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Art of Memorizing

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Yes, You Too Can Read at 1000 Words Per Minute - Testing Circus. Ever wondered how to read faster. Here is a solution that will allow you to read 1000 words per minute. Spritz, a Boston based start-up, is developing a technology that would enable you to read up to 1000 words per minutes. Spritz’s mission is to change the way people read and make communication faster, easier, and more effective.

With Spritz, which is coming to the Samsung Galaxy S5 and Samsung Gear 2 watch, words appear one at a time in rapid succession. This allows you to read at speeds of between 250 and 1,000 words per minute. The typical college-level reader reads at a pace of between 200 and 400 a minute. What Spritz does is manipulate the format of the words to more appropriately line them up with the eye’s natural motion of reading.

Try it for yourself. You just read 250 words per minute. This is 250 words per minute. What about 350 words per minute? 350 words per minute doesn’t seem that much faster. 3 hours and 40 minutes to finish Potter. Wow! Now it’s getting harder to follow. How to Learn Without Memorizing. Photo by Edwin Stemp Rote memorization is an inefficient way to learn. Just retaining a single formula can mean pounding the same information into your skull dozens of times. If your computer hard drive had this accuracy, you’d probably throw it out.

Unfortunately, you’re stuck with your brain. The good news is that you don’t need to learn by memorization. The vast majority of information is better stored in your head using a completely different system – learning through connecting ideas together. A few years ago, I noticed that smart people seemed to learn differently than most other people. While there are undoubtedly some genetic advantages that allow some people to learn effortlessly, I think part of this difference in success comes down to strategy. Is Your Brain a File Drawer or a Web of Ideas?

A computer stores information as thousands of electrical 1s and 0s in a linear fashion. However, your brain isn’t a sequence of bits and bytes, so this approach doesn’t make sense. 1. 2. 3. Home Page. This wiki is a collaborative environment for exploring ways to become a better thinker. Topics that can be explored here include MemoryTechniques, MentalMath, CriticalThinking, BrainStorming, ShorthandSystems, NotebookSystems, and SmartDrugs.

Other relevant topics are also welcome. SiteNews Wiki Topics Mindhacker: The support page for the 2011 book by RonHaleEvans and MartyHaleEvans. MindPerformanceHacks: The support page for the 2006 book of the same name by RonHaleEvans. Easily memorize complex information - MemoryTechnique Do hard math in your head - MentalMath Improve your intelligence Think better Other pages What is a Wiki? A wiki is a web site built collaboratively by a community of users. Feel free to add your own content to this wiki. The Mentat Wiki is powered by Oddmuse, and hosted by the Center for Ludic Synergy. How To Learn Without Memorizing. How To Memorize Things Quickly. People like to joke that the only thing you really “learn” in school is how to memorize.

As it turns out, that’s not even the case for most of us. If you go around the room and ask a handful of people how to memorize things quickly, most of them will probably tell you repetition. That is so far from the truth, it’s running for office. If you want to memorize something quickly and thoroughly, repetition won’t cut it; however, recalling something will. The problem is that recalling something requires learning, and we all learn in different ways. Below are some universal steps to mastering the art of recalling so that you can start memorizing a ton of data in a short amount of time. Before we start, you need to establish something: are you an auditory, visual, or experiential learner? Step 1: Preparation To optimize your memorization session, pay close attention to which environment you choose. Next, start drinking some tea. Step 2: Record What You’re Memorizing Step 3: Write Everything Down.

Using Pattern Recognition to Enhance Memory and Creativity - Maria Popova. "If seven friends in turn rapidly told him their phone numbers, he could calmly wait until the last digit was spoken and then, from memory, key all seven friends' numbers into his phone's contact list without error.

" It seems to be the season for fascinating meditations on consciousness, exploring such questions as what happens while we sleep, how complex cognition evolved, and why the world exists. Joining them and prior explorations of what it means to be human is The Ravenous Brain: How the New Science of Consciousness Explains Our Insatiable Search for Meaning (public library) by Cambridge neuroscientist Daniel Bor in which, among other things, he sheds light on how our species' penchant for pattern-recognition is essential to consciousness and our entire experience of life. To illustrate the power of chunking, Bor gives an astounding example of how one man was able to use this mental mechanism in greatly expanding the capacity of his working memory. Memorizing Dates - How To Remember Dates For A Test. Dates are often difficult to remember because they seem so random and obscure unless we can relate them to something specific.

For instance, the American Civil War started in 1861, but unless you have a strong interest in the specific timeline of the war, there is nothing special about the starting date that separates that date from any other. What makes 1861 stand apart from 1863 or 1851? When trying to memorize a date, students can really benefit from a mnemonic system (memory technique) to help them recall the right numbers in the right order. For memorizing dates it might be helpful to borrow a practice from the London Cockneys.

A Cockney is an inhabitant of the East End of London, England. In Cockney slang: Can you believe it? More examples: Whistle and flute = suit White mice = ice Tom Hanks = thanks Trouble and strife = wife Remembering Dates We can use the same method to remember dates. You can leave off the century, so that 1861, the starting date for the Civil War, becomes 61. Pinyin / Ting - The Chinese Experience. Improve Your Memory with The Chunking Technique. Pi Memorisation. This section will help you memorize Pi. Pi is defined, in Euclidean geometry, as a constant which is the ratio of a circle's circumference to its diameter. Why Pi? Pi is a challenge to memorize because the number of digits in it are infinite, and there's no discernable pattern anywhere to the order of the digits.

There are many other constants with these qualities (most notably e, the base of natural logarithms, and the square root of 2), but since Pi is usually introduced in geometry before other similar numbers, Pi is the most recognizable of these numbers. Together, all these qualities help make Pi a classic challenge, and allow you to determine to what degree you wish to meet the challenge. It's like climbing a customizable mountain. What are the Digits of Pi? There are several sources for the digits of Pi. How Many Digits Should I Memorize? This will largely be determined by your interest in the topic, and to what use you will put your knowledge of Pi.

Up to 31 Digits Up to 100 Digits. Art of memory. The art of memory (Latin: ars memoriae) is any of a number of a loosely associated mnemonic principles and techniques used to organize memory impressions, improve recall, and assist in the combination and 'invention' of ideas. An alternative and frequently used term is "Ars Memorativa" which is also often translated as "art of memory" although its more literal meaning is "Memorative Art".

It is sometimes referred to as mnemotechnics.[1] It is an 'art' in the Aristotelian sense, which is to say a method or set of prescriptions that adds order and discipline to the pragmatic, natural activities of human beings.[2] It has existed as a recognized group of principles and techniques since at least as early as the middle of the first millennium BCE,[3] and was usually associated with training in rhetoric or logic, but variants of the art were employed in other contexts, particularly the religious and the magical.

Origins and history[edit] One of Giordano Bruno's simpler pieces Principles[edit] I need to go to my mind palace. Have you deleted anything from your.mind palace yet? I've just began creating/using mine so i began with small things that are unimportant. i think i can't delete them yet because i don't have.a lot of info yet. any suggestions? Deleting things can be somewhat difficult! It’s a lot easier to create an idea than it is to destroy one, especially if it’s one so interesting that it’s hard to forget about. I have a room filled with things that are either semi-permanent or temporary, the to-do list room. Some are reoccurring items, ( reminders to study and such ) but a lot are things that get checked off once and then deleted.

The way I delete those items is by imagining a little trash bin popping up, like the recycling bin on your computer, then putting the trigger ( no matter how big it is, it will fit somehow ) into the trash can, then pushing the trash can out of my view and back into the void whence it came. That pretty much takes care of it. Experiment and see what works best for you! Pimp Your Memory: How to Build a Mind Palace like Sherlock Holmes | davinia hamilton.

You’ve all seen that scene in the Baskerville episode of BBC’s Sherlock (if you haven’t, you’re missing out, mate) where the show is about to reach its climax and Sherlock, in that flat, bitchy tone we’ve all come to love, commands: “Get out. I need to go to my Mind Palace.” John Watson explains it’s a memory technique which, in theory, means you’ll never forget a thing, and then we see Sherlock (with the aid of a visual manifestation of his mind, including a particularly funny moment when Elvis Presley’s face is superimposed on his) link together all the clues they’ve been given to solve the mystery of HOUND. Despite what a lot of viewers thought, the Mind Palace was not just a clever plot device invented by Mark Gatiss just for the show. And I’ve found it to be a ridiculously helpful mind hack. Next, you’ll need to define a specific route through the palace. Now, you can place items which need remembering along your route.

So there you go. Develop Perfect Memory With the Memory Palace Technique. The Memory Palace is one of the most powerful memory techniques I know. It’s not only effective, but also fun to use — and not hard to learn at all. The Memory Palace has been used since ancient Rome, and is responsible for some quite incredible memory feats. Eight-time world memory champion Dominic O’Brien, for instance, was able to memorize 54 decks of cards in sequence (that’s 2808 cards), viewing each card only once. And there are countless other similar achievements attributed to people using the Memory Palace technique or variations of it.

Even in fiction, there are several references to the technique. In Thomas Harris’ novel Hannibal, for example, serial killer Hannibal Lecter uses Memory Palaces to store amazingly vivid memories of years of intricate patient records (sadly, it was left off the movie). Of course, most of us are not in Dominic’s memory championship line of business (or in Hannibal’s line of business for that matter). The Memory Palace 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Final Thoughts.

Banned Library | How to Remember Stuff with a Memory Palace. The Method of Loci" The oldest known mnemonic strategy is called the method of loci ("loci" is the plural of locus, which means location, or place). It's based on the assumption that you can best remember places that you are familiar with, so if you can link something you need to remember with a place that you know very well, the location will serve as a clue that will help you to remember. Devised during the days of the Roman Empire, the method of loci is really a sort of linking method with a twist. According to Cicero, this method was developed by the poet Simonides of Ceos, who was the only survivor of a building collapse during a dinner he attended. Simonides was able to identify the dead, who were crushed beyond recognition, by remembering where the guests had been sitting. From this experience, he realized that it would be possible to remember anything by associating it with a mental image of a location.

This method works especially well if you're good at visualizing. LOCI Method of mnemonic memory technique. Loci technique for mnemonic memory technique This loci technique was used by ancient orators to remember speeches, and it combines the use of organization, visual memory, and association. Before using the technique, you must identify a common path that you walk.

This can be the walk from your dorm to class, a walk around your house, whatever is familiar. What is essential is that you have a vivid visual memory of the path and objects along it. Once you have determined your path and visualized the landmarks, you are ready to use the path to remember your material. You do not have to limit this to a path. Method of loci If someone reads a list of unrelated words to you, just once, how many do you think you could remember? Now take a few minutes to identify a path or object that you can use in the method of loci. Practice the loci mnemonic technique to sharpen your skills. Exercise for mnemonic memory Articles about mnemonic memory. Your Memory Palace: Method of Loci. Memory Enhancing Technique The method of loci, also called the memory palace, is a mnemonic device introduced in ancient Roman rhetorical treatises. It relies on memorized spatial (of or relating to facility in perceiving relation of objects) relationships to establish, order and recollect memorial content.

The term is most often found in specialized works on psychology, neurobiology, and memory, though it was used in the same general way at least as early as the first half of the nineteenth century in works on rhetoric, logic, and philosophy. Method of loci is also commonly called the mental walk. In simple terms, it is a method of memory enrichment which uses visualization to organize and recall information. To use the method of loci bring to mind a familiar building, such as your house.

Along your route create a list of "loci”:i.e. well defined parts of the room that you can use later to memorize things. Don’t believe that it will work? 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Author's Bio: 30 Tips to Improve Your Memory. Method of loci. The Method of Loci (plural of Latin locus for place or location), also called the memory palace , is a mnemonic device introduced in ancient Roman and Greek rhetorical treatises (in the anonymous Rhetorica ad Herennium , Cicero 's De Oratore , and Quintilian 's Institutio oratoria ).

The items to be remembered in this mnemonic system are mentally associated with specific physical locations. [ 1 ] It relies on memorized spatial relationships to establish, order and recollect memorial content. The term is most often found in specialised works on psychology , neurobiology and memory , though it was used in the same general way at least as early as the first half of the nineteenth century in works on rhetoric , logic and philosophy . [ 2 ] Description [ edit ] O'Keefe and Nadel refer to 'the method of loci', an imaginal technique known to the ancient Greeks and Romans and described by Yates (1966) in her book The Art of Memory as well as by Luria (1969). Contemporary usage [ edit ]