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Internet History Sourcebooks Project. Internet History Sourcebooks Project Paul Halsall, Editor Last Modified: Nov 4 2011 | linked pages may have been updated more recently The Internet History Sourcebooks Project is a collection of public domain and copy-permitted historical texts presented cleanly (without advertising or excessive layout) for educational use.

Internet History Sourcebooks Project

Update Information 2006: In 2006 the Internet History Sourcebooks Project is undergoing a major overhaul to remove bad links and add more documents. Internet History Sourcebooks. Full Text Sources Links to full texts of books available at this and other sites will be listed here.

Internet History Sourcebooks

The texts are also integrated within the overall structure of the Sourcebook. This listing is to aid compilers of web guides to online books, etc. Echo Exploring and Collecting History Online. LA AVENTURA DE LA HISTORIA. Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media. Libros de historia: Edad Antigua y Media Descargar. British Museum. Institute of Historical Research.

Famous Trials - UMKC School of Law - Prof. Douglas Linder. World History : HyperHistory. Curiosidades de las Ciencias, la Historia y del Hombre. Homepage. Institute and Museum of the History of Science - Florence, Italy. HISTORY. ¿De dónde proviene el árbol de cacao? Mesoamérica o Alto Amazonas. Teachinghistory.org. From Smithsonian Magazine. Proyecto Clío. Educahistoria.com. ARTEHISTORIA.

Biográfica.info. Buscador de biografías. This Day in History — History.com — What Happened Today in History. On this day in 1895, physicist Wilhelm Conrad Rontgen (1845-1923) becomes the first person to observe X-rays, a significant scientific advancement that would ultimately benefit a variety of fields, most of all medicine, by making the invisible visible.

This Day in History — History.com — What Happened Today in History

Rontgen's discovery occurred accidentally in his Wurzburg, Germany, lab, where he was testing whether cathode rays could pass through glass when he noticed a glow coming from a nearby chemically coated screen. He dubbed the rays that caused this glow X-rays because of their unknown nature. X-rays are electromagnetic energy waves that act similarly to light rays, but at wavelengths approximately 1,000 times shorter than those of light. Rontgen holed up in his lab and conducted a series of experiments to better understand his discovery. He learned that X-rays penetrate human flesh but not higher-density substances such as bone or lead and that they can be photographed. History.com — History Made Every Day — American & World History. History en Español.