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Interesting English Lessons

Interesting English Lessons
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The best place online to learn English for free List of Interactive Quizzes The quizzes with a magenta marble are also listed within the section or digital handout to which they apply. The twenty-one quizzes with a green marble and designated "Practice" have been adapted from the instructor's manual and other ancillary materials accompanying Sentence Sense: A Writer's Guide. They are duplicated here with permission of the author, Evelyn Farbman, and the publisher, Houghton Mifflin Inc. The seventeen quizzes with a gold marble were written by the English faculty at an estimable midwestern university and are used here with the permission of that department. The ten quizzes with a red marble were prepared by students in Professor Karyn Hollis's Tutor Training course at Villanova University. Clicking on the NUMBER immediately before the quiz's name will take you to the section of the Guide pertaining to the grammatical issue(s) addressed in that quiz. Clicking on the Guide's logo at the top of a quiz-page will bring you back to this page.

Wonderful World | allatc MAIN ACTIVITIES Listening, discussion, vocabulary of animals and geographical features. SUITABLE FOR Teens and adults, Intermediate (B1) and above TEACHER’S NOTES (Click here for a pdf of the Teacher’s Notes.) Display this word cloud or make your own at Tell students that it contains the lyrics of a well-known song. Display the second word cloud, which contains the song title. Tell them to draw a grid four squares by four squares. Play the video – sound only, with the screen blank. Display or hand out a copy of the lyrics so that students can see where their words appear in the song and check new vocabulary if necessary. Put students in pairs and assign each pair two lines of the song. Give them a few minutes to come up with some ideas and then ask each pair to tell the rest of the class what images they agreed on. Now play the video so that students can compare their images with the ones used in the video. Like this: Like Loading...

How Much Is It: A Shopping Lesson Plan by Chris Gunn Time: Up to 4 hours depending on how much the teacher wishes to use. Materials: To give to the students. Introductory Vocabulary Exercises. Information Gap Conversation and Class Survey Comparative Grammar Practice and Shopping Role-play 5 Pages of Vocabulary and Expressions Worksheets Materials: For the teacher. Product Information Sheets Part 1: Introduction to the Unit Vocabulary If time permits, write the unit vocabulary expressions on the board before the class begins. Look at the groupings of words and ask students to come up with a heading for each group. Next, go over the part of the bill talking about discounts, tax, and tips. Finally, go over cheap, expensive, and reasonable. Part 2: Information Gap This part is pretty much self-explanatory. Note: the 'Conversation Strategy' for this unit is confirming. Part 3: Class Survey and Social Strategy In this section, students can practice complimenting each other. Complimenting properly is a form of pragmatic competence.

Super Teacher Worksheets STW Filing Cabinet Logged in members can use the Super Teacher Worksheets filing cabinet to save their favorite worksheets. Quickly access your most commonly used files AND your custom generated worksheets! Please login to your account or become a member today to utilize this helpful new feature. :) [x] close This document has been saved in your Super Teacher Worksheets filing cabinet. Here you can quickly access all of your favorite worksheets and custom generated files in one place! Click on My Filing Cabinet in the menu at the upper left to access it anytime! Grade Level Estimation Title: Grade Level Estimation: 1st2nd3rd4th5th Grade level may vary depending on location and school curriculum. Common Core Standards Common core standards listing. All common core standards details. If you think there should be a change in the common core standards listed for this worksheet - please let us know. [x] close Finding Simple MachinesFree Simple Machines: Multiple Choice Simple Machines: Crossword Puzzle

Idioms used by native speakers Those of us who grew up with English as our first language have been exposed to idioms and idiomatic expressions for most of our lives. They may have confused us a little when we were children, but explanation and constant exposure not only increased our understanding of them, but likely drew them into our own vernacular. If you’re in the process of learning the English language, you may come across some of these and not be entirely sure what they mean. 1. No, this doesn’t mean that you’ve dropped part of your snack. 2. Like taking a HUGE bite of a sandwich that will fill your mouth up so much that you can’t move your jaw, this idiom implies that you’ve taken on more than you can handle successfully. 3. You can’t take anything with you when you die, so don’t bother hoarding your stuff or not using it except for “special occasions”. 4. This implies that nearly everything has been packed/taken/removed. 5. 6. To get married. 7. 8. This means “never”. 9. Basically: you are who you are.

The ESL Commando Lesson Plans Home › Classroom Resources › Lesson Plans We have hundreds of standards-based lesson plans written and reviewed by educators using current research and the best instructional practices. Find the perfect one for your classroom. Standard Lessons See All Standard Lessons These lessons are designed to offer three to five classroom sessions with step-by-step instructions. Grades 5 – 12 | Lesson Plan Thoughtful Threads: Sparking Rich Online Discussions Today's students love chatting online with friends. Standards Every lesson plan on ReadWriteThink has been aligned not only to the IRA/NCTE Standards for the English Language Arts but to individual state standards as well. Idioms – as clear as mud? Miranda Steel is a freelance ELT lexicographer and editor. She has worked as a Senior Editor for dictionaries for learners at OUP and has also worked for COBUILD. In this post, she looks at some of the weird and wonderful idioms in the English language. Idioms are commonly used in spoken and written English. Native English speakers are usually confident that their readers or listeners will recognize the idiom, so well-known phrases rarely need to be given in full. Some idioms can be shortened in other ways such as long story short (to cut a long story short). “Anyway, long story short, it turns out Drake isn’t really his father.” Sometimes only a fragment of the original idiom remains. Another common way of changing an idiom is to reverse its meaning. Many idioms are very versatile and can be changed in a variety of ways. “Why use a stick when a carrot will work better?” “Their approach is all stick and no carrot.” “They are using every carrot and stick at their disposal.” Like this:

abcteach -- Free Printables, Interactives, Custom Documents, Clip Art, and Games Free ESL Worksheets, English Teaching Materials, ESL Lesson Plans What do idioms look like? Ahead of his talk at IATEFL 2011 entitled ‘Don’t give up on idioms and phrasal verbs’, Stuart Redman, co-author of Oxford Word Skills, ‘gets to the bottom of‘ idioms in the English language. What’s the first thing that comes into your mind when you see these expressions? - kick the bucket – be barking up the wrong tree – a storm in a teacup – strike while the iron is hot – have egg on your face Your answer is probably that they are all idioms: groups of words that not only have a meaning that is different from the individual words, but also a meaning that is often difficult or impossible to guess from the individual words. Now, let’s turn to another list of expressions. - to some extent – I’ve no idea – from time to time – first of all – in the distance Less obvious perhaps, but the answer, in fact, is the same: they are all idioms. The common factor with both of the above lists is that the form of the expressions have become fixed, or frozen. Do all idioms have a fixed form like this? Like this:

Printouts Home › Classroom Resources › Printouts Go offline with this collection of our best printable sheets from assessments to organizers—all of them classroom-tested and easy to use. Graphic Organizers See All These printouts help students brainstorm, analyze, and organize their ideas. Grades 3 – 8 | Printout K-W-L Chart This K-W-L Chart, which tracks what a student knows (K), wants to know (W), and has learned (L) about a topic, can be used before, during, and after research projects. Writing Starters See All Help jumpstart students writing with these printouts. Diamante Poem This tool will allow your students to create a diamante poem by reflecting on their knowledge of a topic and by using nouns, verbs, and adjectives in a creative manner. Assessment Tools See All Whether you need a rubric or a self-assessment sheet, you can find it here. Informational Sheets See All These helpful printouts provide information on topics ranging from podcasts to presentations, and more. more K-W-L Creator Diamante Poems

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