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The_spacing_effect.pdf (application/pdf Object) Zapping the Brain Improves Math Skills. - A mild electrical current improves a person's ability to learn math skills. - The effect lasts up to six months. - The technique could help students learn other skills besides math as well.

Zapping the Brain Improves Math Skills

It's barely enough to light a light bulb, but passing a very mild current of electricity through the brain can turn on a metaphorical light bulb in a person's brain. Scientists from the University of Oxford have shown that they can improve a person's math abilities for up to six months. The research could help treat the nearly 20 percent of the population with moderate to severe dyscalculia (math disability), and could probably aid students in other subjects as well. Daniel Kahneman: The riddle of experience vs. memory. The Invisible Gorilla: And Other Ways Our Intuitions Deceive Us. A brain training exercise that really does work. (Medical Xpress) -- Forget about working crossword puzzles and listening to Mozart.

A brain training exercise that really does work

If you want to improve your ability to reason and solve new problems, just take a few minutes every day to do a maddening little exercise called n-back training. In an award address on May 28 at the annual meeting of the Association for Psychological Science in Washington, D.C., University of Michigan psychologist John Jonides presented new findings showing that practicing this kind of task for about 20 minutes each day for 20 days significantly improves performance on a standard test of fluid intelligence—the ability to reason and solve new problems, which is a crucial element of general intelligence.

And this improvement lasted for up to three months. Jonides, who is the Daniel J. The n-back task involves presenting a series of visual and/or auditory cues to a subject and asking the subject to respond if that cue has occurred, to start with, one time back. Brain Workshop - a Dual N-Back game. Mechanism of long-term memory identified. Natural growth factor enhances memory, prevents forgetting in rats. A naturally occurring growth factor significantly boosted retention and prevented forgetting of a fear memory when injected into rats' memory circuitry during time-limited windows when memories become fragile and changeable.

Natural growth factor enhances memory, prevents forgetting in rats

In the study funded by the National Institutes of Health, animals treated with insulin-like growth factor (IGF-II) excelled at remembering to avoid a location where they had previously experienced a mild shock. "To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of potent memory enhancement via a naturally occurring factor that readily passes through the blood-brain barrier -- and thus may hold promise for treatment development," explained Cristina Alberini, Ph.D., of Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, a grantee of the NIH's National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). Alberini and colleagues say IGF-II could become a potential drug target for boosting memory. They report on their discovery in the Jan. 27, 2011 issue of Nature. How to Build a Memory Palace. Edit Article.

How to Build a Memory Palace

Develop Perfect Memory With the Memory Palace Technique. The Memory Palace is one of the most powerful memory techniques I know.

Develop Perfect Memory With the Memory Palace Technique

It’s not only effective, but also fun to use — and not hard to learn at all. The Memory Palace has been used since ancient Rome, and is responsible for some quite incredible memory feats. Eight-time world memory champion Dominic O’Brien, for instance, was able to memorize 54 decks of cards in sequence (that’s 2808 cards), viewing each card only once. And there are countless other similar achievements attributed to people using the Memory Palace technique or variations of it. Even in fiction, there are several references to the technique. An Active, Purposeful Machine That Comes Out at Night to Play. Super Memory. A better way to remember. Scientists and educators alike have long known that cramming is not an effective way to remember things.

A better way to remember

With their latest findings, researchers at the RIKEN Brain Science Institute in Japan, studying eye movement response in trained mice, have elucidated the neurological mechanism explaining why this is so. Published in the Journal of Neuroscience, their results suggest that protein synthesis in the cerebellum plays a key role in memory consolidation, shedding light on the fundamental neurological processes governing how we remember. The "spacing effect," first discovered over a century ago, describes the observation that humans and animals are able to remember things more effectively if learning is distributed over a long period of time rather than performed all at once. Explaining this observation, the researchers found that the spacing effect was impaired when mice were infused with anisomycin and actinomycin D, antibiotics which inhibit protein synthesis.

A better way to remember. Scientists and educators alike have long known that cramming is not an effective way to remember things.

A better way to remember

With their latest findings, researchers at the RIKEN Brain Science Institute in Japan, studying eye movement response in trained mice, have elucidated the neurological mechanism explaining why this is so. Published in the Journal of Neuroscience, their results suggest that protein synthesis in the cerebellum plays a key role in memory consolidation, shedding light on the fundamental neurological processes governing how we remember.

The "spacing effect", first discovered over a century ago, describes the observation that humans and animals are able to remember things more effectively if learning is distributed over a long period of time rather than performed all at once. Explaining this observation, the researchers found that the spacing effect was impaired when mice were infused with anisomycin and actinomycin D, antibiotics which inhibit protein synthesis.