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Activate Games for Learning American English: Board Games. English Grammar Tenses: Stories, Exercises and Answers. Welcome to the English Grammar Tenses – The Ultimate Resource!

English Grammar Tenses: Stories, Exercises and Answers

One of the easiest ways to teach and learn grammar is through stories. Click Here for Step-by-Step Rules, Stories and Exercises to Practice All English Tenses So we at Really Learn English made this huge collection of stories and exercises available for you, completely free of charge. You can read the stories online, download the story PDF files, print and use them by yourself or with your students, and check the answers using the answer key. All we ask in return, is that if you find this resource useful, please link to it and share it with your students, colleagues, and anyone else who may benefit from it.

Virtuális vártúrák. ESL Song Lessons - tefltunes.com - Songs For Teaching Grammar. ESL and EFL teachers looking for inspiration for lesson planning will find this list of songs to teach English grammar we’ve compiled a useful resource.

ESL Song Lessons - tefltunes.com - Songs For Teaching Grammar

Highlighted are songs available as complete ESL song lesson plans here on tefltunes.com. Songs for teaching present simple Eric Clapton / Wonderful Tonight (lyrics) The Beatles / She Loves You (lyrics) Bette Middler / From A Distance (lyrics) Songs for teaching present continuous. Making quizzes and worksheets. Expand your vocabulary - Knoword. Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day… BusyTeacher: Free Printable Worksheets For Busy Teachers Like YOU! Our Food Our World. BBC Bitesize - Home. ESL discussion material based on TED talks. Earth - Your life on earth. Explore BBC Earth's unique interactive, personalised just to you. Find out how, since the date of your birth, your life has progressed; including how many times your heart has beaten, and how far you have travelled through space.

Investigate how the world around you has changed since you've been alive; from the amount the sea has risen, and the tectonic plates have moved, to the number of earthquakes and volcanoes that have erupted. Grasp the impact we've had on the planet in your lifetime; from how much fuel and food we've used to the species we've discovered and endangered. And see how the BBC was there with you, capturing some of the most amazing wonders of the natural world. Explore, enjoy, and share with your friends either the whole page, or your favourite insights. This is your story, the story of your life on earth.

BBC Earth's Your life on earth is based on the following sources. Ask for Evidence. 2015 Photo Contest. Magyar-angol szótár. Debatabase: a world of great debates. Articles for kids, middle school, teens from Smithsonian. WriteWell. The World If: A compilation of scenarios. CNN Student News. Drowning for Freedom: Libya’s Migrant Jails (Part 1) As Libya descends further into civil war and lawlessness, migrants from Africa and the Middle East continue to journey to the country's coast in search of smugglers to take them across the Mediterranean Sea and into Europe.

Drowning for Freedom: Libya’s Migrant Jails (Part 1)

Search and rescue operations by Libya's coast guard are restricted due to diminishing resources, and have to contend with dangerous gangs of armed traffickers. Those rescued at sea by the coast guard are brought to detention centers, where they face deplorable conditions and are forced to remain for long periods of time. In some instances, migrants are detained by militias in unofficial prisons outside of government control. In part one of a three part series, VICE News is given access to chilling footage filmed by the Libyan coast guard, who have witnessed an influx of migrants trying to cross the Mediterranean Sea, recovering hundreds of bodies of those who've drowned on their journey to Europe.

Day 9 of my Grammarly Christmas: fun and motivating grammar activities for beginner classes. Welcome back to my ‘12 Grammarly Days of Christmas.’

Day 9 of my Grammarly Christmas: fun and motivating grammar activities for beginner classes

For twelve days in the month of December I’m posting either an infographic highlighting the rules that govern the ways we use a certain grammatical point, ideas to help those of us who get confused by said grammar point, and sometimes maybe even a few activities thrown in for good measure. Today is now the ninth day of my Christmas marathon which means I’m moving slowly but surely towards the end of my blogging marathon!

Grammar exercises are a fundamental ingredient of many language lessons, but can become a bit of a drag for both us and our learners if we’re not careful. However, grammar need not necessarily become a dry and tedious affair. If we can make grammar exercises as learner-focused and interactive as possible, we can keep them interesting, enjoyable and, most importantly, effective. 1. The format is simple and therefore easily recognizable to every learner… a surefire winner! Day 8 of my Grammarly Christmas: demonstrative adjectives and pronouns. A very warm welcome back to my ‘12 Grammarly Days of Christmas.’

Day 8 of my Grammarly Christmas: demonstrative adjectives and pronouns

To bring you up to speed if you haven’t been frequenting the blog recently, every day for twelve days I’m posting an infographic highlighting the rules that govern the ways we use a certain grammatical point, along with ideas to help those of us who get confused by said grammar point, and maybe even a few activities thrown in for good measure. Today is now the eighth day of my Christmas marathon which means I’m well and truly on the downward slope and can see light at the end of the tunnel!

Let’s continue with another old classic, demonstratives… This, That, These, Those are called demonstratives and they are used to show the relative distance between the speaker and the noun. It seems simple, but these words can cause a lot of bother to language learners. Now we get to the point where you skip ahead if you’re familiar with the form, this next part is for native speakers who don’t know English grammar! Day 7 of my Grammarly Christmas: adverbs of frequency. A warm welcome back to my ‘12 Grammarly Days of Christmas’… Confused?

Day 7 of my Grammarly Christmas: adverbs of frequency

Basically, every day for twelve days, I’ll be posting an infographic highlighting the rules that govern the ways we use a certain grammatical point, along with ideas to help those of us who get confused by said grammar point, and maybe even a few activities thrown in for good measure. Today is now the seventh day (here’s what you missed yesterday) of my Christmas posting extravaganza meaning I’m on the downward slope and can see light at the end of the tunnel! Let’s continue with another old classic, adverbs of frequency… An adverb of frequency is exactly what it sounds like… an adverb of time.

In other words, adverbs of frequency always describe how often something occurs, either in definite or indefinite terms. Now we get to the point where you skip ahead if you’re familiar with the form, this next part is for native speakers who don’t know English grammar! Day 6 of my Grammarly Christmas: prepositions of place. Those of you who’ve dropped by recently will know that I’m embarking on ‘The 12 Grammarly Days of Christmas’.

Day 6 of my Grammarly Christmas: prepositions of place

Every day for twelve days, I’ll be posting on a well-known and well-loved grammar theme. Today is now the sixth day of my Christmas posting extravaganza; I’m officially half way there and I’m feeling steadily more confident I can do it! Let’s continue what I started on day five, with an old classic: prepositions of place… The prepositions at, in and on are often used in English to talk about places (physical positions) and times. These prepositions can be incredibly tricky for learners, because sometimes the choice of one over another in a particular phrase or sentence seems arbitrary.

Day 5 of my Grammarly Christmas: prepositions of time. Day 4 of my Grammarly Christmas: using video clips to teach grammar. If you’ve been reading the blog recently, you’ll know that I’m embarking on ‘The 12 Grammarly Days of Christmas’.

Day 4 of my Grammarly Christmas: using video clips to teach grammar

Every day for twelve days, I’ll be writing a post highlighting the rules that govern the ways we use a certain grammatical point, along with ideas to help those of us who get confused by said grammar point, and maybe even a few activities thrown in for good measure. Today is now the fourth day in my Christmas posting extravaganza and with each passing day I’m feeling steadily more confident I can do it! In the first three of my posts, I offered grammar advice on a particular verb tense. Day 3 of my Grammarly Christmas: past perfect and past perfect continuous.

Day 2 of my Grammarly Christmas: for and since with present perfect. Those of you who dropped by yesterday will already know that I’m in a sharing mood because it’s Christmas!

Day 2 of my Grammarly Christmas: for and since with present perfect

As crazy as I might be for trying it, I’m embarking on ‘The 12 Grammarly Days of Christmas’. Every day for the next twelve days, I’ll be posting an infographic highlighting the rules that govern the ways we use a certain grammatical point, along with ideas to help those of us who get confused by said grammar point, and maybe even a few activities thrown in for good measure. Today is only the second day of my Christmas posting extravaganza, but I’m already feeling confident I can do it! Let’s continue in classic style, by looking at the differences between the uses of for and since with the present perfect simple tense… On the face of it, the way we use ‘for’ and ‘since’ with the present perfect is really straightforward.

Day 1 of my Grammarly Christmas: present perfect continuous. Well, everyone… it’s Christmas and I’m in a sharing mood!

Day 1 of my Grammarly Christmas: present perfect continuous

As crazy as I might be for trying it, I’m embarking on ‘The 12 Grammarly Days of Christmas’. Every day for the next twelve days, I’ll post an infographic highlighting the rules that govern the ways we use a certain grammatical point, along with ideas to help those of us who get confused by said grammar point, and maybe even a few activities thrown in for good measure. Sounds a little bit crazy already, doesn’t it? Well, maybe it is, but I’m in a festive mood, so I’ll give it a go! Let’s start in classic style, by looking at the differences between the present perfect simple tense and the present perfect continuous tense… Although the differences between the present perfect simple tense and the present perfect continuous tense are subtle, understanding them can be important for correctly conveying our thoughts.

Day 10 of my Grammarly Christmas: an activity for teaching there is/are. Welcome once again to my ‘12 Grammarly Days of Christmas.’ Cool web tools 4 school. Education Resources. Teacher's Resources. Dikter. About. Storyboard That: The World's Best FREE Online Storyboard Creator. Top 10 tanári alkalmazás. TeachMeet. Online dictionaries by bab.la - loving languages. Brainstorm and mind map online. Lino - Sticky and Photo Sharing for you. Animoto - Make & Share Beautiful Videos Online.

Poetry Archive. Simple free learning tools for students and teachers. Prezi - Ideas matter. 47+ Alternatives to Using YouTube in the Classroom. . However, many teachers cannot access YouTube in their classrooms. That is why I originally wrote what became one of the most popular posts to ever appear on . That post is now fourteen months old and I've come across more alternatives in that time. Also in that time span some of the resources on the list have shut down. So it's time to update the list. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. iCue, presented by NBC News, features videos about history and current events. 22. 23. 24 & 25. 26. 27. 28.

Sentence Fluency. Graphic Organizers. Vocabulary, Vocabulary Games - www.myvocabulary.com. Story Starters. Creative writing prompts . com ideas for writers. Awesome Teacher Leaders. These educators are guiding development of our next-generation website scheduled to launch in August—complete with classroom management tools, more stories, more images, summaries of stories, and more! Awesome Teacher Leaders will provide online webinars to demonstrate use of story, primary sources, and media to support the common core, support schools implementing Awesome Stories with onsite training, and spread the word with their schools and districts.