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Biochar

Biochar
Biochar created through the pyrolysis process. History[edit] Left - a nutrient-poor oxisol; right - an oxisol transformed into fertile terra preta using biochar Pre-Columbian Amazonians are believed to have used biochar to enhance soil productivity. They produced it by smoldering agricultural waste (i.e., covering burning biomass with soil)[5] in pits or trenches.[6] European settlers called it terra preta de Indio.[7] Following observations and experiments, a research team working in French Guiana hypothesized that the Amazonian earthworm Pontoscolex corethrurus was the main agent of fine powdering and incorporation of charcoal debris to the mineral soil.[8] The term “biochar” was coined by Peter Read to describe charcoal used as a soil improvement.[9] Production[edit] Pyrolysis produces biochar, liquids, and gases from biomass by heating the biomass in a low/no oxygen environment. Centralized, decentralized, and mobile systems[edit] Thermo-catalytic depolymerization[edit] Uses[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biochar

Related:  Soils, Compost, Terra Preta and BiocharPermaculture

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How to Make Rooting Hormone with Willow - Attainable Sustainable By Chris Dalziel, contributing writer You probably know that willow bark was the basis for the common over-the-counter drug, Aspirin™ or acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). Young willow twigs contain both salicylic acid, which serves as an antifungal, and indolebutyric acid, a hormone which encourages rooting. Identifying Plant Nutrient Deficiencies - Permablitz Melbourne Not all plant problems are caused by insects or diseases. Sometimes an unhealthy plant is suffering from a nutrient deficiency or even too much of any one nutrient. Plant nutrient deficiencies often manifest as foliage discoloration or distortion. The following chart outlines some possible problems.

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