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The Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for Media Literacy Education. Coordinated by: The Media Education Lab, Temple University The Program on Information Justice and Intellectual Property, American University Washington College of Law The Center for Media & Social Impact, American University With funding from: The John D. and Catherine T.

The Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for Media Literacy Education

Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for Online Video - Center for Media and Social Impact. Introduction What This Is This document is a code of best practices that helps creators, online providers, copyright holders, and others interested in the making of online video interpret the copyright doctrine of fair use.

Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for Online Video - Center for Media and Social Impact

Fair use is the right to use copyrighted material without permission or payment under some circumstances. This is a guide to current acceptable practices, drawing on the actual activities of creators, as discussed among other places in the study Recut, Reframe, Recycle: Quoting Copyrighted Material in User-Generated Video and backed by the judgment of a national panel of experts. Newswise. Newswise — A national magazine tells a professor she needs hundreds of permissions to use its cover photos in her class, when in fact, she could claim fair use, which does not require payment or permission.

newswise

Many teachers want to use YouTube as a teaching tool but aren't sure if it's legal, while others warn their students not to post their video assignments to YouTube. Under fair use, both actions are legal. All manner of content and media is now available online, but fear and misinformation have kept teachers and students from using this valuable material, including portions of films, TV coverage, photos, songs, articles, and audio, in the classroom. Things That Can Happen When You Get Caught Breaking Copyright Laws. Copyright laws exist to protect individuals' and organizations' proprietary creations, granting creators of proprietary property the sole right to produce, distribute and profit from their own creation for a set number of years.

Things That Can Happen When You Get Caught Breaking Copyright Laws

In order to maintain these protections, copyright laws are paired with criminal and civil penalties for those caught reproducing or stealing copyrighted goods. The consequences of breaking copyright laws extend beyond the courtroom, as well, as publicized copyright-infringement cases can damage a company's reputation for years. Civil Lawsuits The first line of defense for copyright holders is civil litigation, in which the owner of a copyright sues a transgressor in civil court.

According to the U.S. Criminal Charges In addition to making financial restitution to copyright holders, those caught breaking copyright law can face serious criminal penalties. Damaged Reputation End Result About the Author Photo Credits Brand X Pictures/Brand X Pictures/Getty Images. MIT Libraries launches online Fair Use Quiz for students. Untitled. Copyright 101: A Simple Lesson in Licenses.

Center for Media & Social Impact. Dramatic Chipmunk Tackles Fair Use Rights. The Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for Media Literacy Education. Copyright Clearance Center. Copyright Basics.

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Citing-images-onblog-tolisano.png (PNG Image, 1588 × 2247 pixels) - Scaled (44%) Free photos. Citing Images overview. How Not to Steal People's Content on the Web. The best content marketers aren't afraid to share.

How Not to Steal People's Content on the Web

Share content. Share links. Share ideas. Share data. Free Pictures of Everything on Earth. eSchool News Finding copyright-friendly photos for the Google Images generation. Searching and citing usable images is easy once students learn the basics Teaching students to respect the intellectual property of others is important in this digital “cut and paste” world we live in.

eSchool News Finding copyright-friendly photos for the Google Images generation

One great project to share with students that can better help them understand how and when they may use images created by others is the Creative Commons project. Creative Commons is designed to span the gap between full copyright and the public domain. The Creative Commons project provides content creators the opportunity to state ahead of time how their images may (or may not) be used. When an image creator posts an image online and applies a Creative Commons license to it, there are four conditions/restrictions they can apply to the image: 1. Here is a sample of what a Creative Commons license may look like. The Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for Media Literacy Education.

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The Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for Media Literacy Education

Coordinated by: The Media Education Lab,Temple UniversityThe Program on Information Justice and Intellectual Property,American University Washington College of LawThe Center for Media & Social Impact,American University With funding from: The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. If not for Congress, Superman, Lassie and Scrabble would be free for anyone to reproduce tomorrow. On Jan. 1, a whole raft of artistic and intellectual works will be making their way into the public domain — or they would be if Congress hadn't extended copyright terms for the umpteenth time in 1998.

If not for Congress, Superman, Lassie and Scrabble would be free for anyone to reproduce tomorrow

At its core, copyright is meant to protect authors and creators. But as we've seen recently with a battle over Sherlock Holmes, copyrights can sometimes prevent well-meaning fans from showing the depth of their appreciation for a work by becoming creators themselves. These days things that were published before 1978 enjoy copyright protections of up to 95 years, but that wasn't always the case. Under the rules Congress made before the most recent term extension, rights-holders of older works were protected for just 75 years — at which point the work would enter the public domain and be free for anyone to use or riff upon.

By that older baseline, the public starting tomorrow would have a huge amount of new and culturally relevant material to work with. Superman "A Christmas Carol" M.C. Welcome To The FACE Kids Site. U.S. Copyright Office. Study: Piracy actually helps small films make money. "Harry Potter" and other big-budget blockbusters benefited from the shutdown of Megaupload more than small- and medium-size films.

Study: Piracy actually helps small films make money

(AP Photo/Warner Bros. Pictures) Stopping Internet piracy may benefit filmmakers -- but only some filmmakers, and only some of the time. That’s one of the implications, at least, of a newly updated study by economists at the Munich School of Management and Copenhagen Business School. Drawing from nearly five years' worth of data, the economists compared box office revenues before and after the shutdown of Megaupload.com, the infamous file-hosting site that, by its own numbers, once accounted for 4 percent of daily Internet traffic. That did happen for some films, like “Harry Potter” and “Ice Age” -- a finding some economists have reached before.

How is that possible? For “Harry Potter,” that’s no big deal -- everyone knows about “Harry Potter,” courtesy of Warner Brothers’ massive advertising budget.