more complex queries; e.g., archive ((journal OR conference) NOT theses)Search for an exact phrase by putting it in quotes; e.g., "open access publishing"Exclude a word by prefixing it with - or NOT; e.g. online -politics or online NOT politicsUse * in a term as a wildcard to match any sequence of characters; e.g., soci* morality would match documents containing "sociological" or "societal" ISSN 2334-9182 (Print) ISSN 2334-9212 (Online) Publisher: University of Niš

Creative Comic Interview with Bill Zimmerman of MakeBeliefsComix 19 Flares Twitter 15 Facebook 0 Google+ 3 LinkedIn 1 inShare1 19 Flares × It was a great pleasure to interview Bill Zimmerman for last week’s webinar on Creative Comic Collaboration For Fun Fluency development. Bill is the mind, heart and soul behind MakeBeliefsComix.com I’ve been exploring comics websites and creating all kinds of different comic lesson plans for the last few years. This year I’m going into comic-style educational publishing. How Do I Cite a Kindle? by Chelsea Lee E-book readers, like the popular Kindle from Amazon.com, are revolutionizing the way we interact with the printed page. Although most e-book content has leaned toward the nonscholarly, major textbook manufacturers are now partnering with Amazon to produce e-textbooks, with a pilot program to be run at six universities in Fall 2009. They have recently debuted the Kindle DX ($489 retail), which in comparison to the original Kindle boasts a bigger screen (9.7” vs. 6” diagonally) and native support for PDFs, both key to good textbook reproduction. For the students and scholars who use Kindles (or other e-book readers) when writing papers, the next question becomes, how do I cite material I read on a Kindle? For the reference list entry, you’ll need to include the type of e-book version you read (two examples are the Kindle DX version and the Adobe Digital Editions version).

Magazine or newspaper article with no author, website - APA Style, 6th Edition - LibGuides at Bow Valley College There are two options for citing this source in-text: 1) A shortened version of the title (2 - 3 words) or the full title if it is short, date of publication, and page number(s) are placed in brackets at the end of the sentence. Write the shortened title in mixed case and in quotations marks. If there are no page numbers, refer to the paragraph number or heading within the text: ("How Globe and Mail," 2016, para. 1). 2) Alternatively, the citation may be integrated into the sentence with a signal phrase and narrative:

Research on the Go with Mobile Devices Posted by Shelly Terrell on Friday, November 8th 2013 From the Cool Sites Series and Mobile Learning Series “Be regular and orderly in your life, so that you may be violent and original in your work.” – Gustave Flaubert This week I am in beautiful Atlanta, Georgia, presenting at the GAETC conference. Webonauts Internet Academy . Parents and Teachers Webonauts Internet Academy is a web original game for PBS KIDS GO! that gives kids 8- to 10-year-old an opportunity to have some fun while exploring what it means to be a citizen in a web-infused‚ information-rich world. It is an engaging experience on its own but becomes all the more powerful when parents and teachers use game play as a springboard for conversations about media literacy and citizenship in the 21st Century.

Related:  Citations!APA Style References