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Paris, ville antique

Paris, ville antique

http://www.paris.culture.fr/

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The Gauls of Acy-Romance: Discovering the Remi Article created on Thursday, March 8, 2012 Visitors to the village of Acy-Romance north of the modern day French city of Rheims, will see no sign of the Gallic village that was once there. However, very unusually, this village has been fully excavated. A succession of digs over fifteen years, plot by plot, has revealed the full details of the little Gallic settlement that stood here some 2200 years ago, in the heart of the territory of the Remi tribe. Aerial reconstruction of village. Image © Ministère de la culture et de la communication

52 Wild Plants You Can Eat - Updated In addition to using the list below as a resource, consider the importance of properly educating yourself before consuming wild plants. Below are some resources to consider: Stalking the Wild Asparagus and Stalking The Healthful Herbs by Euell Gibbons Edible Wild Plants by John Kallas Ph.D. Animating the Battles and Mythology of Greek Vases “Combat,” part of the Ure Discovery series from Panoply animating Greek vases (GIF Hrag Vartanian/Hyperallergic, via YouTube) Greek vases have some of the most lively of ancient art with their flat figures engaged in combat, sports, and epic mythology. A duo called Panoply has been turning these vases into animations to explore their stories and make classical archaeology more engaging for a younger crowd. Still from “Clash of the Dicers” (2014) (GIF Hrag Vartanian/Hyperallergic, via YouTube) Animator Steve K.

Knowth Flint macehead, Neolithic bowl, Ceremonial Axe This ceremonial macehead, found beneath the eastern chamber tomb at the great passage tomb at Knowth, in the Boyne Valley, is one of the finest works of art to have survived from Neolithic Europe. The unknown artist took a piece of very hard pale-grey flint, flecked with patches of brown, and carved each of its six surfaces with diamond shapes and swirling spirals. At the front they seem to form a human face, with the shaft hole as a gaping mouth. If it was made in Ireland, the object suggests that someone on the island had attained a very high degree of technical and artistic sophistication. The archaeologist Joseph Fenwick has suggested that the precision of the carving could have been attained only with a rotary drill, a “machine very similar to that used to apply the surface decoration to latter-day prestige objects such as Waterford Crystal”.

Medieval Demographics Made Easy Fantasy worlds come in many varieties, from the "hard core" medieval-simulation school to the more fanciful realms of high fantasy, with alabaster castles and jeweled gardens in the place of the more traditional muddy squalor. Despite their differences, these share a vital common element: ordinary people. Most realms of fantasy, no matter how baroque or magical, can not get by without a supply of ordinary farmers, merchants, quarreling princes and palace guards. Clustered into villages and crowding the cities, they provide the human backdrop for adventure. Of course, doing the research necessary to find out how common a large city should be, or how many shoemakers can be found in a town, can take up time not all GMs have available. To the end of more satisfying world design, I've prepared this article.

Sallust — The War With Catiline p3 Sallust The War With Catiline It behooves all men who wish to excel the other animals to strive with might and main not to pass through life unheralded, like the beasts, which Nature has fashioned grovelling and slaves to the belly. 2 All our power, on the contrary, lies in both mind and body; we employ the mind to rule, the body rather to serve; the one we have in common with the Gods, the other with the brutes. 3 Therefore I find it becoming, in seeking renown, that we should employ the resources of the intellect rather than those of brute strength, to the end that, since the span of life which we enjoy is short, we may make the memory of our lives as long as possible. 4 For the renown which riches or beauty confer is fleeting and frail; mental excellence is a splendid and lasting possession. p5 2 Accordingly in the beginning kings (for that was the first title of sovereignty among men), took different courses, some training their minds and others their bodies.

Vegetables that boost your immune system (NaturalNews) Because of the proliferation of health problems, people are constantly looking for ways to strengthen their immune system. While most resort to finding supplements and other health products, you can actually raise your immunity by simply eating your vegetables. Following is a list of vegetables you should eat for an improved immune system. 1. Paint It Black? Understanding Black Figure Pottery We at Ancient History Encyclopedia are fierce about historical accuracy. This often leads to debate and discussion among the AHE team as we try to sort out what really happened in ancient history, when, and why. So when I read our definition on black figure pottery last week, I was extremely confused.

Wan Muhuggiag (Muhjaij) Mummy, Tashwinat, Libya The Wan Muhuggiag Mummy, on display at the Assaraya. Discovery: The Tashwinat Mummy is a small mummy of a child, discovered in a small cave in Wan Muhuggiag, in the Acacus massif (Tadrart Acacus), Fezzan, Libya, by Professor Fabrizio Mori in 1958. The mummy is currently on display at the Assaraya Alhamra Museum (gallery 4) in Tripoli. The name Muhuggiag appears in various forms, including Wan Mughjaj, Uan Mugjaj (probably a typing error of: Muhjaj), Wan Mahugag, and Uan Muhuggiag. The local pronunciation of the name gives: Muhjaij: /mouhjeej/. history and geography of europe: euratlas.net Historical Maps Euratlas Periodis Historical Atlas of Europe History of Europe A sequence of 21 maps showing the European states as they were at the end of each century from 1 to 2000. Aegean Area History

Fasces An unusual fasces image, with the axe on the outside of the bundle of rods. Origin and symbolism[edit] Although little is known about the Etruscans, a few artifacts have been found showing a thin bundle of rods surrounding a two-headed axe.[3] Fasces-symbolism might derive—via the Etruscans—from the eastern Mediterranean, with the labrys, the Anatolian and Minoan double-headed axe, later incorporated into the praetorial fasces. Description of the Chakras Written by © Ewald Berkers What chakras are and their psychological properties Chakras are centers of energy, located on the midline of the body.

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