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Jason Silva on Instagram: “Perspective” Upworthy Video - For many people, the eyewear they need is... Five better indicators than GDP. The world's most toxic town: the terrible legacy of Zambia's lead mines. “I’d like to be a doctor,” says seven-year-old Martin, sitting quietly in his modest home in Kabwe, Zambia.

The world's most toxic town: the terrible legacy of Zambia's lead mines

But the truth is that Martin struggles with his schoolwork, and his dream seems unlikely to become a reality. Kabwe is the world’s most toxic town, according to pollution experts, where mass lead poisoning has almost certainly damaged the brains and other organs of generations of children – and where children continue to be poisoned every day. Almost a century of lead mining and smelting has left a truly toxic legacy in the once-thriving town of 220,000 people in central Africa’s Copperbelt, 100km north of the capital Lusaka. This one map explains the entire worldwide economy. A map by HowMuch.net provides a fascinating perspective on the worldwide economy.

This one map explains the entire worldwide economy

The map represents each country relative to the size of its nominal gross domestic product, the type of GDP that is not adjusted for inflation. The larger the area, the larger the size of the economy. Each area is divided into three sectors -- services, industrial, and agricultural -- to visualize which industries contribute most to the country's GDP. Economist. CHILDBIRTH was once a reliably dangerous experience.

economist

As late as the 1930s, one out of every 100 live births in the United States cost a woman her life; similar rates were seen around the world. But the 20th century brought tremendous advances in obstetric medicine and widened access to decent care. The maternal-mortality rate plummeted in rich countries by as much as 99%, and now poor countries are starting to catch up. What Ecuador can teach us about poverty relief. Is eradicating poverty, a goal the United Nations’ hopes to achieve by 2030, actually feasible?

What Ecuador can teach us about poverty relief

New research out of Ecuador says yes – if governments are willing to pay for it. According to a United Nations University (UNU) - Merit study of Ecuador’s Human Development Bonus (Bono de Desarrollo Humano, or BDH), direct cash transfers have definitively improved social mobility, or the ability of individuals or households to move between social strata. And it has helped poor families climb out of poverty, especially when complemented by other economic-inclusion programs. Cash on hand. Turning goats into water: A solution for the desert. Giving money to the poor does work. Just look at Ecuador. Is eradicating poverty, a goal the United Nations’ hopes to achieve by 2030, actually feasible?

Giving money to the poor does work. Just look at Ecuador

New research out of Ecuador says yes – if governments are willing to pay for it. According to a United Nations University (UNU) - Merit study of Ecuador’s Human Development Bonus (Bono de Desarrollo Humano, or BDH), direct cash transfers have definitively improved social mobility, or the ability of individuals or households to move between social strata. And it has helped poor families climb out of poverty, especially when complemented by other economic-inclusion programs. Cash on hand. Strong Coffee, Stronger Women. INTERNATIONAL NETS CHAMPIONSHIP – Schedule.

Malaria: Kenya, Ghana and Malawi get first vaccine. Image copyright D Poland/PATH The world's first vaccine against malaria will be introduced in three countries - Ghana, Kenya and Malawi - starting in 2018.

Malaria: Kenya, Ghana and Malawi get first vaccine

The RTS,S vaccine trains the immune system to attack the malaria parasite, which is spread by mosquito bites. The World Health Organization (WHO) said the jab had the potential to save tens of thousands of lives. World Water Day 2017: 60 powerful photos to make you think twice about leaving the tap running. More than 650 million people, or 10% of the world's population, do not have access to safe water, putting them at risk of infectious diseases and premature death.

World Water Day 2017: 60 powerful photos to make you think twice about leaving the tap running

World Water Day is marked on 22 March every year to raise awareness of the water crisis facing much of the world's population. The UN estimates that more than 663 million people do not have a safe water supply close to home. Instead of turning on a tap, they must spend countless hours queueing or trekking to sources of water. This water is often contaminated, putting people at risk of infectious diseases and premature death. Dirty water and poor sanitation can cause severe diseases in children, killing 900 under-fives every day across the world, according to United Nations estimates – or one child every two minutes.

The Risky Lives of Women Sent Into Exile—For Menstruating. Photographer Poulomi Basu’s mother, a widow, does not wear the color red.

The Risky Lives of Women Sent Into Exile—For Menstruating

In India, the country of Basu’s birth, red symbolizes both purity and sin and is also used to mark auspicious occasions. Traditional Hindu culture dictates widows dress only in saris made of white—the hue of mourning and death—for the rest of their lives. Dollar Street. Dozens of countries poised to drive out malaria by 2020. Hopes of eliminating malaria from more than 30 countries with a total population of 2 billion have risen following the successful removal of the disease from Sri Lanka.

Dozens of countries poised to drive out malaria by 2020

Public health officials said 13 countries, including Argentina and Turkey, had reported no cases for at least a year and may well follow the success of Sri Lanka, which this week declared itself malaria-free after meeting the criterion of going three years without an infection. By the end of the decade, another 21 countries, including China, Malaysia and Iran, could be free of the disease, which kills 400,000 people, mostly babies and pregnant women, every year.

Public health officials believe that in years to come the elimination from Sri Lanka, highly symbolic because the island came within a hair’s breadth of defeating malaria more than 50 years ago, may be regarded as the beginning of the end for the disease. “The country took ownership of the problem themselves,” Dr Pedro Alonso said. The Economist - Journal. But Really ... How Are The Olympics Still Even Happening? Sahar Speaks — shougofaAlikozay. WORLD HEALTH RANKINGS. Access more than 36,000 Country Health correlations with this powerful comparison tool that let's you create side by side comparisons between any two countries in the world.

WORLD HEALTH RANKINGS

Simply select a country from the list below to visit that country's page, we have selected a default comparison for you. Use the scrolling lists menu to select which country you want to compare it to or choose a new country. Google. Google. Home - Asha India. Google. Google. Google. Google. Dry pit latrine. The invention that stops girls missing school every month.

Google. Google. Ultrasound machines are expensive, so these 2 college kids came up with a better plan. 3 ways humans create poverty - /The Rules. This article originally appeared on Fast Company on 12th March 2015 Poverty isn’t just a fact of nature. We made it happen, and we can fix it. Written By. 3 ways humans create poverty - /The Rules. Drowning in liquid filth – in 21st century India. Saudi activists – who are they and what do they want? The Surprising Reason Some Teens Don’t Know Enough About Sex Ed. When you don’t have access to high-quality sex education, learning about sexual health becomes like a game of whispers: facts get distorted, passing misconceptions from person to person. Low levels of literacy and poor education skills just compound the problem. Comments. The girl who said 'no' to marriage. Ashes to ashes: How our relationship with smoking has changed in a decade. Argentine and Brazilian doctors suspect mosquito insecticide as cause of microcephaly.

Malformations detected in thousands of children from pregnant women living in areas where the Brazilian state added Pyriproxyfen to drinking water are not a coincidence, even though the Ministry of Health places direct blame on the Zika virus. How to eradicate a disease. Make Poverty History - Videos. Huffingtonpost. Life expectancy three years longer for children born into smaller families. Children born into smaller families in the world's poorest nations will live an expected three years longer than those born into larger families, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests. The findings, being presented at the International Conference on Family Planning in Nusa Dua, Indonesia, show that while family planning programs have sometimes been pitched as ways to moderate population growth and minimize pressure on resource-strapped nations, they have real health impacts on individuals.

"For 40 years, the slogan 'a small family is a happy family' has been used to promote contraceptive use in developing countries," says study leader Saifuddin Ahmed, MBBS, PhD, an associate professor with the Bloomberg School's Department of Population, Family and Reproductive Health and Bill & Melinda Gates Institute for Family and Reproductive Health. Make Poverty History - Take Action. Family planning is 'critical link' in eradicating poverty.

Giving people access to family planning is crucial to achieving the sustainable development goals (SDGs) by 2030, reproductive health experts said this week. Speaking at an international family planning conference in Bali, Ellen Starbird, director of population and reproductive health at USAid, said family planning was the “critical link” to meet each of the 17 goals that were adopted by UN member states in September.

Targets in two of the SDGs – goals three and five – call for universal access to sexual and reproductive healthcare and rights. But those campaigning for wider access to family planning and improved reproductive healthcare believe that unless more people are offered modern contraception, other interventions to reduce poverty and inequality may be far less effective. Starbird pointed to the energy crisis in many poorer countries: despite huge efforts in developing countries to provide electricity, capacity is “eaten up” by growing populations.