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How To Grow An Avocado Tree. You can make some pretty tasty dishes with an avocado but did you know that you can grow a tree from it too? It probably won’t produce any fruit, but it is a nice addition to your home plant life. For best chance of success, try this with a pit that has been taken from a very (very) ripe avocado that hasn’t been refrigerated. You may also want to start 2 or 3 at a time in case one fails. Tip: If you have plenty of sunny locations in your home, you could start several of these in the early Fall and have a bunch to sell at your annual summer yard sale or donate to church raffles, team fundraisers, etc.

Directions: Another Option: Push pit into a mix of sand and potting soil (pointy side up) with the top half above soil surface. Another Method: Wrap in moist paper towel and place in a ziploc baggy, seal. How to Turn a Pallet into a Garden. Good news and bad news. I had planned to film a short video showing you how to make a pallet garden, but the weather didn’t cooperate. I was stapling the landscape fabric onto the pallet when it started drizzling and got really windy. That’s the bad news. But I know I promised a tutorial today, so I took photos and have kept my word to share how to make the pallet garden. I tried to be as detailed as possible. So keep reading my pallet loving friends, instructions on how to make your own pallet garden are just a few lines away… Find a Pallet The first thing you need to do is–obviously–find a pallet.

Don’t just take the first pallet you find. Collect Your Supplies For this project, you’ll need the pallet you found, 2 large bags of potting soil, 16 six packs of annual flowers (one six pack per opening on the face of the pallet, and two six packs per opening on the top of the completed pallet garden), a small roll of landscape fabric, a staple gun, staples, and sand paper. Now for the sides. Organic Gardening: Summer Garden: Watering, Weeding, Harvesting. Easy vegetables to grow. Planting a garden doesn’t have to be a huge undertaking. But the fear of failure keeps many a gardener-wannabe from spending time and energy on planting backyard crops. Knowing the easy vegetables to grow for your region — in addition to when and where to plant them — is the best way to ensure success.

When planning your crops, try to space out the planting of foods that have a short harvest season. An ideal garden will always have something to put on the table, rather than an abundant period and then a dry spell with nothing growing. Some of the easiest garden goods for first timers are yellow squash and zucchini, potatoes, radishes and tomatoes. Since potatoes and zucchinis can overtake your garden, consider using an appropriately sized planting container to control their growth in a small space. The best way to start potatoes is by using the little eyes that sprout from older potatoes. Radishes are another no-brainer crop. Tomatoes are possibly the most popular garden vegetable. You Grow Girl | Gardening for the People. Top Ten Most Nutritious Vegetables and How to Grow Them in Your Garden.

A perfectly ripe, juicy tomato, still warm from the sun. Sweet carrots, pulled from the garden minutes (or even seconds!) Before they're eaten. Growing your own vegetables is one of those activities that balances practicality and indulgence. In addition to the convenience of having the fixings for a salad or light supper right outside your door (or on your windowsill), when you grow your own vegetables, you're getting the most nutritional bang for your buck as well.

Vegetables start losing nutrients as soon as they're harvested, and quality diminishes as sugars are turned into starches. Broccoli is high in calcium, iron, and magnesium, as well as vitamins A, B6, and C. How to grow broccoliGrow broccoli in containers: One broccoli plant per pot, pots should be 12 to 16 inches deep.What to watch out for: Cabbage worm. 2. There is nothing like peas grown right in your own garden — the tender sweetness of a snap pea just plucked from the vine is unlike anything you can buy in at a store. How to Grow Vegetables | Guide to Growing Vegetables. Some general considerations for growing vegetables: Sowing Tips When sowing seeds, a good general rule of thumb is to sow to a depth of approximately twice the thickness of the seed. Some smaller seeds require light to germinate and should not be sown too deep; otherwise they may never germinate or break through the surface of the soil.

Conversely, large seeds planted too shallow may not develop properly. Keep seeds well-moistened while awaiting germination and check regularly. Smaller seeds should be watered with care so as not to disturb or displace beneath the soil. Select a light-weight, well-drained medium for sowing to ensure good seed to soil contact. Growing Tips Most vegetables will produce better results if sown and grown in a soil-medium that is well-drained, rich in organic matter (fertile), and fairly lightweight. Most vegetables will prefer good quantities of natural, direct sunlight daily. Harvesting and Seed Saving. Growing Your Own Garlic - Planting Growing Harvesting and Storing Garlic. As far as I'm concerned, garlic gets the blue ribbon for growing your own. It's absurdly easy to plant and care for; it tastes great; it looks beautiful and it takes up so little ground that even those with very small gardens can raise enough to be self-sufficient in garlic for a good part of the year.

All you have to do is choose the right varieties; plant at the right time, in the right soil; then harvest when just right and store correctly. 1. Choosing Types of Garlic If you look in a specialist catalog like the one at Gourmet Garlic Gardens, you'll find dozens of varieties of garlic listed. The folks at Filaree Farm, who offer a hundred, divide them into seven groups: Rocambole, Purple Stripe, Porcelain, Artichoke, Silverskin, Asiatic Turban and Creole. You see where this is going – and you can see a lot more types of garlic on either of those websites, but for general purposes the most important difference is the one between softneck and hardneck. 2. 3.

Tips for cutting garlic scapes: Planting A Pineapple — Eat Laugh Surf. Did y’all know that you can take this and turn it into… This? And that this will eventually produce… This? Yes, I’m talking about turning your average, ordinary grocery store pineapple into a tropical showpiece within your home. Planting a Pineapple 1. 2. 3. In 24 months (sounds better than two years) it will look like this. You will have an actual, large, utterly delicious pineapple in 24-36 months.

The thought of growing my own pineapple always makes me smile and giggle just a little bit. Now what am I supposed to do with all of this leftover pineapple? I see something sweet coming soon. While you’re waiting for me to make something yummy with the leftovers, go ahead and plant a pineapple. Be adventurous plant a pineapple. Hugs, Tickled Red *Please bear in mind that I am not a hortoculturist. Tagged as: Gardening, Pineapple, Tropical Fruit. 5 Secrets to a ‘No-work’ Garden. It took over 20 years of gardening to realize that I didn’t have to work so hard to achieve a fruitful harvest. As the limitless energy of my youth gradually gave way to the physical realities of mid-life, the slow accretion of experience eventually led to an awareness that less work can result in greater crop yields.

Inspired in part by Masanobu Fukuoka’s book, One Straw Revolution, my family experimented with gardening methods which could increase yields with less effort. Fukuoka spent over three decades perfecting his so-called “do-nothing” technique: commonsense, sustainable practices that all but eliminate the use of pesticides, fertilizer, tillage, and perhaps most significantly, wasteful effort. Here are the strategies we used which enabled us to greatly increase our garden yield, while requiring less time and less work. 1. Use the ‘no-till’ method of gardening With ‘no-till’ gardening, weeding is largely eliminated. 2.

Once mulch is in place, it doesn’t need to be disturbed. 3. 4. Medieval New York: Cloisters Herb Garden. Back to Medieval New York Page The Bonnefont Cloister Herb Gardenby Sarah McGowan [mcgowan@murray.fordham.edu] Located in the Cloisters a branch of the Metropolitan Museum of Art (in Washington Heights, New York) The Cloister and Garden Themselves This cloister dates from the late thirteenth or early fourteenth century, containing capitals and some columns from the Cistercian abbey at Bonnefont-en-Comminges and other local religious foundations in the south of France. The simplicity of these capitals reflects the strict asceticism embodied by the Cistercian monastic order, shunning any decoration which might distract monks from the contemplation of God. The naturalistic floral patterns decorating the double capitals in this cloister are a reaction in form to the robust, grotesque figures of Romanesque cloister carvings.

The herb garden in the Bonnefont cloister contains more than 250 species of plants which were grown during the Middle Ages. Uses of Herbs in Medieval Life References Links. Explore Cornell - Home Gardening - Introduction. RHS Plant Selector. 17 Apart: Growing Celery Indoors: Never Buy Celery Again.

Remember when we tested and shared how to grow onions indefinitely last week? Well, at the same time, we've been testing out another little indoor gardening project first gleaned from Pinterest that we're excited to share the successes of today — regrowing celery from it's base. We've figured out how to literally re-grow organic celery from the base of the bunch we bought from the store a couple weeks ago. I swear, we must have been living under a rock all these years or just not be that resourceful when it comes to food, but we're having more fun learning all these new little tips and tricks as we dive deeper into trying to grow more of our own food. This project is almost as simple as the onion growing project — simply chop the celery stalks from the base of the celery you bought from the store and use as you normally would. We let our celery base hang out in the saucer of water for right around one week, give or take. Update 2: Here's how we are looking at almost 3-4 weeks of growth:

Vegetable Spacing Guide". VERTICAL HERB GARDENS - gardening, planting, nature, garden, sustainable lifestyle, do-it-yourself, creative environmental options, craft, organics, gardening, planting, flower pots, reusing, old and vintage, nature, environmental news, recycling tips, br. Comments on 04/22 at 01:35 AM Oh wow, I like this too. I'll have to research this...like how do they get the plants to stay in the box?! I also like the boxes themselves.

I am hoping to build a similar one soon for a tabletop salad garden. on 04/22 at 12:56 PM Hey! I want to build one too! On 04/22 at 01:00 PM My question would be how to water it. on 04/22 at 01:02 PM Inside the house environment. on 04/29 at 12:33 PM Wow, that's pretty awesome (not really a word I use that often!). On 05/26 at 03:40 AM Idon't know if you can do vertical planting, but I am doing an art project in which I give out seeds of trees that survived the atomic bombing to the people of US and the world.

On 05/28 at 01:14 PM Saw this article and it made me think of your post... The DIY Modern Outdoor Succulent Planter #2. Transformed :: Mason Jar Herb Garden. PHOTOS: Stunning Mason Jar Crafts. Fibre optic garden path lighting. How To Save Tomato Seeds {Plus Tips. When saving seeds from this year’s harvest for next year’s, you’ll find best results with heirloom tomatoes rather than hybrids (hybrids are typically the ones you purchase in grocery stores and regular greenhouse seedlings).

Once you make your initial purchase of heirlooms, you’ll be able to do this year after year. Farmers markets are a great place to find them. Here’s how you do it: Cut tomatoes in half then squeeze out the pulp into a clear glass container (wide mouth mason jar or small bowl for example).Add a couple tablespoons of water (double the amount if there isn’t much juice) then cover jar or container with a piece of cheesecloth (a coffee filter will work well too), secure in place with an elastic band.Leave the container to sit at room temperature for about 4 or 5 days until you notice a layer of white scum/mold form on the top (this process is fermenting).Skim off the white scum then pour into a large bowl, fill with cool water and let sit for a minute or two.

A few tips: