Carbon Sequestration (Storing It)

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Panicum virgatum. Panicum virgatum, commonly known as switchgrass, is a perennial warm season bunchgrass native to North America, where it occurs naturally from 55°N latitude in Canada southwards into the United States and Mexico.

Panicum virgatum

Switchgrass is one of the dominant species of the central North American tallgrass prairie and can be found in remnant prairies, in native grass pastures, and naturalized along roadsides. It is used primarily for soil conservation, forage production, game cover, as an ornamental grass, and more recently as a biomass crop for ethanol and butanol, in phytoremediation projects, fiber, electricity, and heat production and for biosequestration of atmospheric carbon dioxide.

Other common names for switchgrass include tall panic grass, Wobsqua grass, blackbent, tall prairiegrass, wild redtop, thatchgrass, and Virginia switchgrass. Description[edit] Habitat[edit] The Element Carbon. The element Carbon is one of the most important for life.

The Element Carbon

This is because of the way it can bond to other elements to form an infinite variety of molecules, as explained below. Isotopes of Carbon All carbon atoms contain 6 protons in their nuclei and therefore attract six electrons in their neutral unbound state. Carbon sequestration. Carbon sequestration is the process of capture and long-term storage of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO 2)[1] and may refer specifically to: "The process of removing carbon from the atmosphere and depositing it in a reservoir.

Carbon sequestration

New Power Plant Aims to Help Coal Clean Up. Burning coal provides half the electricity in the U.S. and one third of greenhouse gas emissions worldwide.

New Power Plant Aims to Help Coal Clean Up

Capturing that carbon dioxide and storing it will be essential if climate change induced by such pollution is to be averted, according to reports from the U.N. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dubbed carbon capture and storage (or carbon sequestration), such technology will be fully demonstrated for the first time near Mattoon in southeastern Illinois, the FutureGen Alliance (a public–private partnership to build a prototype clean-coal plant) announced. DOE - Fossil Energy: Carbon Capture and Separation. Key Programs and Initiatives Regional Carbon Sequestration PartnershipsDOE has created a nationwide network of federal, state and private sector partnerships to determine the most suitable technologies, regulations, and infrastructure for future carbon capture, storage and sequestration in different areas of the country.

DOE - Fossil Energy: Carbon Capture and Separation

Industrial Carbon Capture & StorageDOE is managing a cost-shared collaboration with industry to demonstrate large-scale industrial carbon capture, and storage technology. Recovery Act ProjectsThe Office of Fossil Energy has received $3.4 billion from the Recovery Act to fund research, development and deployment of technologies to use coal more cleanly and efficiently. Interagency Task Force on Carbon Capture and StorageDOE co-chairs this task force, created by President Obama, to develop a coordinated federal strategy to speed the development and deployment of clean coal technologies.

Carbon Sequestration: Fed pulls plug on FutureGen’s “clean coal” project. Carbon sequestration technology in the United States was dealt a setback at the end of January 2008 when federal energy secretary Samuel Bodman announced that the Department of Energy will radically restructure its FutureGen “clean coal” R&D program. Bodman’s announcement pulled the plug on the Bush administration’s showpiece FutureGen facility in Mattoon, Illinois, operated by the FutureGen Alliance. The Alliance is a nonprofit organization of private investors and utility companies who pledged 25 percent of funding for the project, with the other 75 percent coming from U.S. taxpayers.

Funding for the Mattoon plant had been projected at $1.8 billion, with hopes of recovering about $300 million of that amount by selling electrical power generated by the site. Bodman cited cost overruns and the need to secure more funding from private sources and less from taxpayers. Reduce carbon footprint with carbon offsets.