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80/20 Collective

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Don't Ask What The Internet Can Do For Art, Ask What Art Can Do For The Internet. Henry David Thoreau. Thoreau's books, articles, essays, journals, and poetry total over 20 volumes.

Henry David Thoreau

Among his lasting contributions are his writings on natural history and philosophy, where he anticipated the methods and findings of ecology and environmental history, two sources of modern-day environmentalism. His literary style interweaves close natural observation, personal experience, pointed rhetoric, symbolic meanings, and historical lore, while displaying a poetic sensibility, philosophical austerity, and "Yankee" love of practical detail.[3] He was also deeply interested in the idea of survival in the face of hostile elements, historical change, and natural decay; at the same time he advocated abandoning waste and illusion in order to discover life's true essential needs.[3] Name pronunciation and physical appearance[edit] In appearance he was homely, with a nose that he called "my most prominent feature.

Jacques Cousteau. Jacques-Yves Cousteau AC (French: [ʒak iv kusto]; commonly known in English as Jacques Cousteau; 11 June 1910 – 25 June 1997)[1] was a French naval officer, explorer, conservationist, filmmaker, innovator, scientist, photographer, author and researcher who studied the sea and all forms of life in water.

Jacques Cousteau

He co-developed the Aqua-Lung, pioneered marine conservation and was a member of the Académie française. Biography "The sea, the great unifier, is man's only hope. Abraham Maslow. Abraham Harold Maslow (/ˈmæzloʊ/[citation needed]; April 1, 1908 – June 8, 1970) was an American psychologist who was best known for creating Maslow's hierarchy of needs, a theory of psychological health predicated on fulfilling innate human needs in priority, culminating in self-actualization.[2] Maslow was a psychology professor at Brandeis University, Brooklyn College, New School for Social Research and Columbia University.

Abraham Maslow

He stressed the importance of focusing on the positive qualities in people, as opposed to treating them as a "bag of symptoms. "[3] A Review of General Psychology survey, published in 2002, ranked Maslow as the tenth most cited psychologist of the 20th century.[4] Carl Sagan. Carl Edward Sagan (/ˈseɪɡən/; November 9, 1934 – December 20, 1996) was an American astronomer, cosmologist, astrophysicist, astrobiologist, author, science popularizer, and science communicator in astronomy and other natural sciences.

Carl Sagan

His contributions were central to the discovery of the high surface temperatures of Venus. However, he is best known for his contributions to the scientific research of extraterrestrial life, including experimental demonstration of the production of amino acids from basic chemicals by radiation. Sagan assembled the first physical messages that were sent into space: the Pioneer plaque and the Voyager Golden Record, universal messages that could potentially be understood by any extraterrestrial intelligence that might find them. Sagan always advocated scientific skeptical inquiry and the scientific method, pioneered exobiology and promoted the Search for Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence (SETI). Antoine de Saint-Exupéry. Prior to the war, Saint-Exupéry had achieved fame in France as an aviator.

Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

His literary works – among them The Little Prince, translated into over 250 languages and dialects – posthumously boosted his stature to national hero status in France.[6][7] He earned further widespread recognition with international translations of his other works. His 1939 philosophical memoir Terre des hommes became the name of a major international humanitarian group, and was also used to create the central theme (Terre des hommes—Man and His World) of the most successful world's fair of the 20th century, Expo 67 in Montreal, Canada.[8] Youth and aviation[edit] Birthplace of Saint-Exupéry in the Presqu'île section of Lyon, on the street now named after him, in blue at lower left. Saint-Exupéry was born in Lyon to an aristocratic family that could trace its lineage back several centuries. Bob Marley. Robert Nesta "Bob" Marley, OM (6 February 1945 – 11 May 1981) was a Jamaican reggae singer, song writer, musician, and guitarist who achieved international fame and acclaim.[1][2] Starting out in 1963 with the group The Wailers, he forged a distinctive songwriting and vocal style that would later resonate with audiences worldwide.

Bob Marley

The Wailers would go on to release some of the earliest reggae records with producer Lee Scratch Perry.[3] After the Wailers disbanded in 1974,[4] Marley pursued a solo career that culminated in the release of the album Exodus in 1977, which established his worldwide reputation and produced his status as one of the world's best-selling artists of all time, with sales of more than 75 million records.[5][6] He was a committed Rastafari who infused his music with a sense of spirituality.[7] Early life and career Marley and Neville Livingston (later known as Bunny Wailer) had been childhood friends in Nine Mile. Bob Marley and the Wailers 1962–1972: Early years Notes. Mahatma Gandhi. Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi (pronounced [ˈmoːɦənd̪aːs ˈkərəmtʃənd̪ ˈɡaːnd̪ʱi] ( ); 2 October 1869 – 30 January 1948) was the preeminent leader of Indian nationalism in British-ruled India.

Mahatma Gandhi

Employing nonviolent civil disobedience, Gandhi led India to independence and inspired movements for civil rights and freedom across the world. The honorific Mahatma (Sanskrit: "high-souled", "venerable"[2])—applied to him first in 1914 in South Africa,[3]—is now used worldwide. He is also called Bapu (Gujarati: endearment for "father",[4] "papa"[4][5]) in India. Gandhi famously led Indians in challenging the British-imposed salt tax with the 400 km (250 mi) Dandi Salt March in 1930, and later in calling for the British to Quit India in 1942.

Gandhi is commonly, though not officially,[10] considered the Father of the Nation[11] in India. Theodore Roosevelt. Theodore Roosevelt (/ˈroʊzəvɛlt/ ROH-zə-velt;[a] October 27, 1858 – January 6, 1919), often referred to as Teddy or TR, was an American statesman, author, explorer, soldier, naturalist, and reformer who served as the 26th President of the United States.

Theodore Roosevelt

A leader of the Republican Party, he was a leading force of the Progressive Era. Born a sickly child with debilitating asthma, Roosevelt embraced a strenuous lifestyle and successfully regained his health. He integrated his exuberant personality, vast range of interests, and world-famous achievements into a "cowboy" persona defined by robust masculinity. Home-schooled, he became a lifelong naturalist before attending Harvard College.

His first of many books, The Naval War of 1812 (1882), established his reputation as both a learned historian and a popular writer. The assassination of President McKinley in September 1901 meant that the forty-two-year-old had become President of the United States, the youngest in history. Edward Abbey. John Muir. In his later life, Muir devoted most of his time to the preservation of the Western forests.

John Muir

He petitioned the U.S. Congress for the National Park bill that was passed in 1890, establishing Yosemite and Sequoia National Parks. The spiritual quality and enthusiasm toward nature expressed in his writings inspired readers, including presidents and congressmen, to take action to help preserve large nature areas.[3] He is today referred to as the "Father of the National Parks"[4] and the National Park Service has produced a short documentary about his life.[5] Alan Watts. Terence McKenna. Buckminster Fuller. Marcel Duchamp. Henri-Robert-Marcel Duchamp (French: [maʁsɛl dyʃɑ̃]; 28 July 1887 – 2 October 1968) was a French, naturalized American painter, sculptor, chess player and writer whose work is associated with Cubism, conceptual art and Dada,[1][2][3] although he was careful about his use of the term Dada[4] and was not directly associated with Dada groups.

Marcel Duchamp

Duchamp is commonly regarded, along with Pablo Picasso and Henri Matisse, as one of the three artists who helped to define the revolutionary developments in the plastic arts in the opening decades of the twentieth century, responsible for significant developments in painting and sculpture.[5][6][7][8] Duchamp has had an immense impact on twentieth-century and twenty first-century art. By World War I, he had rejected the work of many of his fellow artists (like Henri Matisse) as "retinal" art, intended only to please the eye. Instead, Duchamp wanted to put art back in the service of the mind.[9] Early life and education[edit] Early work[edit]

Banksy. Banksy is an England-based graffiti artist, political activist and film director of unverified identity. His satirical street art and subversive epigrams combine dark humour with graffiti executed in a distinctive stenciling technique. His works of political and social commentary have been featured on streets, walls, and bridges of cities throughout the world.[1] Banksy's work grew out of the Bristol underground scene, which involved collaborations between artists and musicians.[2] Observers have noted that his style is similar to Blek le Rat, who began to work with stencils in 1981 in Paris.[3][4] Banksy says that he was inspired by "3D", a graffiti artist who later became a founding member of Massive Attack, an English musical group.[5] Banksy displays his art on publicly visible surfaces such as walls and self-built physical prop pieces.

Career Early career (1990–2001) Jimi Hendrix. James Marshall "Jimi" Hendrix (born Johnny Allen Hendrix; November 27, 1942 – September 18, 1970) was an American guitarist, singer, and songwriter. Although his mainstream career spanned only four years, he is widely regarded as one of the most influential electric guitarists in the history of popular music, and one of the most celebrated musicians of the 20th century. The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame describes him as "arguably the greatest instrumentalist in the history of rock music".[1] Born in Seattle, Washington, Hendrix began playing guitar at the age of 15. In 1961, he enlisted in the US Army; he was granted an honorable discharge the following year. Soon afterward, he moved to Clarksville, Tennessee, and began playing gigs on the chitlin' circuit, earning a place in the Isley Brothers' backing band and later with Little Richard, with whom he continued to work through mid-1965.