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Annie Ransley's brother, husband and son all went to World War One. Only one returned. Updated about 3 hours agoFri 24 Apr 2020, 10:59pm When the Great War begins for the British Empire in August 1914, Annie's brother Charles Leer is one of the first to enlist.

Annie Ransley's brother, husband and son all went to World War One. Only one returned

As a Boer War veteran, he can't wait to get back into battle. He leaves his job as a teacher at Watson's Bay Public School in Sydney and enlists, even though his wife Rosabella is gravely ill. Rosabella dies two weeks before Charles sets sail for the war, leaving their teenage daughter Zillah in the care of family friends in Parramatta. Charles lands on Gallipoli with the 3rd Battalion on April 25, 1915. His bravery and determination are mentioned in dispatches. In the days that follow, Private Aubrey Farmer and Company Quartermaster's Sergeant Sydney Dargin are sent out to retrieve Charles's body.

WWI diary returned to Tasmanian soldier's family 102 years after going missing. Updated about 2 hours agoTue 23 Apr 2019, 10:40pm From the muddy battlefields of France, to a home in Victoria, a tiny war diary has finally been returned home to Tasmania — 102 years after it was lost.

WWI diary returned to Tasmanian soldier's family 102 years after going missing

Key points: WWI soldier Oliver James Illingworth made it home to Launceston without his diaryIt is believed he lost his diary while fighting in the SommeThe diary has been returned to Mr Illingworth's family, with the help of social media The diary belonged to Tasmanian tailor and war veteran Oliver James Illingworth — or OJ Illingworth, as he was more commonly known — who served in the 40th infantry battalion in World War I. The wounded soldier made it home to Launceston — but his diary did not. It is believed Mr Illingworth lost the book while battling in the Somme region, near Albert, in France. "The last entry was on the 30th of September [in 1917]," his granddaughter Ann-Maree O'Keefe said.

He wrote in the diary daily until he lost it. Social media helps bring diary home. House renovation unearths images of Anzac soldiers not seen for more than 100 years. Updated about an hour agoSun 21 Apr 2019, 12:18am An exhibition of photographs of Anzac veterans, hidden from view for more than 100 years, will be revealed to the public in the NSW Hunter Valley on Anzac Day.

House renovation unearths images of Anzac soldiers not seen for more than 100 years

Key points: Hundreds of delicate glass plate negatives, depicting newly enlisted soldiers in 1916, were found in boxes underneath a homeA builder donated the entire collection to the Coalfields Heritage GroupThe Lost Diggers of Weston exhibition will run at the Kurri Kurri Anglican Hall from April 25 The Lost Diggers of Weston exhibition, at the Kurri Kurri Anglican Hall in the NSW Hunter Valley, was made using glass plate negatives produced by Scottish migrant photographer Alexander Galloway in 1916. Organisers have created 23 stories at 1000-words each to be displayed alongside some of the 60 images, drawn from painstaking research at the Edgeworth David Memorial Museum in Kurri Kurri.

Images discovered underneath a house Labour of love for history detectives. Photo found in second-hand shop reveals story of decorated soldier and athlete Fred Hallam. Updated about an hour agoSat 3 Nov 2018, 11:21pm A century-old photograph found in a second-hand shop has led to the discovery of a remarkable story about a decorated soldier who until now has never had his service recognised in his home state.

Photo found in second-hand shop reveals story of decorated soldier and athlete Fred Hallam

Fred Hallam was an Australian Imperial Force boxing champion who fought at Gallipoli and in France in WWI. He received a medal for bravery and went on to serve on the home front during World War II. The framed image that helped reveal Hallam's story was discovered by ABC Radio Hobart producer Paul McIntyre and depicted a group of athletes from Hobart. "There was just something about Fred which seemed to stand out," Mr McIntyre said. "Putting a name to the face was one thing, but then to learn of his achievement in the international boxing ring and on the field of battle was completely unexpected.

" The men were identified as the 1906 New Town Harriers, and a second photo in an athletics club's archives helped Mr McIntyre to identify Hallam. The Queensland town that lost a generation in World War I, bonded by tragedy 100 years on. Posted about an hour agoSat 3 Nov 2018, 11:07pm A tiny community in Queensland's Scenic Rim bears a largely unknown story of terrible sacrifice made 100 years ago, where almost every family paid a price.

The Queensland town that lost a generation in World War I, bonded by tragedy 100 years on

The town of Maroon suffered one of the greatest losses of any community in World War I, with 40 per cent of the men enlisted from the town never returning. After decades of generations not wanting to talk about the war, the district has now come to peace with its past. Gas Attack Clip.mov. History - World Wars: Australia in World War One. WWI Trench Warfare. In Their Own Words : ANZACs of the Western Front. Diary of a Gallipoli soldier. Boy Soldiers of WW1.

War diary chronicles WW1 soldier's life.