background preloader

10 Things Your Students Should Know About Their Digital Footprints

10 Things Your Students Should Know About Their Digital Footprints
Building a digital legacy is an issue I believe doesn’t garner enough attention in our personal and professional lives. In fact, some of the heaviest users of online tools and social media, are our young students, who are growing up as a generation of visual learners and visual attention seekers. This is in fact the Facebook and YouTube generation, and the reality is that many teens are unconcerned about the dangers of sharing personal information online. A highly respected education advocate, Kevin Honeycutt, once asked me if any of us from our generation (GenX and before), had ever made a mistake in puberty. He then asked if our mistakes are “Googleable.” The reality is that our mistakes from puberty are not “Googleable”. With that in mind, I have developed some important facts and opinions that our students should be completely aware of as they live in their digital world, creating digital footprints along the way. Our best-practice teaching strategies for multiple-choice assessments.

http://www.teachhub.com/10-things-your-students-should-know-about-their-digital-footprints

Related:  Digital Citizenship2Digital FootprintSocial Media in Schools

Infographic: Citizenship in the digital age By now it’s become clear: For all its wonders, the digital age has also introduced its fair share of challenges. From social media and cyberbullying to cybercrime, internet addiction and online privacy concerns, today’s students face a wide range of difficult issues that previous generations never had to think about. As a result, teachers, school leaders and parents are called on to add a whole new idea to our curricula: digital citizenship. Social Networking Nightmares Cyberspeak No Evil By Mike Simpson Story suggested by Tami Zeitler (Student member 2009), Central Washington University Want to get fired from your first teaching job? Don’t read this article. Seriously.

9 Ways to Use Social Media in Your Classroom It’s overwhelming to think about packing up the summer, heading back to the classroom, and adding a new instructional strategy to your already overflowing toolbox. Yet, ostensibly, you are a fairly proficient computer user who dabbles in social media (you’re reading this blog, right?), so you are curious about how it might fold into your curriculum. I apply social media in my classroom to help students view it as something that can–and will–influence their academic and professional life, hence the value of its responsible and ethical use. Here are nine strategies–one for each month of school– for incorporating social media into your classroom in ways that can encourage critical thinking through analysis and engagement.

10 Interactive Lessons By Google On Digital Citizenship YouTube has a firm place in the current classroom. From Khan Academy’s videos to YouTube EDU and beyond, there’s a reason all these videos are finding a home in schools. In an effort to help keep the ball rolling, Google just launched a set of 10 interactive lessons designed to support teachers in educating students on digital citizenship. 12 Things Students Should Never Do on Social Media The last thing young people want is another set of rules. But these days, social media comes with great responsibility, whether you're just starting high school or finishing up college. The fact is, irresponsible social media conduct could potentially ruin your education and negatively impact your career, not to mention hurt others in the process. (And we're not just talking kids, either.) But most of those consequences are preventable, often with just a little foresight. We've pinpointed 12 social media mistakes that students should avoid at all costs, because after all, it's never as simple as "be responsible."

How to Use Social Media as a Learning Tool Social media is an ingrained part of today’s society. Our students are constantly on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, and likely many sites we’re not hip enough to know about, and by reading this blog, you’re interacting with social media at this very moment. If you want to bring the “real world” into the classroom, consider integrating social media into your lessons. No Longer a Distraction Online Safety: A Teacher’s Guide to Dealing with Cyberbullying, Sexting, and Student Privacy Social media and text messages have blurred the lines between students’ school lives and private lives. While most schools take clear steps to protect students at school, more schools are beginning to consider the need to set policies that apply to students’ activities outside of school. When it comes to questionable online activities like cyberbullying and sexting, kids sometimes feel pressured to follow the crowd.

When Social Sharing Goes Wrong: Regretting The Facebook Post : All Tech Considered A model poses for photos next to a life-size makeshift Facebook browser in the Philippines. Ted Aljibe/AFP/Getty Images hide caption itoggle caption Ted Aljibe/AFP/Getty Images A model poses for photos next to a life-size makeshift Facebook browser in the Philippines. Ted Aljibe/AFP/Getty Images

Teachers, Take Care Of Your Digital Identity One of the areas of focus for me in my district this year is teaching teachers and students how to take control of their digital identity and turn it into something positive and something they can be proud of. Too often, students find themselves in situations that could be easily avoided if they understood what a positive digital footprint is and how to manage it. The same thing with teachers.

Teacher's Guide to Digital Citizenship The horror stories of young people not grasping the reach and influence of the content they put online are familiar to all of us. From the loss of job opportunities due to unprofessional pictures or comments on social media, to the more serious threats of abduction, and even the self-harm inspired by cyber bullying, the stakes are high. While students may often seem clueless to these dangers, some are starting to understand the risks. In a recent Rasmussen study on digital literacy, details of which you can see in the infographic below, 37% of millennials aged 18 – 34 said they consider the internet scary, which is more than any other demographic.

Endicott College - Observer Newspaper Kristina McNamara Staff Writer Over the past two years, over 20 students have had their admissions withdrawn as a result of inappropriate Facebook posts. The Office of Admissions is randomly checking the social media pages of incoming students to look for this unacceptable behavior. “We have denied more than several applications based upon what I would consider racial, sexual and inappropriate actions. I don’t want them here,” said Dr. Why Teachers Must Have a Digital Footprint Nov 27 2013 It’s so funny. Looking for other blog posts about how teachers need a digital footprint uncovers almost nothing. But, it’s true– It is no longer an option. Teachers must have a digital footprint. Why?

Related: