background preloader

Visualizing Economics

Visualizing Economics
My first bar chart illustrates changes in family spending over the 20th century and is based on a report of consumer expenditure data and decennial census reports. This graph shows how the spending on food, clothing and housing has become a smaller percentage of the average family budget, to just over 50%. I them created a second bar chart presenting family spending data in 2009 across different income groups to show how the average family at the beginning of the 20th century was poorer relative to low-income families today when looking at spending patterns. However, this consumer data focuses on families income groups below $150,000 a year and does not tell us what the spending patterns of the top 1% (incomes above $350,000) or top 0.1% (incomes above $1.5 million) Read Online to view all to the graphics from my book. These graphs were created using OmniGraphSketcher copied into Adobe Illustrator for additional annotations.

http://visualizingeconomics.com/

Related:  Sources on Data VisualizationFiscal Education

Data visualization tools for Linux A short list of visualization tools In this article, I provide a survey of a number of popular Linux data visualization tools and include some insight into their other capabilities. For example, does the tool provide a language for numerical computation? Is the tool interactive or does it operate solely in batch mode?

Understanding the Ruling Elite The elite are trusted placeholders sitting atop hierarchical structures that own or at least influence massive financial and physical resources whose husbandry they have been trained to manage. They are ultimately trained decision makers reacting to proposals that finally cross their desks. To assign them the ability to actually conspire to a common goal is laughable. 50 Great Examples of Data Visualization Wrapping your brain around data online can be challenging, especially when dealing with huge volumes of information. And trying to find related content can also be difficult, depending on what data you’re looking for. But data visualizations can make all of that much easier, allowing you to see the concepts that you’re learning about in a more interesting, and often more useful manner.

Company Blog - Breaking Bin Laden: visualizing the power of a single tweet A full hour before the formal announcement of Bin-Laden’s death, Keith Urbahn posted his speculation on the emergency presidential address. Little did he know that this Tweet would trigger an avalanche of reactions, Retweets and conversations that would beat mainstream media as well as the White House announcement. Keith Urbahn wasn’t the first to speculate Bin Laden’s death, but he was the one who gained the most trust from the network. Why did this happen? Before May 1st, not even the smartest of machine learning algorithms could have predicted Keith Urbahn’s online relevancy score, or his potential to spark an incredibly viral information flow. While politicos “in the know” certainly knew him or of him, his previous interactions and size and nature of his social graph did little to reflect his potential to generate thousands of people’s willingness to trust within a matter of minutes.

Visualized: Over 4 Million Micro-Loans Fly Around the Globe Kiva is a company that facilitates micro-loans between people from all over the world; incidentally, nothing to do with the Finnish KiVA. With the help of this non-profit, anyone can donate as little as $25 or as much as the sum of any single loan — you can read the stories of many different people seeking financial support across the globe; there are students, farmers, entrepreneurs and those looking to improve their physical living conditions. Kiva released a video visualizing the micro-loans that happened across the world in its five-year lifespan — a total of 4 million loans in 4 minutes: 620,000 lenders funding 615,000 entrepreneurs. Get inspired, and make a loan today — it’s a simple way to help a real person.

The Work of Edward Tufte and Graphics Press Graphics Press LLC P.O. Box 430 Cheshire, CT 06410 800 822-2454 Edward Tufte is a statistician and artist, and Professor Emeritus of Political Science, Statistics, and Computer Science at Yale University. He wrote, designed, and self-published 4 classic books on data visualization. The New York Times described ET as the "Leonardo da Vinci of data," and Business Week as the "Galileo of graphics." Ellen Brown on Deficits Don't Matter This is a pretty decent article on the intricacies of public finance and made pretty easy to understand. The reader needs to be able to get his perceptions turned upside down though. What is important is to understand that much as passes for financial wisdom or at least self evident is wrong. If it helps, it is enough to remember that a dollar bill is created by an act of government, sent forth as expenditure in a multiple of ways and it is then taxed back at sometime in the future.

Physics Simulations and Artwork Here is a 3D view of a hydrogren atom in the 4f state. The left image was made in C++ using a technique described by Krzysztof Marczak to make it volumetric like a cloud of smoke. The right image was made in Mathematica by adding 2D cross-sectional layers. 20 Great Visualizations of 2011 As the popularity of visualizations grows, so does their range and quality. Here’s a list of 20 of the best Static Visualizations, Interactive Visualizations, and Information Videos from 2011. (Note: while they are numbered for your convenience, the entries are not ranked.) Static Visualizations

Data Visualization: Modern Approaches - Smashing Magazine Data presentation can be beautiful, elegant and descriptive. There is a variety of conventional ways to visualize data – tables, histograms, pie charts and bar graphs are being used every day, in every project and on every possible occasion. However, to convey a message to your readers effectively, sometimes you need more than just a simple pie chart of your results. Graphic Sociology Cairo, Alberto. (2013) The Functional Art: An introduction to information graphics and visualization. Berkeley: New Riders, a division of Pearson. Overview A functional art is a book in divided into four parts, but really it is easier to understand as only two parts. The first part is a sustained and convincingly argument that information graphics and data visualizations are technologies, not art, and that there are good reasons to follow certain guiding principles when reading and designing them. It is written by Alberto Cairo, a professor of journalism at the University of Miami an information graphics journalist who has had the not always pleasant experience of trying to apply functional rules in organizational structures that occasionally prefer formal rules.

No One Wants to See the Process - Mom and Dad Money, LLC If you’re reading this blog, chances are that you’re trying to do something to improve your financial situation. Maybe you’re just starting out, really thinking purposefully about money for the first time. Or maybe you’ve been trying to make things better for a while, but you’ve hit some roadblocks and you’re not sure what to do next. In either case, you have questions and doubts. And in those moments, it’s easy to look around and find people who already are where you want to be. You look at them and think something along the lines of: “Man, if only I could be like them.

Related:  Visual ThinkinginspirationVisualizationsData VisualisationA - MiscellaneaInspirations