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Talk about yourself

Talk about yourself
Examiner: Hi. What’s your name? Kelvin: My name is Kelvin. Examiner: Kelvin, OK. So, Kelvin, I’m going to ask you a few questions. I’d like to ask you about your school. Kelvin: I think I like economics most because I can study different kinds of demand and supply theory and I can use it in my daily life to observe the market. Examiner: OK. Kelvin: Actually, I don’t like physics too much because I need to calculate many difficult questions and all those mathematics words. Examiner: I see. Kelvin: Yeah, sure. Examiner: OK, and what would you like to study there? Kelvin: I think I would like to study something about business. Examiner: OK, that’s great. Melissa: My name is Melissa. Examiner: Melissa? Melissa: Yeah. Examiner: Hi, Melissa. Melissa: I’ve got no sisters and brothers. Examiner: And your dog? Melissa: Yeah! Examiner: Great. Melissa: I like mathematics the most because I think it’s satisfying to calculate the solution. Examiner: OK. Examiner: Great, OK. Examiner: Sure, OK.

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How in questions -ENGAMES The word “HOW” is one of the most productive words in English. It helps us create meaningful questions and sentences. The word “HOW” combines with many other words to create these questions. In this post I try to introduce the basic phrases “How much”, “How many”, “How often”, “How well”, “How long”, “How far” and “How old”. How in questions – mindmap Here the students can practise the basic usage of the word HOW in questions. Discussion Social networking can be too dangerous for young people and should only be available to adults. Examiner: So, now we’re going to have a short discussion. You’ve got one minute to take notes and prepare together for a two-minute discussion. Remember to listen, take turns and explain your opinions.

Behind the News Weekdays: 02/06/2017 watch BTN Investigates Have you seen or heard something in the news you'd like explained?Add Question Welcome Book Gallery Over 12,000 kids have sent in their message to refugees.View 45 ways to avoid using the word 'very' Three Telling Quotes About ‘Very’ Substitute ‘damn’ every time you’re inclined to write ‘very;’ your editor will delete it and the writing will be just as it should be. ~Mark Twain‘Very’ is the most useless word in the English language and can always come out. More than useless, it is treacherous because it invariably weakens what it is intended to strengthen. ~Florence KingSo avoid using the word ‘very’ because it’s lazy. A man is not very tired, he is exhausted. Describe a photo or picture Examiner: OK. You each have a picture. You’ve got one minute to look at your picture. Describe all that you can see in the picture and explain what you think is happening. Melissa: In the picture there is a man lying in the middle of the road and there is a car and a motorbike there.

12 Simple Tips for Improving Your Spoken English Without a Speaking Partner So, you’re all by yourself. Forever alone. Okay, maybe you’re not forever alone, but right now you need to practice English alone. How can you practice speaking English without anybody else to help you? Writing, reading, listening—these skills can all be practiced alone. Easy.

20 Teen and Tween Conversation Starters How was your day? Fine. How was school? Good. The Best Tools For Creating Fake “Stuff” For Learning The fake “stuff” I’m referring to in the headline includes newspaper articles, sports “trading cards,” iPhone conversations, Facebook pages etc. These can be used for conversation practice, to create reports on historical figures (or on natural disasters or on just about anything) and for numerous other learning activities. Here are my choices for The Best Tools For Creating Fake “Stuff” For Learning:

a to szkoła podstawowa czy też gimnazjum by aleksandraboratynska Nov 14

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