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How to knit a Ruffle Scarf and fix a knot when knitting ruffle yarn. Quoting, Paraphrasing, and Summarizing. Summary: This handout is intended to help you become more comfortable with the uses of and distinctions among quotations, paraphrases, and summaries.

Quoting, Paraphrasing, and Summarizing

This handout compares and contrasts the three terms, gives some pointers, and includes a short excerpt that you can use to practice these skills. Contributors:Dana Lynn Driscoll, Allen BrizeeLast Edited: 2013-02-15 09:44:45 What are the differences among quoting, paraphrasing, and summarizing? These three ways of incorporating other writers' work into your own writing differ according to the closeness of your writing to the source writing. Quotations must be identical to the original, using a narrow segment of the source. Paraphrasing involves putting a passage from source material into your own words. Summarizing involves putting the main idea(s) into your own words, including only the main point(s). APA Formatting and Style Guide. Summary: APA (American Psychological Association) style is most commonly used to cite sources within the social sciences.

APA Formatting and Style Guide

This resource, revised according to the 6th edition, second printing of the APA manual, offers examples for the general format of APA research papers, in-text citations, endnotes/footnotes, and the reference page. For more information, please consult the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, (6th ed., 2nd printing). Contributors:Joshua M. Paiz, Elizabeth Angeli, Jodi Wagner, Elena Lawrick, Kristen Moore, Michael Anderson, Lars Soderlund, Allen Brizee, Russell KeckLast Edited: 2014-11-11 10:20:40 Reference citations in text are covered on pages 169-179 of the Publication Manual.

Note: APA style requires authors to use the past tense or present perfect tense when using signal phrases to describe earlier research, for example, Jones (1998) found or Jones (1998) has found... APA citation basics Short quotations Long quotations Summary or paraphrase. Avoiding Plagiarism. Summary: There are few intellectual offenses more serious than plagiarism in academic and professional contexts.

Avoiding Plagiarism

This resource offers advice on how to avoid plagiarism in your work. OWL. Contributors:Allen Brizee.Summary: This resource outlines the generally accepted structure for introductions, body paragraphs, and conclusions in an academic argument paper.

OWL

Keep in mind that this resource contains guidelines and not strict rules about organization. Your structure needs to be flexible enough to meet the requirements of your purpose and audience. The following sections outline the generally accepted structure for an academic argument paper. Keep in mind that these are guidelines and that your structure needs to be flexible enough to meet the requirements of your purpose and audience. You may also use the following Purdue OWL resources to help you with your argument paper: Introduction The introduction is the broad beginning of the paper that answers three important questions: What is this? You should answer these questions by doing the following: First, I will define key terms for my argument, and then I will provide some background of the situation. Thesis checklist Induction. Seven stages of writing assignments.

English Grammar Reference and Exercises. OWL: Verb Tenses. Summary: This handout explains and describes the sequence of verb tenses in English.

OWL: Verb Tenses

Contributors:Chris Berry, Allen Brizee, Elizabeth AngeliLast Edited: 2013-09-14 09:29:01 Strictly speaking, in English, only two tenses are marked in the verb alone, present (as in "he sings") and past (as in "he sang"). Other English language tenses, as many as thirty of them, are marked by other words called auxiliaries. Understanding the six basic tenses allows one to re-create much of the reality of time in their writing. Simple Present: They walk Present Perfect: They have walked Simple Past: They walked Past Perfect: They had walked Future: They will walk Future Perfect: They will have walked Problems in sequencing tenses usually occur with the perfect tenses, all of which are formed by adding an auxiliary or auxiliaries to the past participle, the third principal part. ring, rang, rung walk, walked, walked Present Perfect 1. 2. 1. 2. 1. 2.

Past Perfect 1. 2. The vegetables were raised before they were sold. OWL: Subject/Verb Agreement. Summary: Ever get "subject/verb agreement" as an error on a paper?

OWL: Subject/Verb Agreement

This handout will help you understand this common grammar problem. Contributors:Joshua M. Paiz, Chris Berry, Allen BrizeeLast Edited: 2014-04-01 10:34:43 This handout gives you several guidelines to help your subjects and verbs agree. OWL: Paraphrase Exercises. Summary: This resource discusses how to paraphrase correctly and accurately.

OWL: Paraphrase Exercises

Contributors:Purdue OWLLast Edited: 2016-06-30 09:41:14 Learn to borrow from a source without plagiarizing. For more information on paraphrasing, as well as other ways to integrate sources into your paper, see the Purdue OWL handout Quoting Paraphrasing, and Summarizing. For more information about writing research papers, see our resource on this subject. A paraphrase is... your own rendition of essential information and ideas expressed by someone else, presented in a new form.one legitimate way (when accompanied by accurate documentation) to borrow from a source.a more detailed restatement than a summary, which focuses concisely on a single main idea.

Paraphrasing is a valuable skill because... 6 Steps to Effective Paraphrasing Some examples to compare The original passage: Students frequently overuse direct quotation in taking notes, and as a result they overuse quotations in the final [research] paper. OWL: Creating a Thesis Statement.

Summary: This resource provides tips for creating a thesis statement and examples of different types of thesis statements.

OWL: Creating a Thesis Statement