background preloader

Octopus

Facebook Twitter

Octopus steals camera and wins underwater photography competition - SCUBA News. This year’s Ocean Art Underwater Photo Competition managed to produce some amazing underwater photos that showcase the perseverance of underwater artistry amidst the adversity of the times.

Octopus steals camera and wins underwater photography competition - SCUBA News

Two winning photos told particularly compelling stories. The Best of Show by Gaetano Dario Gargiulo is a once-in-a-life-time moment where a curious octopus took a selfie of itself with the photographer’s family. Another notable photo is the winning image of the conservation category by Christophe Chellapermal which reflects on the need to preserve our environment as well as take care of ourselves. This picture was taken in Antibes on the French Riviera in the summer of 2020. Every week, activist Laurent Lombard with the NGO ‘Operation Mer Propre’ organizes meetings with local environmentalists in an effort to clean up the coast.

This amazing photo shows a nudibranch inside a crystal bubble algae. Photographer Captures A Rare Octopus With Transparent Head. The ocean hides an infinite universe that most probably will never be discovered in its entirety by mankind.

Photographer Captures A Rare Octopus With Transparent Head

Divers and photographers have long tried to capture the hidden gems of the ocean and came back with amazing shots many times. Blackwater photographers are diving into to deepest corners of the ocean and Taipei-based artist Wu Yung-sen has been doing the same thing for more than 4 years. When deep-diving recently, he encountered a very rare larval Wunderpus octopus and successfully captured it on his camera. The photo shows the transparent head of the octopus, encapsulating its red brain and leaves the viewer speechless. My Octopus Teacher review: The strange lives of cephalopods up close. By Elle Hunt My Octopus Teacher is available on Netflix from 7 September 2020 In many ways, the octopus is a tough proposition: a soft-bodied mollusc that carries the bulk of its brain in its arms, that can render itself solid without a skeleton or liquid despite its beak, that evolved separately from nearly every other organism on Earth.

My Octopus Teacher review: The strange lives of cephalopods up close

That otherness is at the heart of our fascination with octopuses: can we even aspire to understand something so foreign? A new Netflix documentary, My Octopus Teacher, follows one man’s attempt. Wanting to reconnect with nature after burning out with work, film-maker and naturalist Craig Foster starts freediving daily in the undersea kelp forests off Cape Town. Advertisement Foster collaborated on shooting the sequence with his friend, Blue Planet 2 cameraman Roger Horrocks. Why Do Octopuses Remind Us So Much of Ourselves? You’re sitting on the seabed, just off the coast of the Indonesian island of Lembeh.

Why Do Octopuses Remind Us So Much of Ourselves?

You’re not deep—20 feet or so—and there’s plenty of light. As you’d expect in such a tropical place, the water is warm. All around, you see ripples of a fine gray-black sand, covered, in places, with a kind of greenish scum. As you explore, you notice a conch shell. Stoutly made, it has six heavy spikes coming off it. Why Do Octopuses Remind Us So Much of Ourselves? Watch Day Octopus Change Color Rapidly While Sleeping. Any pet owner will tell you that their animal is a member of the family.

Watch Day Octopus Change Color Rapidly While Sleeping

This is true no matter what animal you care for, whether they're a dog, cat, horse, or pig. But most of us would be surprised to learn just how much marine biologist Dr. David Scheel's pet octopus (named Heidi) interacts with the family. Heidi is a day octopus and her life growing up with Dr. Scheel and his teenage daughter Laurel is the subject of an episode of PBS's series Nature. In Octopus: Making Contact, we follow the family as they bond with Heidi, who lives in an aquarium in Dr. The quick changes in camouflage are akin to the twitching paws we often see in our cats and dogs while they dream. “Octopuses followed a different evolutionary path, making them different from all other intelligent animals on this planet,” says Scheel. Octopus: Making Contact debuts at 8 pm on October 2, 2019, check your local listings. Heidi the day octopus changes color in quick succession while sleeping. Scientists give Molly to octopuses, and yeah, it works.

Get the Mach newsletter.

Scientists give Molly to octopuses, and yeah, it works

If you give an octopus some Molly, it'll probably ask for a cuddle. That's what a pair of scientists were hoping would happen, anyway, when they devised an experiment to test the effects of MDMA — also known as the psychoactive drug ecstasy or "Molly" — on octopuses. The goal of this peculiar study, published today (Sept. 20) in the journal Current Biology, wasn't just to see if octopuses could get high (spoiler: they sure can), but also to probe the evolutionary history of octopus behavior. Octopuses are known for being solitary, sometimes surly creatures, with one big exception — when it's time to mate. According to the new study authors, this behavioral shift suggests that octopuses may have some neural mechanism that suppresses antisocial behavior and amplifies sexual urges when love (or at least reproduction) is in the air. [8 Crazy Facts About Octopuses] Incidentally, similar shifts in sociability are seen in humans who have taken MDMA.