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1 - Introduction: writing, literacy, and the origins of Japanese literature Cambridge Histories Online Numerous problems of definition and scope confront any survey of the beginnings of Japanese literature. We obviously have no direct access to the stories and songs that circulated before the advent of writing. Some features of this preliterate world can be extrapolated from later sources, but this is difficult to do with any confidence because the writers of many early texts deliberately engineer an impression of orality. In poetry – both vernacular (uta) and Chinese-style (shi) – it is also difficult to separate the mid to late eighth-century anthologies (the Kaifūsō and the Man'yōshū) from the historical milieux in which the poetry they collect was first composed and appreciated. Scholars are interested in the unfolding of particular genres, motifs, and techniques, but these anthologies themselves were shaped to present their own selective and tendentious versions of such literary histories.

Writing in Psychology: Experimental Report Writing Summary: Written for undergraduate students and new graduate students in psychology (experimental), this handout provides information on writing in psychology and on experimental report and experimental article writing. Contributors:Dana Lynn Driscoll, Aleksandra KasztalskaLast Edited: 2013-03-12 08:39:20 Google Scholar Citations Citation metrics are often used to gauge the influence of scholarly articles and authors. Some of you already track your citation metrics by regularly looking up your articles in Google Scholar. Many of you have asked us for an easier way to do this. Today we’re introducing Google Scholar Citations: a simple way for you to compute your citation metrics and track them over time.

Author Rights: Using the SPARC Author Addendum to secure your rights as the author of a journal article The text below is also available in PDF format, and the image is available as a poster. Click here to download the Addendum now. Your article has been accepted for publication in a journal and, like your colleagues, you want it to have the widest possible distribution and impact in the scholarly community. In the past, this required print publication. Today you have other options, like online archiving, but the publication agreement you’ll likely encounter will actually prevent broad distribution of your work. You would never knowingly keep your research from a readership that could benefit from it, but signing a restrictive publication agreement limits your scholarly universe and lessens your impact as an author.

Introduction: The Aesthetics of Japanese Fascism - California Scholarship Introduction: The Aesthetics of Japanese Fascism DOI:10.1525/california/9780520245051.003.0001 This introductory chapter first sets out the purpose of the book, which is to explore the aesthetics of fascism in 1930s Japan. APA Formatting and Style Guide Summary: APA (American Psychological Association) style is most commonly used to cite sources within the social sciences. This resource, revised according to the 6th edition, second printing of the APA manual, offers examples for the general format of APA research papers, in-text citations, endnotes/footnotes, and the reference page.

Academic publishers make Murdoch look like a socialist Who are the most ruthless capitalists in the western world? Whose monopolistic practices make Walmart look like a corner shop and Rupert Murdoch a socialist? You won't guess the answer in a month of Sundays. Copyright Toolbox There are nearly as many publishing agreements as there are publishers. Practically every publisher has its own agreement containing the terms and conditions under which it wishes to publish an article. For an author it is sometimes difficult to distill from the agreement the provisions which provide the author the opportunity to have optimal access to the journal article. If the author wants to be sure that he/she retains all the rights needed for optimal access the author could use this Licence to publish.

Introduction: The Aesthetics of Japanese Fascism - California Scholarship Introduction: The Aesthetics of Japanese Fascism DOI:10.1525/california/9780520245051.003.0001 This introductory chapter first sets out the purpose of the book, which is to explore the aesthetics of fascism in 1930s Japan. The works examined in this study—the writings of the Romantic essayist Yasuda Yojūrō, of the novelists Kawabata Yasunari and Shiga Naoya, of the folk-craft theorist Yanagi Sōetsu; of the culture critic Kobayashi Hideo, and of the postwar novelist Nakagami Kenji; a propaganda tract written by a governmental committee; a popular movie; and the singing of the postwar chanteuse Misora Hibari—supplied the permeating stream of ideology needed to promote goals more overtly elaborated in the political realm. The chapter then discusses the nature of Japanese fascism and so-called fascist moments, which grew out of cultural work and seduced readers away from intellectual analysis into submission to a mystique of national and racial destiny.

Navigating Copyright for Reproduced Images: Part 4. Writing the Copyright Statement by Chelsea Lee This post is part of a series on how to cite an image reproduced from another source in APA Style. Here are Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3. The fourth and final step of navigating copyright for reproduced images is writing the copyright statement. Why Handwriting Must Die Associate professor Anne Trubek argues that handwriting will soon be history, because writing words by hand is a technology that’s just too slow for our times, and our minds. A copy-paste summary from her essay: “Handwriting has been around for just 6,000 of humanity’s some 200,000 years. Its effects have been enormous, of course: It alters the brain, changes with civilizations, cultures and factions, and plays a role in religious and political battles.” “Most of us know, but often forget, that handwriting is not natural.

Navigating Copyright for Reproduced Images: Overview by Chelsea Lee This post is the overview for a series on how to cite an image reproduced from another source in APA Style. Many writers wonder how to cite an image they have reproduced from another source in an APA Style paper. The image might be a chart, graph, picture, clip art, photograph, infographic, figure, or table, and it might come from a journal article, magazine article, newspaper article, book, book chapter, report, or website. You may be surprised to learn that regardless of the type of image or its source, to reproduce an image in an APA Style paper is not as simple as copy and paste. There are legal implications of reproducing copyrighted intellectual property like images, even in student papers, and the upcoming series of posts will walk you through the process of understanding copyright and permissions and then appropriately crediting the source in your paper.

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