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L'arbre de vie

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Aux arbres. Victor HUGO (1802-1885) Arbres de la forêt, vous connaissez mon âme!

Aux arbres

Au gré des envieux, la foule loue et blâme ;Vous me connaissez, vous! L’Arbre de Vie. Elaguer l'arbre projet. Le principe: Un arbre dessiné représente le projet.

Elaguer l'arbre projet

Les plus grosses branches représentent les catégories les plus importantes du système/projet. Les feuilles les plus proches du coeur de l'arbre représente les éléments actuels. Les feuilles les plus à l'extérieur représentent les nouvelles éléments. L'extérieur de l'arbre représente le futur. Pourquoi ça marche Un des plus grands enjeux dans la mise en oeuvre d'un projet est de créer une image équilibrée de tout ce qui doit être faire pour réussir. En rappelant que tout projet doit grandir de manière planifiée mais organique et que la croissance est soutenu par une variété de mécanismes, Le jeu "Elaguer l'arbre-projet" permet aux contributeurs de donner une forme à tous les aspects du projet, au lieu de simplement avoir des retours sur quelques aspects sélectionnés. Vous et vos contributeurs savez que les aspects varient en importance.

Mise en oeuvre La première étape consiste à choisir un arbre et décider comment vous voulez le dessiner. L’utile et l’inutile : méditation de l’arbre. L'énergie de l'arbre et sa sagesse - Philippe Bray. The Secret Life of Trees: The Astonishing Science of What Trees Feel and How They Communicate. Trees dominate the world’s the oldest living organisms.

The Secret Life of Trees: The Astonishing Science of What Trees Feel and How They Communicate

Since the dawn of our species, they have been our silent companions, permeating our most enduring tales and never ceasing to inspire fantastical cosmogonies. Hermann Hesse called them “the most penetrating of preachers.” A forgotten seventeenth-century English gardener wrote of how they “speak to the mind, and tell us many things, and teach us many good lessons.” But trees might be among our lushest metaphors and sensemaking frameworks for knowledge precisely because the richness of what they say is more than metaphorical — they speak a sophisticated silent language, communicating complex information via smell, taste, and electrical impulses. This fascinating secret world of signals is what German forester Peter Wohlleben explores in The Hidden Life of Trees: What They Feel, How They Communicate (public library). But Wohlleben’s own career began at the opposite end of the caring spectrum.

Why are trees such social beings? The Book of Trees: 800 Years of Visualizing Science, Religion, and Knowledge in Symbolic Diagrams. By Maria Popova How the humble tree became our most powerful visual metaphor for organizing information and distilling our understanding of the world.

The Book of Trees: 800 Years of Visualizing Science, Religion, and Knowledge in Symbolic Diagrams

Why is it that when we behold the oldest living trees in the world, primeval awe runs down our spine? We are entwined with trees in an elemental embrace, both biological and symbolic, depending on them for the very air we breathe as well as for our deepest metaphors, millennia in the making. They permeate our mythology and our understanding of evolution. They enchant our greatest poets and rivet our greatest scientists. How and why this came to be is what designer and information visualization scholar Manuel Lima explores in The Book of Trees: Visualizing Branches of Knowledge (public library | IndieBound) — a magnificent 800-year history of the tree diagram, from Descartes to data visualization, medieval manuscripts to modern information design, and the follow-up to Lima’s excellent Visual Complexity: Mapping Patterns of Information.

Livres

Podcasts. Strange Trees: An Illustrated Atlas of the World’s Arboreal Wonders. Hermann Hesse called trees “the most penetrating of preachers.”

Strange Trees: An Illustrated Atlas of the World’s Arboreal Wonders

Three centuries earlier, a forgotten English gardener asserted that they “speak to the mind, and tell us many things, and teach us many good lessons.” Perhaps because trees are the oldest living things in the world, they have permeated our ancient mythology and our scientific sensemaking. More than a beautiful metaphor for life and death, trees have even saved our lives and, in inspired moments, we have saved theirs. Alongside each imaginative illustration, partway between botany and fairy tale, is a one-page autobiography of the respective tree, describing its natural and cultural habitat in a short first-person story fusing curious science facts, history, and local customs.

Don’t worry about getting bonked on the bean with a pod: cocoa trees don’t lose their seed pods, even when ripe. Illustrations courtesy of Princeton Architectural Press.