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Why are the French on strike ... again? The French government has been scrambling to keep gas stations from running dry and cities powered after workers at oil refineries and nuclear plants walked off the job weeks ago, but its worries grew worse Wednesday as transportation workers joined the strike, hitting the country's rail and metro networks.

Why are the French on strike ... again?

Just a third of rail services are running Thursday, and some air traffic controllers went on strike this week, grounding at least 10,000 British airline passengers. Some have agreed to return to work over the weekend, while pilots have said they will go on strike next week. In the industrial port town of Le Havre, workers who usually drive trains, sell tickets and maintain stations stormed the tracks Thursday to protest, only to be met by a storm of tear gas from riot police. Euro 2016 football tournament in France could be terror target, US warns. Image copyright Reuters The US has warned that the Euro 2016 football championship being held in France next month could be a target of militant attacks.

Euro 2016 football tournament in France could be terror target, US warns

"The large number of tourists visiting Europe in the summer months will present greater targets for terrorists," the State Department said. The event is being hosted from 10 June to 10 July at various venues. France is already under a state of emergency following last year's Islamist-claimed attacks in Paris. France’s Socialist Government Survives a Vote, but Remains Fractured. Mr.

France’s Socialist Government Survives a Vote, but Remains Fractured

Hollande’s weakened condition has attracted predators not just on the left of his own party, but on the right as well. Mr. Macron, a former banker who is market-oriented by conviction, has started his own political movement, “On the Way,” much to the irritation of his colleagues in the government. Yet the youthful Mr. Macron — he is only 38 — is way ahead of Mr. Paris attacks: What happened on the night. Image copyright EPA/EPA/Reu The attacks in Paris on the night of Friday 13 November by gunmen and suicide bombers hit a concert hall, a major stadium, restaurants and bars, almost simultaneously - and left 130 people dead and hundreds wounded.

Paris attacks: What happened on the night

The attacks were described by President Francois Hollande as an "act of war" organised by the Islamic State (IS) militant group. France oil strikes: Government is 'weak, cowardly and at a total loss of authority,' says Nicolas Sarkozy. At Paris Exhibition, Tracing the Roots of the Velvet Underground. Revelation on Brussels Attackers Fuels Fears of New Assaults. It is sobering to look at the number of people believed to have some connection to the Paris and Brussels attacks: 36 are suspected of being active participants to varying degrees in organizing or carrying them out.

Revelation on Brussels Attackers Fuels Fears of New Assaults

Of those, 13 are dead, and most of the rest are in custody. A handful have been released but are subject to conditions, like daily check-ins at a police station. Others are probably lying low or on the run. What worries investigators is that many of the participants in the Paris-Brussels network were recruited by a preacher in the Brussels district of Molenbeek, Khalid Zerkani. Heavy rain brings floods to northern France. Image copyright AFP Torrential rain has continued to lash northern Europe, causing extensive flooding in France, Belgium and Germany.

Heavy rain brings floods to northern France

The River Seine in Paris burst its banks, and the French Open tennis tournament in the city was hit for a second day by the miserable weather. In the centre of the country a prison had to be evacuated, with detainees bussed to other facilities. The Latest: Le Havre Citizens Not Worried About Lack of Fuel. The Latest on France's strikes and protests against the government's labor reforms (all times local): 10:30 p.m.

The Latest: Le Havre Citizens Not Worried About Lack of Fuel

Residents in the English Channel port city of Le Havre have mixed feelings about the crippling strikes against a divisive labor law reform in France. While some are fearful of dangerous fuel shortages, others are more stoic.