background preloader

Australie / Grande barrière de corail

Facebook Twitter

A cause du blanchissement, une partie de la Grande barrière de corail serait condamnée. <div class="notice" id="noscript"><div class="error">Pour regarder cette vid&eacute;o, vous devez activer JavaScript.

A cause du blanchissement, une partie de la Grande barrière de corail serait condamnée

</div><a href=" target="_blank">Comment activer JavaScript</a><img height="100%" src=" width="100%"></div> The Great Barrier Reef has been brutally bleached for the second year in a row. Contrary to what you may have heard, the reef isn’t dead — not yet.

The Great Barrier Reef has been brutally bleached for the second year in a row.

But aerial surveys show that 900 miles of the 1,400-mile-long reef have been severely bleached in the past two years. Bleaching occurs when warm water causes stressed-out corals to expel symbiotic algae from their tissues; corals then lose their color and their chief source of food, making them more likely to die. Last year’s El Niño–induced bleaching event was devastating, knocking out two-thirds of the corals in the northern section of the reef. We’d hoped that 2017 would bring cooler temperatures, giving the fragile ecosystem some much needed R&R. Instead, temperatures on Australia’s east coast were still hotter than average in the early months of this year, and on top of that, the reef’s midsection took a hit from a big cyclone in March.

This is the first time the reef has experienced back-to-back annual bleaching events. Think you’ve had it rough this past year? You should hear what the Great Barrier Reef is dealing with. According to the cover article in today’s issue of the journal Nature, the iconic reef off the coast of Australia suffered unprecedented coral die-off after last year’s record-breaking bleaching event.

Think you’ve had it rough this past year? You should hear what the Great Barrier Reef is dealing with.

Now, as the Southern Hemisphere hits late summer temperatures, central and southern sections of the reef — areas which avoided the worst of last year’s bleaching — are in trouble. “We didn’t expect to see this level of destruction to the Great Barrier Reef for another 30 years,” coral researcher Terry Hughes told the New York Times. Hughes led the team that conducted aerial surveys to document the bleaching last year, as well as subsequent surveys to assess just how much of that bleaching turned into dying.

Pétitions

Frappée par le blanchissement, la Grande Barrière de corail inquiète les scientifiques. Une nouvelle étude aérienne menée sur une portion de la Grande barrière de corail dévoile des résultats très préoccupants sur le blanchissement des récifs.

Frappée par le blanchissement, la Grande Barrière de corail inquiète les scientifiques

A l’heure de dresser le bilan sur la santé des écosystèmes marins, un nouveau rapport centré sur la Grande barrière de corail dévoile une fois encore des résultats accablants. The Great Barrier Reef’s no good, very bad year will test how fast it can adapt. If you haven’t seen a coral reef for yourself, it can be hard to tell what the fuss over the global coral crisis is all about.

The Great Barrier Reef’s no good, very bad year will test how fast it can adapt

From above, a healthy reef is dark, a shadow in the water, soaking up the sun against the pale sand in shallow, clear water. When a reef starts to bleach, it turns visibly white — often the crown of the reef will go first, where the coral in the shallowest water experience the hottest temperatures, leaving white speckles ringed in the darker, deeper corals. From above, these bleached reefs look like long streamers of white rubble against the blue backdrop. These days, bleached reefs are what you’re most likely to see. Terry Hughes, a coral researcher at James Cook University, convened a task force that carried out an aerial study to figure out just how many reefs are still healthy in the northern section of the 1,400-mile-long Great Barrier Reef. Advertisement – Article continues below A bleached coal is not necessarily a dead coral. Yet there is a bright side. Great Barrier Reef will be smothered with silt, because coal.

Australia’s Great Barrier Reef Marine Park — a supposedly protected natural area containing thousands of reefs, which together are visible from space and attract nearly $6 billion a year in tourism — is a pretty terrible place to dump loads of silt.

Great Barrier Reef will be smothered with silt, because coal

But it’s happening: The federal agency that governs the reef approved plans to dump up to 3 million cubic meters of silt that will be dredged from the marine park to help carve a superhighway for tankers ferrying coal to Asia. It’s the final piece in Australian Prime Minister (and known climate denier) Tony Abbott’s already-approved master plan to dredge the shipping lane, expand an existing coal terminal, and extensively mine the northeastern state of Queensland for coal. Reuters reports that backers of the coal export project, including two Indian firms and the heiress to an Australian mining empire, hope to deliver an estimated $28 billion of coal to Asian markets once it’s complete.

Lend Lease: Don't invest in reef destruction. A global construction firm wants to build a massive coal port right next to Australia’s Great Barrier Reef -- putting this precious international treasure at grave risk.

Lend Lease: Don't invest in reef destruction.

It’s hard to believe anyone would do this -- but Lend Lease says they want to. The company is already under huge pressure in Australia, where SumOfUs members and others are speaking out. » Grande Barrière de Corail Tropical Seas Australie Océanie Géographie. June 14, 2013 Grande Barrière de Corail Tropical Seas Australie Océanie Géographie Desktop Wallpapers and Backgrounds Select Resolution: Your screen resolution is set at: 1600 x 1200 pixels ads728x15.

» Grande Barrière de Corail Tropical Seas Australie Océanie Géographie

Great Barrier Reef bombing the latest mishap from 'war games' The bombing of the Great Barrier Reef by the US military may seem astonishing to some Australians but to the band of community activists opposed to "war games" in Queensland, the mishap is just the latest in a series of grievances.

Great Barrier Reef bombing the latest mishap from 'war games'

The biannual Talisman Saber exercise has attracted community dissent since it started in 2005, long before last week's incident where four unarmed bombs were ditched in the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park by two jets running low on fuel. A special "re-zoning" of the Great Barrier Reef marine park in 2003 allowed for the sprawling Shoalwater Bay military training area, which is periodically used for joint US-Australian military training exercises, with licence to strafe places such as Townshend Island, the target of last week's botched drill.

Critics who live in nearby towns such as Yeppoon have complained about noise from explosions and low-flying aircraft. Then there are the environmental concerns. "A big problem is the run-off into the reef. La Grande barrière de corail menacée par le charbon australien. Une fois de plus, croissance économique et protection de l’environnement s’affrontent.

La Grande barrière de corail menacée par le charbon australien

Dernier exemple en date : la Grande barrière de corail, le plus grand ensemble corallien de la planète, qui abrite une exceptionnelle biodiversité, s’avère menacée par la flambée de l’activité minière − essentiellement de charbon − et de l’exploration de gaz en Australie, selon l’Organisation des Nations unies pour l’éducation, la science et la culture (Unesco). « La Grande barrière de corail se trouve actuellement à un carrefour et les décisions qui seront prises au cours des deux ou trois prochaines années pourraient être cruciales pour la conservation à long terme du récif », s’inquiète, cité par le Guardian, l’organisme onusien, dont une délégation d’experts est arrivée sur la côte est de l’Australie, mercredi 7 mars, pour une mission de dix jours de contrôle des ports.

L’Unesco, de même que les associations écologistes, voit ainsi d’un mauvais œil ces deux chantiers. L'Australie va-t-elle sacrifier sa Grande Barrière de Corail au gaz de schiste? Par: Caroline Albert 25/04/13 - 12h01. La Grande Barrière de Corail de nouveau menacée par l'extraction de gaz de schiste. Le plus grand récif corallien du monde est de nouveau menacé par les extractions de gaz de schiste.

Le gouvernement australien projette d'interdire toute activité de ce type sous la Grande Barrière de Corail. A quelques mois des élections fédérales, les enjeux sont grands sur un des plus beau littoral qui existe. Australie: La grande barri re de corail menac e par le boom de l'exploitation mini re. Great Barrier Reef Under Threat. An urgent threat to the Great Barrier Reef. 450,509 have signed. Let's get to 1,500,000 Update: 31 January 2014 The Australian government is turning its back on the Reef, and decided to open the door to dredging and dumping in the Marine Protected area.

But right now the main investor can't finance for these projects -- let's keep upping the pressure on them to make sure they never do and keep the reef safe despite the terrible government decision! Update: 15 August 2013 Round one to the people! Posted: 26 July 2013 It would be hard to make this stuff up. This is a terrible idea with devastating consequences, and the investor group Aurizon that’s backing it know it. If one million of us express our head-shaking disbelief at this crazy project in the next few days, we can help get Aurizon to pull funding and maybe even persuade the Australian PM to step in.

L'Australie admet sa négligence dans la protection de la Grande barrière. Great Barrier Reef's condition declined from moderate to poor in 2011. An alarming set of reports on the condition of the Great Barrier Reef published on Wednesday say its overall condition in 2011 declined from moderate to poor, and highlights that reef-wide coral cover has declined by 50% since 1985. The series of reports blame part of the reef's poor health in 2011 on extreme weather conditions including tropical cyclone Yasi, and high rainfall which resulted in "higher than average discharge" from a number of river catchments runoffs. The Great Barrier Reef report card of 2011 said: "These extreme weather events significantly impacted the overall condition of the marine environment which declined from moderate to poor overall in 2010–2011.

" The report card also examines the water quality of the region, and showed that the majority of land managers within the Great Barrier Reef region had failed to reach their reef plan targets, aimed at reducing sediment and pesticide loads which are harmful to water quality. Photos - La Grande barrière de corail a perdu la moitié de ses coraux en 27 ans. Avez-vous déjà partagé cet article?