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Cartes et mapmondes

Cartes et mapmondes

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40 Maps They Didn’t Teach You In School By the time we graduate high school, we learn that they never taught us the most interesting things in there. Sure, you might be able to name the European countries or point New York on the map, but does that give a you real understanding of how the world functions? To fill this gap, we have gathered a great and informative selection of infographical maps that they should’ve shown us at school: every single one of these maps reveals different fun and interesting facts, which can actually help you draw some pretty interesting conclusions. More than 44,000 people came together to set the Guinness World Record for reforestation. A group in Ecuador set a world record over the weekend by planting nearly 650,000 trees in a single day. Agence France-Presse reports that on May 16, 2015, nearly 45,000 people took part in the largest single-day reforestation project ever. In total, 647,250 trees (and more than 220 species of plants) were planted on roughly 5,000 acres of land, marking a new Guinness World Record. Woo! Volunteers begin reforesting an area near Catequilla, Ecuador. Photo by Rodrigo Buendia/AFP/Getty Images.

Organic eggs are so expensive because the chickens eat fancy imported food There are lots of reasons to pony up a few extra dollars for organic eggs — they have those rich, deep yellow yolks, for instance, and you get the satisfaction of knowing the chickens who laid them lived better lives than the chickens who laid the sad non-organic eggs. But man, they are spendy. One reason, Dan Charles reports at NPR, that organic eggs are expensive is that the chickens eat fancy imported food. American farmers aren’t growing enough organic feed to feed the chickens that produce organic eggs:

Kids science: Electricity 102 Science >> Physics for Kids Important things to know about electricity? Conductors and insulators - Conductors are materials that allow electricity to flow easily. Most types of metal are good conductors, which is why we use metal for electrical wire. Copper is a good conductor and isn't too expensive, so it's used a lot for the wiring in homes today. THE COUNT-UP TO 2052: AN OVERARCHING FRAMEWORK FOR ACTION. After the publication of the Korean, Chinese and Japanese language editions of “2052 – A Global Forecast for the Next Forty Years”, the author, Club of Rome Member Jorgen Randers, gave talks in China, Korea and Japan in June 2013. There was an overwhelming media response in Asia. Inter alia, Jorgen Randers appeared on the Japanese Television program “Prime News 21″ (Fuji Television) on June 12th, 2013.

This Map of the World Just Won Japan’s Prestigious Design Award The 2016 Good Design Award results were announced recently with awards going to over 1000 entries in several different categories. But the coveted Grand Award of Japan’s most well-known design award, given to just 1 entry, was announced today. Last year the winner was a personal mobility chair and the year before that it was a robotic arm. This year, the grand prize went to a world map.

Setting a country alight: Indonesia's devastating forest fires are manmade We are witnessing the worst manmade environmental disaster since the BP gulf oil spill. Huge, out-of-control fires rage through the forests of Indonesia – and the source of many is the practice of deliberately burning the land to clear it for palm oil and paper products. Thousands of fires have been lit to clear land simply because it is 75% cheaper than other methods. By burning down forests companies can get access to the land and can commence industrial pulp and palm oil plantations. The blazes are occurring in the peatland forests of Kalimantan and Sumatra, which is a unique wetland ecosystem home to threatened species.

Ask Umbra: Should I buy local or organic? Send your question to Umbra! Q. Dear Umbra, We have a bountiful selection of summer fruits and vegetables at lots of local farmers markets. The Fine Art of Electronics {under construction} This tutorial shows you how to make a paper battery holder for coin cell batteries (CR2032 and CR2016). Scroll to the bottom of this page for the video tutorial. Materials and Tools battery holder template printed on cardstock (download PDF here) conductive copper tape (available at digikey and sparkfun)regular tape (e.g. scotch tape or masking tape)scissorssurface mount LEDs (White, Green, Blue, Red, Yellow)3V coin cell battery (CR2032 or the thinner CR2016) Steps

Is Humanity Pushing Earth Past a Tipping Point? Could human activity push Earth’s biological systems to a planet-wide tipping point, causing changes as radical as the Ice Age’s end — but with less pleasant results, and with billions of people along for a bumpy ride? It’s by no means a settled scientific proposition, but many researchers say it’s worth considering — and not just as an apocalyptic warning or far-fetched speculation, but as a legitimate question raised by emerging science. “There are some biological realities we can’t ignore,” said paleoecologist Anthony Barnosky of the University of California, Berkeley. “What I’d like to avoid is getting caught by surprise.”

Earth - Explore satellite and aerial images of the Earth Zoom Earth shows new NASA satellite images every day. Explore satellite and aerial imagery of the Earth in a simple, zoomable interface. Zoom into near-live satellite images from NASA and Bing Maps. Previously known as Flash Earth. The Eco-Apocalypse in Indonesia That No One is Talking About Alex Pietrowski, StaffWaking Times Some of the most devastating fires the world has ever seen are happening right now in Indonesia, and this unfolding disaster is getting little attention. Annual fires during the dry season have become typical in the last 20 years or so as slash and burn rainforest farming techniques have ravaged this once pristine part of the world, but now this year they are catastrophic. Some 5000 fires have burned in Borneo alone in just the last 2 months.

Organic farming sucks (up carbon) We’ve known for a while now that organic agriculture is good for the climate: It does a better job at grabbing carbon from the air and turning it into soil than industrial agriculture, which often does just the opposite. Last year, researchers reexamined all 74 studies that had looked at organic farming and carbon capture. After crunching the numbers from the results of these studies they concluded that, lo and behold, organic farms are carbon sponges. This makes some intuitive sense: It’s generally the organic farmers who are most concerned with building up the soil — they can’t rely on synthetic supplements if the soil chemistry runs low, after all.

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