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To tell someone they're wrong, first tell them how they're right — Quartz. For a firm that makes most of its money selling software and cloud services, Microsoft sure wants to look like a hardware company.

To tell someone they're wrong, first tell them how they're right — Quartz

Alongside new features for Windows 10, Microsoft execs spent more than an hour of the company’s event on Oct. 26 pitching new computers, VR headsets, and accessories focused on artists and designers. When it comes to Microsoft’s bottom line, hardware sales are just a drop in the bucket. And while niche-targeted products like creative-friendly desktops are unlikely to change that, new hardware puts the company right next to Apple in the headlines. They also paint a clear picture of the message Microsoft wants investors and consumers to hear: Macs are over, and PCs are once again for creative types. In a hardware landscape that has users living in fear of which port Apple will nix next, the strategy just might work.

Surface Studio Today’s largest announcement was a 28″ 4K desktop PC called the Surface Studio. Windows 10 Creators Edition. 35 Incredible Tim Berners-Lee Quotes. Sir Tim Berners-Lee is an English computer scientist and is also known as the inventor of the World Wide Web.

35 Incredible Tim Berners-Lee Quotes

As the founder and director of the World Wide Consortium (W3C), he oversees the mission, freedom, and openness of the Web. 18 Greatest Robert Hooke Quotes. Robert Hooke was an English philosopher, architect, and polymath.

18 Greatest Robert Hooke Quotes

Hooke is known as one of the greatest experimental scientists of the seventeenth century. With a broad scope of interest ranging from physics and astronomy to chemistry and biology, Hooke invested many historic mechanical components and instruments. Here is a short listing to some of the greatest Robert Hooke quotes from his life. “By the help of microscopes, there is nothing so small, as to escape our inquiry; hence there is a new visible world discovered to the understanding.”

Philosophers: The Ancient Romans

Epistemology. Epistemology ( i/ᵻˌpɪstᵻˈmɒlədʒi/; from Greek ἐπιστήμη, epistēmē, meaning "knowledge", and λόγος, logos, meaning "logical discourse") is the branch of philosophy concerned with the theory of knowledge.[1] Epistemology studies the nature of knowledge, justification, and the rationality of belief.

Epistemology

Much of the debate in epistemology centers on four areas: (1) the philosophical analysis of the nature of knowledge and how it relates to such concepts as truth, belief, and justification,[2][3] (2) various problems of skepticism, (3) the sources and scope of knowledge and justified belief, and (4) the criteria for knowledge and justification. The term 'Epistemology' was first used by Scottish philosopher James Frederick Ferrier in 1854. [a] However, according to Brett Warren, King James VI of Scotland had previously personified this philosophical concept as the character Epistemon in 1591.[5] Epistemon[edit] Etymology[edit] Knowledge[edit] Belief[edit] Truth[edit] What Is Love? Famous Definitions from 400 Years of Literary History. By Maria Popova “Love has nothing to do with what you are expecting to get — only with what you are expecting to give — which is everything.”

What Is Love? Famous Definitions from 400 Years of Literary History

After those collections of notable definitions of art, science, and philosophy, what better way to start a new year than with a selection of poetic definitions of a peculiar phenomenon that is at once more amorphous than art, more single-minded than science, and more philosophical than philosophy itself? Carl Sagan on Science and Spirituality. An Antidote to the Age of Anxiety: Alan Watts on Happiness and How to Live with Presence. By Maria Popova Wisdom on overcoming the greatest human frustration from the pioneer of Eastern philosophy in the West.

An Antidote to the Age of Anxiety: Alan Watts on Happiness and How to Live with Presence

“How we spend our days is, of course, how we spend our lives,” Annie Dillard wrote in her timeless reflection on presence over productivity — a timely antidote to the central anxiety of our productivity-obsessed age. Indeed, my own New Year’s resolution has been to stop measuring my days by degree of productivity and start experiencing them by degree of presence. But what, exactly, makes that possible? 20-Year-Old Hunter S. Thompson’s Superb Advice on How to Find Your Purpose and Live a Meaningful Life. As a hopeless lover of both letters and famous advice, I was delighted to discover a letter 20-year-old Hunter S.

20-Year-Old Hunter S. Thompson’s Superb Advice on How to Find Your Purpose and Live a Meaningful Life

Thompson — gonzo journalism godfather, pundit of media politics, dark philosopher — penned to his friend Hume Logan in 1958. Found in Letters of Note: Correspondence Deserving of a Wider Audience (public library | IndieBound) — the aptly titled, superb collection based on Shaun Usher’s indispensable website of the same name — the letter is an exquisite addition to luminaries’ reflections on the meaning of life, speaking to what it really means to find your purpose. Cautious that “all advice can only be a product of the man who gives it” — a caveat other literary legends have stressed with varying degrees of irreverence — Thompson begins with a necessary disclaimer about the very notion of advice-giving: Susan Cain on the Power of Introverts, Live-Illustrated by Molly Crabapple.

How to Be Alone: An Antidote to One of the Central Anxieties and Greatest Paradoxes of Our Time. The Shortness of Life: Seneca on Busyness and the Art of Living Wide Rather Than Living Long. “How we spend our days,” Annie Dillard memorably wrote in her soul-stretching meditation on the life of presence, “is, of course, how we spend our lives.”

The Shortness of Life: Seneca on Busyness and the Art of Living Wide Rather Than Living Long

And yet most of us spend our days in what Kierkegaard believed to be our greatest source of unhappiness — a refusal to recognize that “busy is a decision” and that presence is infinitely more rewarding than productivity. I frequently worry that being productive is the surest way to lull ourselves into a trance of passivity and busyness the greatest distraction from living, as we coast through our lives day after day, showing up for our obligations but being absent from our selves, mistaking the doing for the being.

Despite a steadily swelling human life expectancy, these concerns seem more urgent than ever — and yet they are hardly unique to our age. How to Live: Lessons from Montaigne, Godfather of Blogging. By Maria Popova Don’t worry about death, pay attention, read a lot, give up control, embrace imperfection.

How to Live: Lessons from Montaigne, Godfather of Blogging

“Living has yet to be generally recognized as one of the arts,” Karl De Schweinitz wrote in his 1924 guide to the art of living. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Philosophy of religion. Perennial philosophy. The Perennial philosophy (Latin: philosophia perennis), [note 1] also referred to as Perennialism, is a perspective in the philosophy of religion which views each of the world’s religious traditions as sharing a single, universal truth on which the foundation of all religious knowledge and doctrine has grown.

Perennial philosophy

Agostino Steuco (1497–1548) coined the term philosophia perennis,[1] drawing on the neo-Platonic philosophy of Marsilio Ficino (1433–1499) and Giovanni Pico della Mirandola (1463–94). In the early 19th century this idea was popularised by the Transcendentalists. A good question - my attempt in answering it. The Thoughts of the Emperor Marcus Aurelius Antoninus. Baruch Spinoza. 1. Biography Bento (in Hebrew, Baruch; in Latin, Benedictus: all three names mean "blessed") Spinoza was born in 1632 in Amsterdam.

He was the middle son in a prominent family of moderate means in Amsterdam's Portuguese-Jewish community. As a boy he had undoubtedly been one of the star pupils in the congregation's Talmud Torah school. He was intellectually gifted, and this could not have gone unremarked by the congregation's rabbis. And then, on July 27, 1656, Spinoza was issued the harshest writ of herem, or excommunication, ever pronounced by the Sephardic community of Amsterdam; it was never rescinded. Reason. Psychologists and cognitive scientists have attempted to study and explain how people reason, e.g. which cognitive and neural processes are engaged, and how cultural factors affect the inferences that people draw. The field of automated reasoning studies how reasoning may or may not be modeled computationally. Animal psychology considers the question of whether animals other than humans can reason. To Live at All is Miracle Enough.

I read Richard Dawkins book ‘Unweaving the Rainbow’ a little while ago and there was a part that really brought me up short with one of those ‘WOW’ moments. It really brings home the sheer unliklihood and odds against any of us actually being born and being able to experience and enjoy this only too brief sojourn on earth. Belief. Top 100 Western Philosophers: from Ancient to Contemporary Philosophers. This article shows the top 100 most important philosophers in the Western civilization from the ancient Greek classics such As Socrates, Plato and Aristotle’s to contemporary philosophers such as Levi-Strauss and Foucault, passing by great masters such as Descartes or Spinoza. Brain Pickings.