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Quoting, Paraphrasing, and Summarizing

Quoting, Paraphrasing, and Summarizing
Summary: This handout is intended to help you become more comfortable with the uses of and distinctions among quotations, paraphrases, and summaries. This handout compares and contrasts the three terms, gives some pointers, and includes a short excerpt that you can use to practice these skills. Contributors:Dana Lynn Driscoll, Allen BrizeeLast Edited: 2013-02-15 09:44:45 What are the differences among quoting, paraphrasing, and summarizing? These three ways of incorporating other writers' work into your own writing differ according to the closeness of your writing to the source writing. Quotations must be identical to the original, using a narrow segment of the source. Paraphrasing involves putting a passage from source material into your own words. Summarizing involves putting the main idea(s) into your own words, including only the main point(s). Why use quotations, paraphrases, and summaries? Quotations, paraphrases, and summaries serve many purposes.

https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/563/1/

Related:  Language of opinion/argumentlaracristinawelter2Avoiding Plagiarismeducational toolsWriting Resources

Discover forum moderating tips pros use to build large forums! Once your discussion forum gains momentum and you've got a steady influx of visitors, maintaining a civil environment will become increasingly important. In this, our third in a series of "How To" articles focused on building bigger, more vibrant forums, we'll present ways to manage your community that will minimize negative behavior but still promote a lively, spontaneous atmosphere. Before you open the doors to invite guests and prospective members to explore your new forum, the rules of engagement should be somewhat established. We say somewhat because they'll probably change over time as others contribute to the management and growth of your community. Forum Rules

Avoiding Plagiarism Summary: There are few intellectual offenses more serious than plagiarism in academic and professional contexts. This resource offers advice on how to avoid plagiarism in your work. Contributors:Karl Stolley, Allen Brizee, Joshua M. APA Formatting and Style Guide Summary: APA (American Psychological Association) style is most commonly used to cite sources within the social sciences. This resource, revised according to the 6th edition, second printing of the APA manual, offers examples for the general format of APA research papers, in-text citations, endnotes/footnotes, and the reference page. For more information, please consult the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, (6th ed., 2nd printing).

OWL Contributors:Allen Brizee.Summary: This resource outlines the generally accepted structure for introductions, body paragraphs, and conclusions in an academic argument paper. Keep in mind that this resource contains guidelines and not strict rules about organization. Your structure needs to be flexible enough to meet the requirements of your purpose and audience. The following sections outline the generally accepted structure for an academic argument paper. Keep in mind that these are guidelines and that your structure needs to be flexible enough to meet the requirements of your purpose and audience.

APA Parenthetical Documentation In APA style, source material is cited using a system that emphasizes the author and date of publication in its in-text citations. These in-text citations—used when source material is quoted, paraphrased, or summarized—point to full bibliographic citations located in the reference page at the end of the document. Here are general guidelines for in-text citations that cover the use of authors' names, placement of in-text citations, and treatment of nonrecoverable and electronic sources. Use of Authors' Names Blog Code of Conduct Welcome to DRAGON ROUGE Blog, a place for information and discussion in the areas of creation, design and innovation. Before participating in our Blog, we ask that you consult the following moderating and good-conduct rules: Discussions via comments on this blog are open to all; they are moderated after submission. The moderators’ role is to ensure that contributors follow the basic rules of public expression. These rules apply to statements made by contributors, comments made on the sites or references indicated in the contributions, and to the visuals that may accompany these contributions.

Citing Yourself If you cite or quote your previous work, treat yourself as the author and your own previous course work as an unpublished paper, as shown in the APA publication manual. For example, if Marie Briggs wanted to cite a paper she wrote at Walden in 2012, her in-text citation might look like this: Briggs (2012) asserted that previous literature on the psychology of tightrope walkers was faulty in that it "presumed that risk-taking behaviors align neatly with certain personality traits or disorders" (p. 4). And in the reference list: Briggs, M. (2012). An analysis of personality theory. Personality test based on C. Jung and I. Briggs Myers type theory This free personality test is based on Carl Jung’s and Isabel Briggs Myers’ personality type theory.business users - use advanced version » Upon completion of the questionnaire, you will: Obtain your 4-letter type formula according to Carl Jung’s and Isabel Briggs Myers’ typology, along with the strengths of preferences and the description of your personality type Discover careers and occupations most suitable for your personality type along with examples of educational institutions where you can get a relevant degree or training Understand communication and learning styles of your type. See which famous personalities share your type Be able to use the results of this test as an input into the Jung Marriage Test™ and the Demo of the Marriage Test™, to assess your compatibility with your long-term romantic partner Instructions: When responding to the statements, please choose the response you agree with most.

OWL: Verb Tenses Summary: This handout explains and describes the sequence of verb tenses in English. Contributors:Chris Berry, Allen Brizee, Elizabeth AngeliLast Edited: 2013-09-14 09:29:01 Strictly speaking, in English, only two tenses are marked in the verb alone, present (as in "he sings") and past (as in "he sang"). Other English language tenses, as many as thirty of them, are marked by other words called auxiliaries. Understanding the six basic tenses allows one to re-create much of the reality of time in their writing.

Ultimate Guide to Harvard Referencing - Cite This For Me Harvard is a style of referencing, primarily used by university students, to cite information sources. Two types of citations are included: In-text citations are used when directly quoting or paraphrasing a source.

Debates - Internet Craze - Lesson Plan Debates for Esl Classes This lesson plan is based on the idea that having students support opinions that are not necessarily their own during debates can help improve students fluency. In this manner, students pragmatically focus on correct production skills in conversation rather than striving to "win" the argument. For more information on this approach please see the following feature: Teaching Conversational Skills: Tips and Strategies Of course, once students have become confident in their production skills, the can obviously argue the point they truly believe in. Aim: Improve conversational skills when supporting a point of view Activity: Debate concerning the current and future impact of the Internet on daily life

Home - Citing Your Sources - Research Guides at Southern New Hampshire University - Shapiro Library What exactly is plagiarism? Let's go to a source! As defined by Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 11th ed. to plagiarize is:

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