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ORBIS

ORBIS

https://orbis.stanford.edu/

Related:  mapsCultura classica - ClassicsHistorical GISAncient RomeInteresting

Periodis Web - Maps to be Used for the History of Europe Euratlas Periodis Web shows the history of Europe through a sequence of 21 historical maps, every map depicting the political situation at the end of each century. Here, on the left, are 21 mini-maps giving access to 21 full maps and to 84 quarters of maps with more detailed views of the states, provinces and main cities.Moreover, each map offers a historical gazetteer. Thus you can highlight in red each sovereign state and in green each dependent entity. See the Map Legend for more details. Navigation through the atlas is easy: on the left side of the pages, you simply need to choose a century for temporal navigation. French and German versions of this historical atlas are also provided and you can view them by clicking on the small flags at the top of the pages.

Play Caesar: Travel Ancient Rome with Stanford's Interactive Map Scholars of ancient history and IT experts at Stanford University have collaborated to create a novel way to study Ancient Rome. ORBIS, a geospatial network model, allows visitors to experience the strategy behind travel in antiquity. (Find a handy tutorial for using the system on the Web and YouTube). The ORBIS map includes about 750 mostly urban settlements of the Roman period. What Historians Want from GIS By J. B. "Jack" Owens The Extent of the Roman Empire Time has seen the rise and fall of a number of great empires - the Babylonian, the Assyrian, the Egyptian, and lastly, the Persian. Regardless of the size or skill of their army or the capabilities of their leaders, all of these empires fell into ruin. History has demonstrated that one of the many reasons for this ultimate decline was the empire’s vast size - they simply grew too large to manage, falling susceptible to external, as well as internal, forces.

Retrotechtacular: Examining Music in 1950’s Russia If you had told 12-year-old me that one day I would be able to listen to pretty much any song I wanted to on demand and also pull up the lyrics as fast as I could type the artist’s name and part of the title into a text box, I would have a) really hoped you weren’t kidding and b) would have wanted to grow up even faster than I already did. The availability of music today, especially in any place with first world Internet access is really kind of astounding. While the technology to make this possible has come about only recently, the freedom of music listening has been fairly wide open in the US. The closest we’ve come to governmental censorship is the parental advisory sticker, and those are just warnings. The only thing that really stands between kids’ ears and the music they want to listen to is parental awareness and/or consent.

Infographics - Own your Information I am a Visual Arts teacher, just so you might start to understand my next comment. I love good Infographics ! I can not think of another technique that condenses the essence of a message down into a more accessible and easily understood medium.

An Interactive Map of Odysseus' 10-Year Journey in Homer's Odyssey The Odyssey, one of Homer’s two great epics, narrates Odysseus’ long, strange trip home after the Trojan war. During their ten-year journey, Odysseus and his men had to overcome divine and natural forces, from battering storms and winds to difficult encounters with the Cyclops Polyphemus, the cannibalistic Laestrygones, the witch-goddess Circe and the rest. And they took a most circuitous route, bouncing all over the Mediterranean, moving first down to Crete and Tunisia. Next over to Sicily, then off toward Spain, and back to Greece again. If you’re looking for an easy way to visualize all of the twists and turns in The Odyssey, then we’d recommend spending some time with the interactive map created by Gisèle Mounzer. “Odysseus’ Journey” breaks down Odysseus’ voyage into 14 key scenes and locates them on a modern map designed by Esri, a company that creates GIS mapping software.

Great Britain Historical Geographical Information System (GBHGIS) The Great Britain Historical Geographical Information System is a unique digital collection of information about Britain's localities as they have changed over time. Information comes from census reports, historical gazetteers, travellers' tales and historic maps assembled into a whole that is much more than the sum of its parts. This site tells you more about the project itself and about historical GIS. How 3rd century Chinese saw the Romans A country of “numerous minor kings” where fierce tigers and lions kill travelers. That doesn’t sound like your average description of Rome, does it? The borders of the Roman Empire and Han China around 100 AD.

Architectures As mentioned a while back, I’ve been trying to find a way to classify the numerous ‘Design with Intent’ and architectures of control examples that have been examined on this site, and suggested by readers. Since that post, my approach has shifted slightly to look at what the intent is behind each example, and hence develop a kind of ‘method’ for suggesting ‘solutions’ to ‘problems’, based on analysing hundreds of examples. I’d hesitate to call it a suggestion algorithm quite yet, but it does, in a very very rudimentary way, borrow certain ideas from TRIZ*. Below is a tentative, v.0.1 example of the kind of thought process that a ‘designer’ might be led through by using the DwI Method. I’ve deliberately chosen an common example where the usual architectures of control-type ‘solutions’ are pretty objectionable.

Google Maps Launch Google MapsLaunch Maps in LUNA Browser The over 120 historical maps in the Google Maps have been selected by David Rumsey from his collection of more than 150,000 historical maps; in addition, there are a few maps from collections with which he collaborates. These maps can also be seen in the Gallery layer of Google Earth, Rumsey Historical Maps layer, and in the Google Earth viewers on this website. All the maps contain rich information about the past and represent a sampling of time periods (1680 to 1930), scales, and cartographic art, resulting in visual history stories that only old maps can tell. Each map has been georeferenced, thus creating unique digital map images that allow the old maps to appear in their correct places on the modern globe.

"Rome in 3D" reboot - detailed reconstruction of the City center - History in 3D After a relatively long pause, we’re returning to the “Rome in 3D” project. During the last months, as we all know, not everything went as we initially planned. But we did not abandon the project despite the difficulties. Today, I want to share a first intro to the Rome project in a new form. To a certain degree, it is the reboot of the project, since many objects were replaced and remodelled completely, and the whole project has been moved to the new game engine.

Historical GIS The AAG Historical GIS Forum provides a digital exchange center for historians, geographers, and other humanities scholars to network with each other and discuss pressing research needs and topics, such as: Challenges facing historical GIS work Best practices in GIS-based historical research Key technical issues and how to resolve them Data consistency and comparability issues Theoretical and conceptual issues in approaches to incorporating geographical data into historical research projects AAG members and non-members alike are encouraged to participate in the Forum.

Related:  History...ResearchHissalinkkejäSe cultiver